News

July 19, 2017

The three Bald Eaglets in A3 are exercising well; wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that eaglet #17-0836 [green bumpers] is the strongest flier out of the three. Each eaglet has been consistently flying about five to six passes; this week, the eaglets will be pushed to five to 10 passes. Once they are consistently flying at 15+ passes during each session, release will be considered. Dr. Ernesto is getting in touch with the state eagle biologist to see if he has extra GPS transmitters for any of the eaglets.  

July 19, 2017

Results from Black Bear #17-1180’s fructosamine test came back on Tuesday afternoon. Dr. Ernesto reports that the bear’s glucose levels are normal, which confirms the more simple in-house lab tests. The bear’s bile acid levels are high, which can be an indication of liver disease. The bear was not fasted prior to this test, which can also affect results. The team will draw more blood samples this week after the bear is fasted and another sample after the bear is fed; these samples should yield additional diagnostic information.

July 18, 2017

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service permits were approved for Bald Eagle #15-0355 and transportation arrangements are underway to drive the eagle to her new home in New York.  A veterinary extern student will drive the bird partway to Pennsylvania on July 24, where she'll meet up with the director of Wild Spirit Education. 

July 18, 2017

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service permits were approved for Bald Eagle #15-0733; this means that the bird is one big step closer to going to his new home! At this point, it's been too hot to fly the eagle commercially to the New Mexico Wildlife Center; it's likely that the Center will need to wait until fall to ship the bird, unless alternative arrangements can be made through a private airplane pilot or a long road trip!

July 17, 2017

On Friday, July 14, the veterinary team decided to perform a physical examination on Black Bear cub #17-1180 [Double Pink Tags]. The rehabilitation staff had noted some intermittent ataxia [incoordination] recently, which is not a new symptom for this cub. Days after admission in May, the bear exhibited the same intermittent unsteadiness before he was moved in with the other bear cubs. The veterinary team never found a cause for the neurologic issues, but it appears as though the symptoms periodically have resurfaced during the past month.

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