Current Patients

Black Bear #14-0126

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: April 16, 2014

With the arrival of the bear cubs of 2014, the Wildlife Center of Virginia staff and officials with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries decided to try to use a female bear yearling as a surrogate “big sister”. This technique was used by the Wildlife Center in 2012 and there have been several other instances at other bear rehabilitation facilities when cubs were fostered onto female yearlings.

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

We caught Black Bear #14-0126 attempting to get comfortable while napping in a tree yesterday ... and we managed to get a video clip of it!

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

On March 21, the Wildlife Center staff caught Black Bears #14-0126 and #14-0142 in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Both bears were given a quick physical examination and were weighed; both proved to be difficult to capture – they wanted nothing to do with people!

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 14, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0126 is moving well and has been very active in her enclosure. She has been observed climbing the trees and has been eating well. On March 12, the yearling was introduced to a new roommate -- Black Bear yearling #14-0142. Both bears appear comfortable with each other as well as their new enclosure. The Center’s staff will continue to monitor the bears’ behaviors and appetites.

 

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 10, 2014

During the weekend, Black Bear #14-0126’s heart rate remained lower than normal, although by March 9, the bear was brighter and more alert. Follow-up blood work indicated that the bear was slightly anemic, but no other abnormalities were noted. The bear is eating a regular bear meal and as of Sunday, had gained two kilograms (4.4 lbs) since admission.

The veterinary team decided to move the bear to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure on March 9. The team will continue to monitor the bear via webcam, and will perform additional blood work on March 17.
 

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 6, 2014

On March 5, Dr. Rich Sim noted that Black Bear #14-0126’s heart rate was low. The bear’s heart rate was measured at 66 beats per minute; a typical heart rate for a bear this age would be about 120-130 beats per minute.

Black Bear #14-0221

Residents in Albemarle County noticed a small Black Bear hanging around the area for a couple of weeks in late March. On April 3, landowners noticed the bear lying in a ditch. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the call and a biologist was able to capture the bear. While landowners reported that the bear looked like it was dragging its hind end, the bear appeared to be able to weakly walk prior to capture.

Latest Update: April 16, 2014

On April 15, Black Bear #14-0221 was darted and anesthetized for her dental procedure. 

Residents in Albemarle County noticed a small Black Bear hanging around the area for a couple of weeks in late March. On April 3, landowners noticed the bear lying in a ditch. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the call and a biologist was able to capture the bear. While landowners reported that the bear looked like it was dragging its hind end, the bear appeared to be able to weakly walk prior to capture.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

During the week of April 7, Black Bear yearling #14-0221 showed signs of improvement and was moved to the Large Mammal isolation enclosure. At times throughout the first week, the staff noted that the bear appeared to be walking slowly and the bear’s hind legs were weak. This was likely due to muscle atrophy from the bear’s emaciation. By April 12, the staff noted that the bear appeared to be stronger.

Residents in Albemarle County noticed a small Black Bear hanging around the area for a couple of weeks in late March. On April 3, landowners noticed the bear lying in a ditch. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the call and a biologist was able to capture the bear. While landowners reported that the bear looked like it was dragging its hind end, the bear appeared to be able to weakly walk prior to capture.

Latest Update: April 7, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0221 is eating well and gaining weight. The emaciated yet increasingly feisty yearling now weighs 13.3 kg. On April 7, blood will be drawn for analysis. If blood work results improve, the yearling will be transitioned to a more solid diet this week.

Wild Turkey #14-0183

On March 27, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusually colored patient – a “smoke phase” Wild Turkey. The female turkey was found in Stanardsville earlier this week, and after the homeowners watched the lethargic bird for several days, they were able to capture her and bring her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 16, 2014

Photos of the Wild Turkey release from Dr. Dave McRuer:

 

 

On March 27, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusually colored patient – a “smoke phase” Wild Turkey. The female turkey was found in Stanardsville earlier this week, and after the homeowners watched the lethargic bird for several days, they were able to capture her and bring her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 15, 2014

Following admission of patient #14-0183, the veterinary staff monitored the turkey’s appetite, attitude, and ability to walk. The bird remained well-hydrated and was able to move well, despite the old fracture of the toe.

On April 2, the rehabilitation staff moved the turkey to an outdoor enclosure where the staff could further monitor the turkey’s ability to ambulate [walk]. The turkey was moved to a larger flight pen on April 8, giving the staff an opportunity to observe the turkey in a larger space.

Black Bear cubs of 2013

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

On April 3, officials from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries came to the Wildlife Center to assess the behavior of the bears in the Bear Complex. The three DGIF officials [including Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki], Dr. Dave, and Ed Clark approached each set of bear yearlings in the complex to see if the bears showed any interest in humans.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Over the course of last week, workers from Kjellstrom & Lee were able to secure the last of the black “anti-climbing” plastic to yard #3, making it ready to house bears. On Monday, March 30, the veterinary team decided to dart two Black Bears in yard #1 of the Black Bear Complex, and move them to yard #3. The team decided that breaking up the group of five bears that seem less wary of humans might help break some bad habits, and might also allow the staff to assess if one or two of the bears were the main “instigators”. The move went well.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

The veterinary team was able to successfully dart and tag four Black Bears in yard #1 today. Five bears were enclosed in transition area #1 for darting; the female bear that was released and returned in January was not successfully darted. All four of the darted bears were males and were able to be identified via microchip: #14-0450, #14-0470, #13-0646, and #13-0663.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

On the first day of spring, the veterinary team met to discuss plans for the Black Bears at the Wildlife Center. With the change in season, it is time to start thinking about next steps!

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: February 19, 2014

During the past few weeks, the staff have noted a variety of behaviors with some of the Black Bear yearlings at the Center. As many Critter Cam viewers can attest, five of the yearlings have remained fairly active in yard #1 of the Black Bear Complex. These five bears are also ones that continue to show the most interest in humans when the rehabilitation staff conduct weekly perimeter checks of the Black Bear Complex. Hazing continues during these periodic checks; the staff want to ensure that these bears do not approach humans after they are released.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 30, 2014

On the evening of January 29, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries and the Wildlife Center of Virginia received word that a bear yearling with ear tags was in a residential area. The homes were not far from the January 24 release site of five bears – and people were feeding and making physical contact with the bear. A biologist and conservation officer, from the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries and local police deputies responded to the scene to dart and capture the bear; they confirmed that this yearling was one of the bears in the January 24 release group.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 28, 2014

Monday’s bear release went well – the biologists report that the release was uneventful, and all of the bears ran off in an excited group – except for one who wanted to stop and sniff everything. The release location is in a great bear habitat, with lots of large den trees and other natural den structures. The remote location is also a place where food is typically abundant in the spring and summer.

The next bear release [of four bears] will be on Thursday, January 30.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 27, 2014

On the morning of January 27, two biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries arrived to pick up four bears for release. Dr. Rich, the Center’s veterinary fellow, quickly darted the three bears in transition area #2 – three female bears. Two of the bears were unable to be identified by microchip (but did include Saturday’s escapee bear); the other female was #13-0889.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 25, 2014

On January 25, one of the Black Bears in transition #1 tested the double-door system of the Black Bear Complex – she managed to escape out of the transition area, into the wide corridor which is surrounded by the perimeter fence. The bear was noticed in the outer corridor from the Critter Cam in the Center’s lobby. A quick head count confirmed that a bear was missing from transition area #1.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 24, 2014

On January 24, the first of several Black Bear releases began. Five bears in transition area #2 were successfully darted and anesthetized by Wildlife Center staff and DGIF biologists. Circular ear tags were placed in both ears of each bear, and the bears were scanned for microchips. Bears #13-0425, #13-1266, #13-1044, #13-0469, and an un-scannable female were loaded into a large bear trap. The veterinary team provided the bears with a reversal medication before the doors were locked and the trap was loaded onto the DGIF truck.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 23, 2014

This afternoon, the Wildlife Center team managed to shift five bears from Black Bear Complex yard #2 into the adjoining transition area, and six bears from yard #1 into the adjoining transition area. One of the biologists scheduled to come tomorrow may reschedule for next week. The other DGIF biologist will be arriving at the Center just after 9:00 a.m., and has a large trap – he may take five or more bears, depending on size. Stay tuned for updates on Friday, January 24, as to which bears have been released!

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 23, 2014

Ear tags for the 17 Black Bears arrived at the Wildlife Center today. With those in hand, the releases will begin on Friday, January 24.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 17, 2014

The 17 Black Bears have been doing well during the first week of living in the new Black Bear Complex. Dr. Dave McRuer and DGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki have been formulating a release plan for the bears. Because several small groups of bears will be released by several different biologists, there is a lot of coordination involved.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 10, 2014

Views from the Critter Cam on the morning of January 10 revealed at least nine bear cubs in trees in the new Black Bear Complex. The cubs appear to be settling in and enjoying their new space in the large bear yards.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 9, 2014

On the morning of January 9, the Wildlife Center team began the second day of moving bears to the new Black Bear Complex.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 8, 2014

The Wildlife Center veterinary team successfully moved four bear cubs to the new Black Bear Complex today.

When certified wildlife rehabilitators Kelli and Amber arrived at work this morning, they were able to enclose two cubs in the connecting chute in the Large Mammal enclosure. Two other cubs were enclosed in Large Mammal enclosure #1.

At about 10:00 a.m., Drs. Rich and Kristin darted the first two cubs in the connecting chute. Within a half hour, the cubs were successfully anesthetized and pulled out of the large mammal enclosure for weights.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: January 7, 2014

On Monday January 6, the Kjellstrom & Lee work crew put the finishing touches on Bear Complex enclosures #1 and #2. The Wildlife Center team plans on moving bear cubs on January 8.

The process of moving the cubs will take several days. Four cubs will be moved on the first day -- two cubs in each transition area of enclosures 1 and 2.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: December 31, 2013

Construction on the Bear Complex continues during the week of December 30. Dr. Dave has been inspecting the nearly-complete facility daily, and after talking with the Kjellstrom & Lee team, he anticipates that the complex should be bear-ready after a few more days of work, if the weather holds.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: December 11, 2013

Work continues on the Black Bear Complex; the crew estimates that work should be complete sometime during the week of December 16 [barring any additional weather delays].  The staff hopes to move a first group of four bears as soon as the complex is complete.  

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: December 2, 2013

The 17 Black Bear cubs are growing bigger by the day! All cubs are doing well, including the newest and smallest addition, #13-2606.

Recently, News Leader photographer Mike Tripp spent a day at the Wildlife Center. Mike spent time with the rehabilitation staff as they cared for a variety of patients, and prepared feature video on “a day with the bears”

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: November 16, 2013

On November 15, Dr. Dave and Kelsey, the Center's rehabilitation intern, moved cub #13-2606 into one side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The other 16 bears were enclosed in the other side, and were able to enter the connecting tunnel between the two pens, so that all bears could get some face-to-face introductions with the newest cub.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: October 14, 2013

The 16 Black Bear cubs residing in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure at the Wildlife Center are all doing well. As many Critter Cam watchers can attest, the cubs have been growing over the past few months, and these days look quite large! The staff are excited to move the cubs into the soon-to-be-completed Black Bear Complex sometime in the next month.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: August 2, 2013

The connecting chute between Large Mammal enclosure #1 and #2 was opened on the afternoon of August 2. The two groups of eight bears very quickly mingled into one giant group of 16 cubs – all is going well!

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: August 1, 2013

The remaining eight cubs in the Center’s Bear Pen were successfully darted and sedated for the big move today. Dr. Rich and Dr. Kristin darted the cubs, one or two at a time, and were able to examine and weigh four of them prior to loading them into crates for the move. The cubs were scanned to detect and read their microchips – the system worked great for the sedated cubs. Four of the cubs weren’t fully asleep, and the staff quickly loaded them directly into a crate for the move.

The identifiable cubs with weights include:

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: July 31, 2013

It’s been nearly a week since eight of the Black Bear cubs were moved into the newly completed Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The staff have made some adjustments to the enclosure – extending the privacy barrier in hopes of reducing the pacing of one bear cub, and eliminating the "anti-climbing" boards. One cub does have some minor paw injuries from too much climbing – the veterinary team is monitoring the cub, but believe that the injury may be self-limiting – if the bear cub’s paws are sore, the cub will stop climbing and its paws will heal.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: July 25, 2013

It's moving day!

After the completion of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure on July 24, eight bear cubs [from Bear Pen 1] were moved today.   The veterinary team started early this morning to gather their supplies for the big bear move. The staff and students split into two teams: the “sedation team” and the “recovery team”.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: July 23, 2013

Work is nearly complete on the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; just a few odds and ends remain to make the pen entirely ready for the bear cubs. The pen has been wired and set-up with cam cable; the team will be working on positioning cameras on Wednesday, July 24.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2013

All 16 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s bear pens. The rehabilitation staff clean the two pens frequently, and are looking forward to moving the cubs into a bigger space! The large mammal isolation enclosure construction is coming along well; the enclosure should be completed within the next two weeks. Once the enclosure is finished, the plan is to move all of the cubs to that new facility – at least for now. All cubs will need to be darted, sedated, and weighed prior to moving.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 19, 2013

Black Bear cub #13-1266 was successfully captured this morning after Dr. Rich, the Center’s veterinary fellow, darted the cub when it was in a tree. A extern student, Emily, was posted as the “cub guard” this morning when the cub was first spotted back in a tree near the Center’s Bear Pen; at about 10:30 a.m. she saw the cub beginning to climb down the tree. Emily radioed to the rest of the staff, and a small number of vet staff members went to investigate. Dr. Rich decided that he had a clear shot of the cub, so he fired a dart.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 19, 2013

Black Bear cub #13-1266, Monday’s escapee, was spotted this morning in a tree right beside the Center’s Bear Pen! It appears as though the cub was able to extract the food out of the live trap last night, but managed to avoid being caught. A student has been stationed at the Bear Pen to watch the cub this morning. The staff will put up a small temporary fence around the cub’s tree today, and will be seeking a larger trap to catch the bear.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 18, 2013

Still no sign of the escapee bear cub as of Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. The staff and students combed the woods today in hopes of spotting the bear, but there are a variety of hiding places in the leafy trees surrounding the Center. The staff set-up a live trap as well as a game-cam; hopefully tomorrow will bring additional cub sightings and updates.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 18, 2013

On Monday, June 17, staff rehabilitators Kelli and Amber entered Bear Pen 2. As they were entering, one of the cubs that was hiding beside the door managed to slip past them and out of the bear pen. The young cub promptly climbed a tree.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 11, 2013

On Saturday, June 8, the rehabilitation staff and students weighed the cubs in Bear Pen 2, and did some “rearranging”.  Black Bear cubs #13-1266 and 1277, the siblings from Tazewell County, were from inside the clinic and introduced to the cubs in Bear Pen 2.  The two largest cubs in Bear Pen 2, #13-0874 and #13-0876, were moved next door to Bear Pen 1.  This means the 16 cubs are split evenly into groups of eight, with the larger cubs in Bear Pen 1.

The latest weights:

Bear Pen 1 additions:
#13-0874: 8.20 kg
#13-0876: 9.33 kg

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 7, 2013

The Bear Pen 2 Black Bear cubs were weighed on Wednesday, June 5.  With the latest weight gains, three more cubs were cut-off from formula feedings; that means only the smallest two cubs in Bear Pen 2 are being fed formula once a day.

The current weights:

#13-0425: 5.60 kg
#13-0646: 5.60 kg
#13-0874: 7.60 kg
#13-0875: 6.30 kg
#13-0876: 8.60 kg
#13-0889: 4.60 kg
#13-0902: 5.90 kg
#13-1044: 4.30 kg

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: June 3, 2013

All 14 Black Bear cubs continue to thrive at the Wildlife Center.  The eight smaller cubs were weighed on Sunday, June 2:

#13-0425: 4.46 kg
#13-0646: 5.10 kg
#13-0874: 7.23 kg
#13-0875: 6.00 kg
#13-0876: 7.50 kg
#13-0889: 3.91 kg
#13-0902: 5.20 kg
#13-1044: 2.92 kg

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 31, 2013

On May 31, the six bear cubs in Flight Pen 1 were moved to Bear Pen 1.  This was no simple move – the feisty bears needed to be weighed and re-marked prior to moving.  The veterinary team decided the safest way to do this would be to sedate the bear cubs first, since they are becoming increasingly dangerous to handle!

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 29, 2013

Video update:

This GoPro video was filmed on May 23.  The cubs featured in this video are the "Flight Pen 1 cubs" -- the six larger cubs residing at the Wildlife Center.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 27, 2013

After the May 25 departure of the Syrian Brown Bear cub, the rehabilitation staff and students thoroughly disinfected Bear Pen 2.  On May 26, the “Flight Pen 2 bears” – the smaller cubs -- were moved to Bear Pen 2.  Black Bear cubs #13-0889 and #13-1044 were also placed in Bear Pen 2 – both are now drinking formula twice a day.  That means the eight cubs in Bear Pen 2 include:

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 22, 2013

The eight bear cubs housed in Bear Pen 1 were moved today to Flight Pen 1 – to make room for Black Bear yearling #13-0977.  To help manage the “bear chaos”, certified wildlife rehabilitator Kelli moved two of the cubs in with the FP2 bear cubs.  This means that the cubs are currently split into two groups of six – based on size.

FP1 cubs:

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 21, 2013

The two groups of Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center – consisting of 12 healthy cubs that are living outdoors – are all doing well.  Sunday’s weigh-in revealed that all are gaining weight – and some are getting quite large!

Bear Pen 1 group:

#13-0389: 5.80 kg
#13-0425: 3.40 kg
#13-0450: 8.20 kg
#13-0469: 7.90 kg
#13-0470: 7.20 kg
#13-0471: 6.00 kg
#13-0646: 3.80 kg
#13-0663: 7.00 kg

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 16, 2013

The eight Black Bear cubs in Bear Pen 1 are doing well – they continue to thrive.  Kelli, one of the Center’s certified wildlife rehabilitators, wore the GoPro cam on May 14 for the afternoon bear feeding.  Those who watched the first GoPro video will see quite a difference in the cubs’ behaviors – they are getting bigger, and more wild! 

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 13, 2013

The eight Black Bear cubs residing at the Wildlife Center are doing well – all are eating and gaining weight.  The bears had a bi-weekly weigh-in on Sunday, May 12:

#13-0389: 4.90 kg
#13-0435: 2.60 kg
#13-0450: 5.70 kg
#13-0469: 6.70 kg
#13-0470: 6.50 kg
#13-0471: 4.90 kg
#13-0646: 2.70 kg
#13-0663: 5.50 kg

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 7, 2013

On May 7, Black Bear cub #13-0663 was cleared to move to Bear Pen 1 with the other seven cubs.  This newest bear will be enclosed in a crate in the bear pen as a means of introduction – within a couple of days, the bear cub will be allowed to mingle with its new brothers and sister.  The cub currently weighs 4.40 kgs.  The staff and students are currently bottle-feeding the bear twice a day; they are working on transitioning the bear to drinking formula from a bowl.

In 2013, the Wildlife Center admitted a record number of Black Bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia.  Some of these cubs were orphaned, some were separated from their mothers, and others were found and kept by people for a short period of time. 

Latest Update: May 6, 2013

On May 5, the rehabilitation staff re-calculated the amount of formula for each bear cub based off of the latest weigh-in results.  The most current weights are:

Black Bear #13-0389: 3.50 kg
Black Bear #13-0425: 2.00 kg
Black Bear #13-0450: 4.30 kg
Black Bear #13-0469:  5.20 kg
Black Bear #13-0470: 4.50 kg
Black Bear #13-0471:  3.70 kg

Red-tailed Hawk #14-0112

On February 19, a Red-tailed Hawk was found down on the ground in New Market, Virginia. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and captured the hawk; a volunteer transporter brought the hawk to the Center that same evening.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

On April 14, Red-tailed Hawk #14-0112 was released in Quicksburg, Virginia, by volunteer transporter and outreach docent Shelly Hokanson. The bird was very feisty and once the crate door was opened, it briefly observed its surroundings before taking flight. The hawk flew off low but quickly gained altitude, and then perched in a nearby tree. Below is a video of the release. 

On February 19, a Red-tailed Hawk was found down on the ground in New Market, Virginia. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and captured the hawk; a volunteer transporter brought the hawk to the Center that same evening.

Latest Update: April 7, 2014

On March 31, Red-tailed Hawk #14-0012 began live-prey testing, which is also known as “mouse school”. The hawk was unsuccessful capturing its prey for the first two nights; however the bird passed the third night. Instead of taking a break between the next round of mouse school, the rehabilitation staff decided to continue the live-prey testing for the next three days. Each day, the bird was able to hunt and capture its prey and on March 5, it passed its final day of live-prey testing. The veterinary staff drew blood for its pre-release evaluation and test results were unremarkable.

On February 19, a Red-tailed Hawk was found down on the ground in New Market, Virginia. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and captured the hawk; a volunteer transporter brought the hawk to the Center that same evening.

Latest Update: March 31, 2014

Red-tailed Hawk #14-0112 has continued its daily flight conditioning sessions during the past two weeks. While the hawk consistently exceeded the number of optimal level of flight passes in mid-March, the hawk showed little progress in flight quality. During the past two weeks of flight conditioning sessions, the bird gradually improved in its flying abilities – better maneuvering, consistent gliding, and tucking its feet when it flies.

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Black Bear cubs #14-0252 and #14-0253

On April 7, the Wildlife Center admitted two Black Bear cubs. The cubs were found after their mother was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia.

Upon admission, Dr. Kristin Britton, diagnostic intern Kelli, and two veterinary externs examined the cubs. Cub 14-0252, a female, weighed in at 3.23 kg. Cub #14-0253, a male, weighed 4.68 kg. Both cubs were bright, alert, and healthy.

The cubs will likely be introduced to cub #14-0224 this week.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

Bear cubs #14-0252 and #14-0253 are bright and alert – and are definitely a handful! Since the cubs’ admissions, the rehabilitation staff has been feeding the two bears three times a day. While Kelli and Amber began bottle-feeding the cubs, both rehabilitators have been working hard during the past week to transition the cubs to lapping thickened formula from a bowl.

Black Bear cub #14-0224

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

Bear cub #14-0224 experienced a small setback last week after she aspirated a small amount of formula. The cub was reluctant to eat for a couple of days, although the bear improved greatly after a course of antibiotics and oxygen therapy. The cub is currently eating well, and the staff rehabilitators are working hard to transition the young cub to drinking formula out of a bowl.

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 8, 2014

Black Bear cub #14-0224 has settled in at the Wildlife Center and is taking her bottles well. The rehabilitation staff began feeding the cub four times a day last week; because feeding is going well, the bear was moved to a three time a day schedule today. The cub gained weight and now weighs 1.855 kg. 

Here is a video compilation of two feedings – wildlife rehabilitation intern Jordan feeds the cub in the first half of the video; certified wildlife rehabilitator Kelli feeds the cub in the second part.
 

Turkey Vulture #14-0083

On February 4, an adult Turkey Vulture was found lying by the side of the road in Orange County, Virginia. A veterinarian rescued the bird; the vulture was transported to the Center by Dr. Dave McRuer.

Latest Update: April 10, 2014

The veterinary and rehabilitation staff have observed Turkey Vulture #14-0083 in the large flight pen to determine if the bird is able to appropriately perch. The bird has been perching and flying well, and it seems to be compensating for the difference in length between the right and left legs.

Purple Gallinule #14-0204

On the evening of April 2, a Waynesboro resident called the Wildlife Center. He had a “crazy bird” in his backyard by a small stream – and it was being stalked by a cat. Wildlife rehabilitation intern Kelsey and new intern Jordan went to investigate on their way home.

Latest Update: April 8, 2014

On April 5, the Purple Gallinule received its last dose of antibiotics and the veterinary staff cleared the bird for release. The following day, two wildlife rehabilitators transported the Gallinule to the Tidewater area for release. Due to a number of storms in the area, rehabbers Dana and Linda kept the bird overnight and released it on Monday, April 7 at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

On the evening of April 2, a Waynesboro resident called the Wildlife Center. He had a “crazy bird” in his backyard by a small stream – and it was being stalked by a cat. Wildlife rehabilitation intern Kelsey and new intern Jordan went to investigate on their way home.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Purple Gallinule #14-0204 was moved to the Center’s aviary yesterday, since this quiet area should be less stressful for the delicate patient. 

Black Bear #14-0184

During the week of March 24, a thin yearling was seen hanging around a campground in Botetourt County. Due to the appearance of the bear, campground officials contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The bear was captured on March 27 and was transported to the Center on March 28.

Dr. Rich, the Center’s veterinary fellow, anesthetized the bear for a physical examination. Radiographs and blood work were also performed; no significant injuries were found. The female bear weighed 7.46 kg – she was thin, but not emaciated.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Black Bears #14-0142 and #14-0184 were caught up today for a weigh-in and blood draw. Both were very feisty and appeared to be in good body condition. Black Bear #14-0142 weighed in at 14.3 kg; Black Bear #14-0184 was 10.1 kg. Both yearlings were moved to yard #2 of the Black Bear Complex.

Black Bear #14-0142

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Black Bears #14-0142 and #14-0184 were caught up today for a weigh-in and blood draw. Both were very feisty and appeared to be in good body condition. Black Bear #14-0142 weighed in at 14.3 kg; Black Bear #14-0184 was 10.1 kg. Both yearlings were moved to yard #2 of the Black Bear Complex.

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

On March 21, the Wildlife Center staff caught Black Bears #14-0126 and #14-0142 in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Both bears were given a quick physical examination and were weighed; both proved to be difficult to capture – they wanted nothing to do with people!

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 14, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0142 remains bright, alert, and feisty and continues to show improvement. On March 12, the yearling was switched to a regular bear meal and she immediately went to her food bowl when returned to her enclosure. After the staff confirmed that the bear was eating well on her own and blood work showed improvements, the yearling was moved to the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation and joined Black Bear yearling #14-0126.

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 10, 2014

On Saturday, March 8, Dr. Kristin anesthetized Black Bear yearling #14-0142 for a complete examination. Dr. Kristin found the bear to be thin and dehydrated, with no visible injuries. The female bear weighed in at 5.73 kg. Radiographs revealed no fractures, but did indicate some changes in the bear’s gastrointestinal tract – Dr. Kristin suspects that the bear’s intestinal system had slowed and was not moving food along as it should, due to a prolonged period of not eating.

Virginia Opossum #14-0073

On January 31, an adult female Virginia Opossum was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-0073 after being attacked by a dog.

The opossum presented with swelling and bruising of both shoulders, an abrasion on the nose, multiple puncture wounds on the chest, and difficulty breathing. On intake, the biggest concerns for the opossum’s recovery were the possible injuries that affected the lungs and the possibility of infection after being in the dog’s mouth – the bacteria found in a dog’s mouth can cause serious infections.

Latest Update: April 3, 2014

On March 31, Virginia Opossum #14-0073 was cleared for release. Her fur had started to grow in well, and the warmer spring weather meant that there was no longer a concern that she will be exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

On April 2, the initial rescuer transported the opossum to Rockingham County for release. The rescuer took care to select a release site far from the road and near abundant food and water sources.

Here are two photos from the release:

On January 31, an adult female Virginia Opossum was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-0073 after being attacked by a dog.

The opossum presented with swelling and bruising of both shoulders, an abrasion on the nose, multiple puncture wounds on the chest, and difficulty breathing. On intake, the biggest concerns for the opossum’s recovery were the possible injuries that affected the lungs and the possibility of infection after being in the dog’s mouth – the bacteria found in a dog’s mouth can cause serious infections.

Latest Update: March 19, 2014

Opossum #14-0073 has been thriving in an outdoor enclosure in the Center’s mammal complex. Her appetite has remained strong, and the wildlife rehabilitators have reported that the opossum has been active and climbing well.

Because the patient needed to have a large portion of her body hair shaved off to care for her injuries, opossum #14-0073 will remain at the Center until early April, when her fur has had time to grow in and there is no longer a threat of extreme weather.

 

On January 31, an adult female Virginia Opossum was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-0073 after being attacked by a dog.

The opossum presented with swelling and bruising of both shoulders, an abrasion on the nose, multiple puncture wounds on the chest, and difficulty breathing. On intake, the biggest concerns for the opossum’s recovery were the possible injuries that affected the lungs and the possibility of infection after being in the dog’s mouth – the bacteria found in a dog’s mouth can cause serious infections.

Latest Update: February 21, 2014

Opossum #14-0073’s wounds continue to heal well. Her appetite has been mostly strong, and her attitude has been bright. Following a week of acclimation, the opossum was able to move to the Center’s outdoor metal cage complex on February 14.

Black Bear cub #14-0018

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: February 21, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0018 was caught up today for repeat blood work and an examination. The team decided last week that once the bear reached 10.0 kg, they would move the yearling to the Bear Complex. Today, bear #14-0018 weighed in at 11.3 kg. Dr. Kristin said that the bear is in very good body condition, and is actually “like a little butterball.”

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: February 7, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0018 was caught and anesthetized for radiographs today. Dr. Kristin was also able to provide a physical examination, and carefully manipulated the bear’s hind legs while she was under anesthesia.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: February 3, 2014

The veterinary and rehabilitation staff observed Black Bear #14-0018 via webcam throughout the weekend. Dr. Kristin is fairly pleased with how well the small bear is getting around on her injured hind leg. While the bear’s gait is not what would be considered “normal”, #14-0018 appears to be adapting to her old injury and can maneuver well. The bear is able to run and climb, and with her current level of activity, the veterinary team do not believe she is uncomfortable.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: January 31, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0018 continues to make improvements each day. On January 30, Dr. Kristin listened to the bear’s lungs again and noted that the bear’s right lung field sounds much better. The bear is feisty and is eating well, so the veterinary team decided to prepare to move the bear to the Large Mammal enclosure on January 31.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: January 27, 2014

Dr. Kristin reports that Black Bear #14-0018 has been much more feisty and difficult to handle over the past few days. The bear is now eating regular bear meal on her own, and currently weights 6.15 kg – an increase of more than five pounds from her admission weight.

On January 26, the bear was anesthetized for follow-up radiographs. Dr. Kristin noted that the “crackles” heard in the bear’s right lung are only minor at this point; radiographs confirmed improvement. Antibiotic treatment continues.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: January 20, 2014

Dr. Kristin notes that Black Bear #14-0018 has been slightly brighter and more feisty over the past weekend. The veterinary team began offering canned A/D, a digestible food designed for the nutritional support of dogs and cats recovering from serious illness, accident, and surgery. When the bear demonstrated that she was willing to eat the food on her own throughout the weekend, Dr. Kristin removed the esophagostomy tube on January 20. The bear will continue to eat this special diet twice a day for the next few days.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: January 16, 2014

Black Bear #14-0018 was anesthetized for radiographs today. Dr. Rich Sim, the Center’s veterinary fellow, noted that the bear’s lungs looked clearer on radiographs – a sign that the pneumonia is responding to treatment. Dr. Rich also listened to the bear’s chest; while there were still “crackles” heard on the bear’s right side, there was an improvement noted, and Dr. Rich did not hear the troubling cough that the bear demonstrated earlier in the week.

On January 9, a small Black Bear cub was seen in a field beside Alleghany High School in Covington, Virginia. The cub appeared to be lethargic, the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted, and a conservation police officer responded to the scene. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center on the morning of January 10.

Dr. Kristin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when it arrived. The female cub, patient #14-0018, is emaciated and dehydrated – weighing in at just 3.8 kg.

Latest Update: January 13, 2014

Throughout the weekend, Black Bear #14-0018 has shown slight signs of improvement – while the emaciated cub’s condition remains quite guarded, each day Dr. Kristin noted that the cub became a little brighter. As of Monday, January 13, Dr. Kristin noted that the cub is struggling a little more to get away from humans during treatments – which is a good sign!

Black Bear cubs #13-0469 and 13-0470

On the afternoon of April 17, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a vehicle in Greene County, Virginia. Her two cubs were present and quickly climbed a tree.  Several officials responded to the scene and were able to extract the cubs from the tree; a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the two cubs to the Wildlife Center that same evening.

Latest Update: January 24, 2014

On January 24, the first of several Black Bear releases began. Five bears in transition area #2 were successfully darted and anesthetized by Wildlife Center staff and DGIF biologists. Circular ear tags were placed in both ears of each bear, and the bears were scanned for microchips. Bears #13-0425, #13-1266, #13-1044, #13-0469, and an un-scannable female were loaded into a large bear trap. The veterinary team provided the bears with a reversal medication before the doors were locked and the trap was loaded onto the DGIF truck.

On the afternoon of April 17, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a vehicle in Greene County, Virginia. Her two cubs were present and quickly climbed a tree.  Several officials responded to the scene and were able to extract the cubs from the tree; a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the two cubs to the Wildlife Center that same evening.

Latest Update: April 30, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center and are currently housed together in Bear Pen 1.  They have access to the entire den and pen area of the Bear Pen and have several logs and trees for climbing practice.   As of April 30 … the bears will be on Critter Cam!

On the afternoon of April 17, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a vehicle in Greene County, Virginia. Her two cubs were present and quickly climbed a tree.  Several officials responded to the scene and were able to extract the cubs from the tree; a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the two cubs to the Wildlife Center that same evening.

Latest Update: April 24, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well; they have been split into two groups of three.  Black Bears #13-0469, #13-0470, and #13-0471 are one “three-pack” – the two natural brothers that came from Greene County are bottle-fed twice a day and are also beginning to eat a mush bowl.  Cub #13-0471 from Fauquier County is eating three times a day.

Once Bear Pen 1 has been thoroughly disinfected, the cubs will be moved into that enclosure.  The cubs are currently housed together in an airline crate in Flight Pen 2.
 

Black Bear cub #13-2606

On November 9, a Black Bear cub was treed by dogs in Botetourt County, Virginia. When the bear did not come out of the tree after a few days, residents grew concerned and called the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. An officer tranquilized the bear on November 12, and transported it to the Center on November 13.

Latest Update: November 16, 2013

On November 15, Dr. Dave and Kelsey, the Center's rehabilitation intern, moved cub #13-2606 into one side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The other 16 bears were enclosed in the other side, and were able to enter the connecting tunnel between the two pens, so that all bears could get some face-to-face introductions with the newest cub.

On November 9, a Black Bear cub was treed by dogs in Botetourt County, Virginia. When the bear did not come out of the tree after a few days, residents grew concerned and called the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. An officer tranquilized the bear on November 12, and transported it to the Center on November 13.

Latest Update: November 14, 2013

Black Bear cub #13-2606 remains bright and feisty. The team is not overly concerned with the cub’s broken canine – radiographs clearly reveal that this tooth is a deciduous [“baby”] tooth, and will soon be replaced by an adult tooth.

Black Bear #13-0471

On the morning of April 17, Animal Control officers in Fauquier County saw a young bear cub wandering near the side of the road.  The officers decided to leave the cub alone, suspecting that the mother bear was nearby.  By late afternoon, the cub was still by himself.  Because a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer was planning on bringing two other Black Bear cubs to the Center, the Fauquier County cub was rescued and sent along with the other cubs.

Latest Update: April 30, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center and are currently housed together in Bear Pen 1.  They have access to the entire den and pen area of the Bear Pen and have several logs and trees for climbing practice.   As of April 30 … the bears will be on Critter Cam!

On the morning of April 17, Animal Control officers in Fauquier County saw a young bear cub wandering near the side of the road.  The officers decided to leave the cub alone, suspecting that the mother bear was nearby.  By late afternoon, the cub was still by himself.  Because a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer was planning on bringing two other Black Bear cubs to the Center, the Fauquier County cub was rescued and sent along with the other cubs.

Latest Update: April 24, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well; they have been split into two groups of three.  Black Bears #13-0469, #13-0470, and #13-0471 are one “three-pack” – the two natural brothers that came from Greene County are bottle-fed twice a day and are also beginning to eat a mush bowl.  Cub #13-0471 from Fauquier County is eating three times a day.

Once Bear Pen 1 has been thoroughly disinfected, the cubs will be moved into that enclosure.  The cubs are currently housed together in an airline crate in Flight Pen 2.
 

Black Bear cub #13-0450

On April 13, a Black Bear sow and three cubs were spotted at Sherando Lake in Augusta County, Virginia.  The bears were spooked by people; two cubs ran off with the mother while one cub climbed a tree.  The lone cub was still by itself on the morning of April 16, so a forest ranger transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 30, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center and are currently housed together in Bear Pen 1.  They have access to the entire den and pen area of the Bear Pen and have several logs and trees for climbing practice.   As of April 30 … the bears will be on Critter Cam!

On April 13, a Black Bear sow and three cubs were spotted at Sherando Lake in Augusta County, Virginia.  The bears were spooked by people; two cubs ran off with the mother while one cub climbed a tree.  The lone cub was still by itself on the morning of April 16, so a forest ranger transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 24, 2013

All six Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well; they have been split into two groups of three.  Black Bears #13-0425, 13-0389, and 13-0450 are one “three-pack” – all are bottle-fed three times a day.  The rehab staff are also working on getting them to lap formula from a bowl – in hopes of reducing the number of bottle feedings again over the next week.  Bear cub #13-0425 with the injured toe is doing well – the bandage fell off several days after Dr. Dana applied it, but the toe is in good alignment and does not need further care.

Black Bear #14-0301

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Eastern Screech-Owl #14-0262

On April 9, an Eastern Screech-Owl was admitted as patient #14-0262. A homeowner discovered the owl inside an old chicken coop with two of her neighbor’s dogs, and the dogs were observed pawing at the owl. The homeowner rescued the owl from the dogs and transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

During the initial exam at the Center, the owl was bright, alert, and in good body condition. Though several tail feathers were missing, there were no obvious physical abnormalities or injuries.

Black Vulture #14-0153

For two days in mid-March, passersby noticed a Black Vulture along route 29 in Charlottesville. The vulture appeared distressed and unable to fly, and it was suspected that bird had been hit by a car. A local wildlife rehabilitator rescued the bird and transported the patient to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. The vulture was admitted on March 14 as patient #14-0153.

Great Horned Owlet #14-0255

On April 4, a Great Horned Owlet was found alone in a backyard in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The owlet was rescued by two permitted wildlife rehabilitators after it could not be successfully reunited with its parents. After four days in the rehabilitators’ care, the owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center on April 8 to be raised by the Center’s Great Horned Owl surrogate.

Bald Eagle #14-0144

On March 7, a sub-adult Bald Eagle was found down on the ground at an airport in Newport News, Virginia. Personnel at the airport were able to safely contain the bird; volunteer transporters drove the injured bird to the Wildlife Center that same day.

Black Bear cubs #13-0874, 13-0875, and 13-0876

On Saturday, May 11, a homeowner in Augusta County called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when a Black Bear sow was found dead near a road – and her three young cubs were spotted in a nearby tree.  The sow was likely hit by a vehicle.  The DGIF officer collected the young bears and brought them to the Wildlife Center on May 13.

Black Bear #13-0663

On May 1, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub – bringing the current count of bears at the Wildlife Center to 10. 

Black Bear cub #13-0663, a male, was confiscated from a family by the local sheriff’s office in Botetourt County.  The family found the cub in early April and kept it for a month.  A Department of Game & Inland Fisheries Officer transported the cub to the Center.

Black Bear cub #13-0646

Black Bear #13-0646, the ninth Black Bear admitted to the Wildlife Center in 2013, was admitted on April 30.  The cub was found several days ago by a family in Floyd County; a Department of Game & Inland Fisheries officer transported the small male cub to the Wildlife Center.