Current Patients

Bald Eagle #16-0038

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 5, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 is recovering quietly at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Dana reports that the eagle is perching, eating well, and mostly leaving her bandages alone, which can be an important component of the healing process! The eagle’s heart rate has been within normal limits during the past two days.

The veterinary team continues to clean the eagle’s foot and face wounds daily; all lacerations are currently static. Repeat radiographs are scheduled for February 13.

Bald Eagle #15-2199

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: February 1, 2016

On February 1, Bald Eagle #15-2199 was anesthetized for 35-day post-op radiographs on her leg. Radiographs indicated more complete bridging between the fractured bones; the IM pin was ready to be removed. The external fixator pins need to remain in place for another week to ensure that the fracture site will remain stable.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: January 25, 2016

During the past two-and-a-half weeks, the veterinary staff continued to monitor Bald Eagle #15-2199. Each day, the veterinarians cleaned the surgical site and applied antibiotic ointment before replacing the eagle’s padded bandage. The eagle continued to use her left leg more each day and has been very feisty.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: January 8, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-2199 continues to slowly recover from her leg surgery. Following surgery, the veterinary staff has checked and cleaned the surgery site each day and has tested the bird’s leg range of motion. Three days after the procedure, it was noted that the acrylic bar between two external fixators used to hold the intramedullary pin in the bird’s leg in place was broken.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: December 28, 2015

On December 24, Bald Eagle #15-2199 was moved to flight pen A3. The bird was able to make some low flights in the flight area, and on Christmas Day, was behaving appropriately. The following morning, rehabilitation intern Kendra noticed that the bird was on the ground and unable to hop to the A-frame perch; the bird was also favoring her left leg. Dr. Dana examined the bird and found that the eagle had fractured her leg. Dr.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

On December 21, the veterinary staff evaluated Bald Eagle #15-2199 and performed and foot-and-feather check. Overall, the bird’s feet and feathers looked good, and the eagle was doing well in the outdoor C-pen. Dr. Dana felt it was appropriate to move the eagle to a larger enclosure. The bird was moved to flight pen A2 and will begin daily exercise on December 29.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: December 16, 2015

On November 28, Dr. Helen performed follow-up radiographs on Bald Eagle #15-2199’s left wing. Radiographs confirmed that there was a large, firm callus forming, and the fracture site was healing well.

The veterinary staff continued to monitor the ESF [external skeletal fixation] pins daily and change the bird’s bandages every three days. Laser therapy was also performed every three days.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-2199 has been bright, alert, and feisty since her surgery earlier this month. On November 16, Dr. Dana took radiographs of the eagle’s fractured wing for a 14-day post-op check; she was pleased to find that calluses were present at the fracture sites. The major metacarpal bone fragments are well-aligned; the minor metacarpal bone fragments are mildly displaced, though are healing well at this time.

On October 24, an adult female Bald Eagle in Virginia Beach flew into a tree and fell to the ground during what was likely a territory dispute with another eagle. It took three animal control officers to capture the bird before she was brought to a local rehabilitator, who stabilized the eagle. The rehabilitator noted blood on the bird’s head, and wounds on the left wing and leg.

Latest Update: November 5, 2015

On November 2, veterinary intern Dr. Dana performed surgery on Bald Eagle #15-2199 to repair the fractured wing. During surgery, Dr. Dana placed pins and an external fixator to stabilize the fractured bone. Surgery went well, and a bandage was applied following surgery to keep the fractured wing in place.

Bald Eagle #16-0028

On January 27, a mature Bald Eagle was hit by a car in Sussex County, Virginia. The bird was captured by a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologist, who took the eagle to a local veterinary clinic for stabilization. A Wildlife Center volunteer transporter drove the Bald Eagle to the Wildlife Center on January 28.

Latest Update: February 1, 2016

On January 27, Drs. Helen and Dana took Bald Eagle #16-0028 to surgery to repair the bird’s ulna fracture. Dr. Helen was able to place the intramedullary pin through the bird’s fractured bone, though the bruised and swollen wing complicated the fracture repair. In the middle of surgery, the eagle suddenly became very warm and began breathing rapidly, which is unusual for birds on a high level of gas anesthesia. The bird’s heart rate also increased suddenly.

Bald Eaglet #15-0733

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

After several weeks of rest following imping, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was started on daily exercise in flight pen A3 (along with Bald Eagle #15-1339) on January 28.

Rehabilitation intern Kendra reported that the eagle had poor stamina and maneuvering the first two days of exercise, but this is not unexpected as the eagle becomes re-accustomed to the larger enclosure. The staff will continue to exercise the eagle daily.
 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 4, 2016

On December 24, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was brought into to the Wildlife Center’s hospital for his imping procedure. Seven feathers [five primaries and two secondary feathers] were replaced on the left wing and four feathers [two primaries and two secondary] were replaced on the right wing. The team also replaced eight tail feathers. During the procedure, the team also noted that the eagle had a several flight feathers in “blood”, indicating that these feathers were growing in on their own.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in the FP4 flight pen during the last month. On December 17, one of the Center’s A-pens [A2] became available, and the young eagle was moved to the larger enclosure. Since Bald Eagle #15-0733 is now in a larger flight pen and the likelihood of causing feather damage is minimized, the veterinary staff scheduled the eagle’s imping [feather replacement] procedure for December 24.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

During the past two months, Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in a small enclosure.  On November 10, the young bird was moved to a slightly larger enclosure – FP4.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: September 10, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 still has not been seen flying much. Repeat radiographs performed on September 7 were largely unremarkable and shows that the fracture site continues to heal. The staff noticed that the bird had many broken tail and wing feathers and decided to move Bald Eaglet #15-0733 to the A3 tower to prevent further damage to the feathers.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well.  Both are eating and gaining weight. 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 24, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s daily physical therapy sessions have gone well during the past week. During each physical therapy session, one of the veterinarians extends the eagle’s wing to stretch the muscles and ligaments in the wing.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

Follow-up radiographs of Bald Eagle #15-0733’s healing wing were taken on June 4; they revealed that a callus was continuing to form over the fracture sites. Dr. Meghan noted, however, that the bird’s wing was severely contacted. The bird’s bandage was removed to allow the young eagle to extend its wing; daily physical therapy sessions were scheduled.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 was anesthetized for radiographs on May 29. Dr. Meghan found that calluses were forming on both wing fractures, though there were signs of osteomyelitis

Bald Eaglet #15-1339

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

On January 5, Bald Eagle #15-1339 had radiographs taken to recheck the swelling in the bird’s right wing. Dr. Helen saw no abnormalities; the eagle was cleared to move to a smaller enclosure [C-pen] before moving back to a large flight pen for exercise.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: December 29, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #15-1339’s quality of flight has declined. The young bird was exercising fairly well in mid-December, and averaging about 12-15 passes during each daily exercise session. Toward the end of each session, wildlife rehabilitator Leighann noted that the bird’s wings did not appear symmetrical and that one wing was working a little harder than the other. Within the past week, the bird flew fewer passes during each session and was struggling to gain height.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: December 17, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1339 continues to exercise daily and during the past few weeks, the bird’s stamina has improved. The bird’s flight continues to improve though still needs improvement before release is considered. At this point, the eagle flies an average of 10-15 passes in the flight enclosure and still needs to improve in height and lift. On December 16, the eagle was moved to flight pen A1, along with Bald Eagle #15-0355.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1339 is still flying inconsistently during daily exercise – getting tired quickly some days, flapping instead of gliding, or flying to the ground rather than a perch.

The eagle’s imped feathers remain intact, though some of the feathers on the left wing are tattered or broken. The bird occasionally has a left wing droop during and after exercise; Dr. Helen took radiographs on November 9 to identify any abnormalities, but the results were unremarkable.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: November 5, 2015

On October 29, the veterinary staff performed the imping procedure on Bald Eagle #15-1339. Feathers were replaced on both of the eagle’s wings as well as its tail, user donor feathers from two different Bald Eagles. Three days later, Bald Eagle #15-1339 resumed daily exercise.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: October 27, 2015

On October 6, a backpack GPS transmitter was placed on Bald Eagle #15-1339. Following placement of the backpack, the staff continued to exercise the eagle to ensure the bird was able to easily fly with the new device attached.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: October 2, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1261, #15-1319, and #15-1339 have all been flying well – at least on days when it hasn’t been raining heavily! The birds are starting to achieve their “optimum level” of flight – 15 or more passes during each exercise session.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1312 and 15-1339 have been doing well in flight pen A3 during the past week. As many Critter Cam viewers have noted, the eaglets are still young and spend some of the time laying down on the ground to rest and sleep.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 1, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-1312 has been eating well during the past few days and has gained weight; the bird now weighs 3.97 kg. The young eagle is very alert and feisty, and on July 1, was moved to flight pen A3.

Peregrine Falcon #15-2167

On October 13, an adult male Peregrine Falcon was found down on the ground in a residential neighborhood in King William County, Virginia. A construction crew found the injured bird and called for help. The falcon was taken to Cary Street Veterinary Hospital in downtown Richmond before he was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

Peregrine Falcon #15-2167 has been doing well during the past six weeks. The bird’s bumblefoot has improved, however the papillae are flat on the falcon’s central foot pads, requiring the continuation of bandaging both feet.

On October 13, an adult male Peregrine Falcon was found down on the ground in a residential neighborhood in King William County, Virginia. A construction crew found the injured bird and called for help. The falcon was taken to Cary Street Veterinary Hospital in downtown Richmond before he was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: December 11, 2015

During the past two weeks, the veterinary staff has been carefully managing Peregrine Falcon #15-2167. To treat the bird’s bumblefoot, three perches have been rotated in and out of the bird’s crate – a flat perch, a toilet paper perch (which is soft and molds to the bird’s feet), and a pebble perch.

On October 13, an adult male Peregrine Falcon was found down on the ground in a residential neighborhood in King William County, Virginia. A construction crew found the injured bird and called for help. The falcon was taken to Cary Street Veterinary Hospital in downtown Richmond before he was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 24, 2015

For the past month, the staff has been performing physical therapy on the falcon’s wing every three days in an effort to prevent the joint, muscles, or patagium from permanently contracting. Prior to admission, the falcon had an injury to his patagium, and unfortunately, repeat radiographs of the left wing on November 17 showed that the patagium has not improved despite physical therapy sessions.

On October 13, an adult male Peregrine Falcon was found down on the ground in a residential neighborhood in King William County, Virginia. A construction crew found the injured bird and called for help. The falcon was taken to Cary Street Veterinary Hospital in downtown Richmond before he was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 27, 2015

Peregrine Falcon #15-2167 has been doing well in the days following his surgery. The bird is now readily eating on his own and has gained weight; the vet staff will be monitoring the falcon’s weight, body condition score, and food intake closely to ensure that the bird doesn’t gain too much weight. Regular foot checks are also performed since Peregrine Falcons in captivity can be prone to developing foot issues.

Bald Eagle #15-0355

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

During the week of January 11, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was cage-rested and monitored. The veterinary team was able to keep an eye on the eagle through one of the Wildlife Center’s webcams; the staff continued to note the eagle’s left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 13, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-0355 was exercising well last week, although the bird was not able to attain the optimum level of exercise to be considered for release. Mid-week, the bird’s flight became a little more labored; the veterinary staff adjusted the size of the protective carpal bumpers on the eagle's "wrists" to see if smaller bumpers would make the bird more comfortable. Toward the end of the week, the eagle displayed an intermittent left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 6, 2016

During the past 10 days, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has continued to fly well during daily exercise. The staff and students report that she is regularly making 10-12 passes in flight pen A1 before becoming tired, showing an increase in stamina. The eagle will continue with daily exercise and needs to reach the optimum level of 15 passes end-to-end consistently for at least a week before consideration for release.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 28, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been flying well during the past few weeks in flight pen A1. Wildlife rehabilitator Leighann began pushing the eagle to the “optimum exercise level” on December 27 and said that the eagle is doing well, but needs a little bit more work on stamina. As long as exercise goes well during the next couple of weeks, the staff hope that the eagle will be able to be released in 2016. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 9, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has made slow and steady improvement in the past three weeks. The bird is now consistently flying 10 passes end-to-end and has been able to gain and maintain good height during exercise sessions. The eagle’s stamina has also increased, but Bald Eagle #15-0355 has yet to reach optimal level [15 passes end-to-end] and will continue with daily exercise sessions to improve her conditioning in the upcoming weeks.  

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 during the past two weeks. The eagle is still not flying well consistently but has shown some improvement. The eagle often becomes tired or stubborn during exercise sessions and gains only moderate height in flight, but is making more passes and better height than earlier this month.

A feet and feather exam on November 16 showed several broken feather tips, but the eagle is in good body condition overall.

Daily exercise will continue, giving the eagle more time to gain strength and stamina.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 6, 2015

On October 22, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to flight pen A2. After several days of adjusting to the larger space, the rehabilitation staff started daily exercise sessions with the eagle. At this point, the eagle is not flying well, though several weeks of conditioning will be needed to determine if there are permanent flight deficits due to the eagle’s injuries. The staff report that the eagle is able to fly a total of about six to seven passes right now, mostly at low altitudes. Exercise will continue during the month of November.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 11, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been lightly exercised by the rehabilitation staff. Though the bird has made some improvement in her ability to fly, she is still not flying very well.

On September 11, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #15-0355 to the tower in A3 for further rest and recovery, where the eagle now shares an enclosure with eaglet #15-0733.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 7, 2015

The veterinary staff have been doing a fair amount of “eagle shuffling” this summer – with 9-10 Bald Eagle patients in care all summer long, there has been a lot of bird-moving to ensure that the eagles that are closest to release can be safely exercised and prepared for life back in the wild.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been doing well during the past month and has a good appetite – the bird seems to prefer rat versus fish for daily meals.

On July 27, the veterinary staff noticed a small lesion on the eagle’s right wing and applied ointment and a bandage. The staff also noted that the eagle was molting several of her primary and tail feathers – typical for eagles in late summer.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been living with eaglets #15-1250 and #15-1348 during the past couple of weeks. While the adult eagle has not been regularly exercised since the addition of the young eagles, the staff note that the bird still struggles to get lift during flight, and often has trouble flying to high perches. With the eaglets growing and needing more room for exercise of their own, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to a smaller outdoor enclosure.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 22, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 daily. At first it seemed that the eagle was making slight improvements during sessions; however, the bird still has difficulty maintaining flight and is only able to make two to four passes. The eagle also frequently hops along the ground instead of flying during exercise sessions. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and monitor its flying abilities. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has been exercising Bald Eagle #15-0355 in flight pen A1 for the past ten days. During daily exercise sessions, the eagle has poor stamina and cannot gain height during flight; rather than fly end-to-end in the enclosure, the eagle often hops along the ground and cannot fly up to the perches. The eagle has been observed on the Critter Cam as spending most of her time on the lower A-frame perch.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 (wearing high-heel duct tape bumpers) has been monitored in the large outdoor enclosure during the past two weeks. The eagle has been maneuvering around the enclosure but has difficulty flying to the higher perches.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 21, 2015

After moving Bald Eagle #15-0355 to an outdoor pen on May 8, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff monitored the eagle for a left wing droop. The eagle was maneuvering well around the small outdoor enclosure [C1] and showed no signs of a wing droop, although the bird’s appetite was not strong.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 11, 2015

During the past three weeks, veterinary staff continued to conservatively treat Bald Eagle #15-0355’s broken wing and leg. The veterinary staff performed physical therapy sessions and bandage changes every three days. On April 28, Dr. Meghan carefully re-examined the bird’s wing and leg and noted that swelling was decreasing at both fracture sites.

Peregrine Falcon #15-2336

On December 29, a Peregrine Falcon was found injured in Hampton, Virginia. The bird was picked up by Hampton Animal Control and taken to permitted rehabilitator Lisa Barlow. Lisa found that the falcon had an open fracture on the right wing, which she stabilized and bandaged. The bird was driven to the Wildlife Center early the following morning by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

During the past week, the vet staff have continued to treat the extensive wound on Peregrine Falcon #15-2336’s injured wing. Day-to-day, it is difficult to appreciate small changes and improvements, but after 10 days of careful treatments, Drs. Helen and Dana believe that the falcon’s wound is improving and is slowly getting smaller.

On December 29, a Peregrine Falcon was found injured in Hampton, Virginia. The bird was picked up by Hampton Animal Control and taken to permitted rehabilitator Lisa Barlow. Lisa found that the falcon had an open fracture on the right wing, which she stabilized and bandaged. The bird was driven to the Wildlife Center early the following morning by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: January 19, 2016

The veterinary team continues to debride Peregrine Falcon #15-2336’s wound every day under anesthesia. Unfortunately, the vets don’t have much to work with; they would like to suture the wound closed, but not enough skin is present around the bird's wound. On January 18, a different kind of topical ointment was used after the daily debridement; Dr. Helen said she was pleasantly surprised on the morning of January 19 when she examined the wound.

On December 29, a Peregrine Falcon was found injured in Hampton, Virginia. The bird was picked up by Hampton Animal Control and taken to permitted rehabilitator Lisa Barlow. Lisa found that the falcon had an open fracture on the right wing, which she stabilized and bandaged. The bird was driven to the Wildlife Center early the following morning by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: January 13, 2016

Each day, the veterinary staff check the surgical site on Peregrine Falcon #15-2336. On Sunday, January 12, Dr. Dana found a large area of necrotic skin beginning at one external fixator pin site and extending several centimeters across the wing. Dr. Dana anesthetized the falcon and was able to debride the wound to uncover underlying healthy, pink tissue though she also noted that several secondary feather follicles on the wing were permanently damaged by the necrotic tissue. Dr.

On December 29, a Peregrine Falcon was found injured in Hampton, Virginia. The bird was picked up by Hampton Animal Control and taken to permitted rehabilitator Lisa Barlow. Lisa found that the falcon had an open fracture on the right wing, which she stabilized and bandaged. The bird was driven to the Wildlife Center early the following morning by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: January 8, 2016

Peregrine Falcon #15-2336 continues to heal in the week following his surgery. The veterinary team has been regularly massaging the falcon’s patagium [leading edge of the wing] to prevent contracture and patagial knots.

On December 29, a Peregrine Falcon was found injured in Hampton, Virginia. The bird was picked up by Hampton Animal Control and taken to permitted rehabilitator Lisa Barlow. Lisa found that the falcon had an open fracture on the right wing, which she stabilized and bandaged. The bird was driven to the Wildlife Center early the following morning by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: January 4, 2016

On December 31, Dr. Helen re-checked Peregrine Falcon #15-2336’s blood work prior to surgery. The falcon’s total protein was low, so Dr. Helen decided to postpone surgery a day to ensure that the bird was more stable for the prolonged anesthesia.

Ruddy Duck #16-0020

On January 20, a female Ruddy Duck was found in the parking lot of a recreation center in Christiansburg, Virginia. The duck was rescued and taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center before she was transferred to the Wildlife Center on January 21.

Latest Update: January 27, 2016

Ruddy Duck #16-0020 was released on January 26. The Wildlife Center staff chatted with Sabrina at Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center; everyone agreed it would be best and least stressful for the duck to be released as soon as possible.

Rehabilitation intern Kendra and former rehabilitation intern Jordan took the Ruddy Duck to a body of water in Waynesboro for release.

On January 20, a female Ruddy Duck was found in the parking lot of a recreation center in Christiansburg, Virginia. The duck was rescued and taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center before she was transferred to the Wildlife Center on January 21.

Latest Update: January 26, 2016

Ruddy Duck #16-0020 has been improving since admission; the duck is bright, alert, feisty, and is eating well. She’s gained more than 50 grams in the past four days.

Black Bear cubs of 2015

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: January 27, 2016

The seven Black Bear cubs have been doing well at the Wildlife Center during the past few months. The bears have remained fairly active, despite the recent cold weather – likely because of their plentiful food source. Critter Cam viewers have been able to watch the growing bears eat, wrestle, climb trees, and sleep. The rehabilitation staff regularly provide a variety of enrichment items for the curious cubs, including stuffed pumpkins, Christmas trees, and special food items.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: September 18, 2015

The seven bear cubs have been doing well at the Wildlife Center this summer. As many Critter Cam viewers can attest, the cubs have grown larger – they are clearly eating well! Even “green tag” – female cub #15-1651 – has put on a lot of weight. It took the newest addition a couple of weeks to warm up to her new “brothers”, but the cubs seem to enjoy each other’s company and are often seen napping, eating, and playing together.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: August 6, 2015

During the last week of July, Black Bear cub #15-0224 continued to heal in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-0224 has spent the past eight days (since July 23) in the chute of the Large Mammal Isolation facility to limit his mobility and allow staff to observe his movement. The cub was initially vocal following the separation from his “brothers” but he appears to be settling in. Staff elected not to pair him with a “buddy” in the adjoining enclosure because that would require darting one of the healthy cubs; housing the cub alone will also eliminate the possibility of further injuring the leg in playful wrestling matches.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: July 23, 2015

On July 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that Black Bear cub #15-0224 (no tag) was limping. The cub was favoring his hind right limb and seemed to have limited mobility.

On the afternoon of July 23, the veterinary team sedated the cub and brought him to the hospital for a physical exam and radiographs.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 14, 2015

The Black Bear cub move went well on Sunday, June 14. The bears were shifted into the den of Bear Pen #3 at 8:00 a.m.; Bear Pen #2 was set-up ahead of time as a weighing and examination area. Rehabilitation intern Brittany controlled the guillotine door as Dr. Kelli and Leighann were poised in the main area of pen #3 to catch the cubs, one at a time. From there, the cubs were taken into Bear Pen #2 for a quick examination and a weight.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

After much discussion, the staff has come up with a plan for the six Black Bear cubs. The staff knows that pink tag cub [#15-0504] has ringworm, a contagious fungal infection of the skin. On Sunday, June 14, the vet staff will manually catch and restrain the other five cubs for a quick physical examination. As long as the cubs have no signs of ringworm, they will be moved to the Black Bear Complex that same morning.  The staff will begin at 8:00 a.m. 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 10, 2015

During the past two days, the rehabilitation staff have been preparing yard #1 of the Bear Complex for the arrival of the cubs. Acorns and seed were scattered throughout the half-acre area, and two piece of enrichment “furniture” were added: a hammock and a tire bridge!

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 8, 2015

The six Black Bear cubs have been doing well during the past week. The rehabilitation staff have been slowly weaning the cubs off of their formula “mush bowls”, and as of June 8, the cubs are no longer receiving any type of formula. The cubs are enjoying a wide variety of adult foods, and the rehabilitation staff have been incorporating a lot of food into enrichment activities for the cubs. If you haven’t watched the Critter Cams lately, here’s a video of food enrichment in action!

 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 29, 2015

The bear cubs are doing well; they continue to eat … and eat! At this point, the cubs are still receiving mush bowls twice a day, but that will soon change. The bears are also eating a wide variety of adult foods. Grapes are a particular favorite, but so are berries, seeds, nuts, and fresh leafy branches.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 19, 2015

On Tuesday, May 19, Dr. Kelli opened the sliding door between Bear Pen 2 and Bear Pen 3 – giving the six cubs access to both pens. Bear Pen 2 is set up with a tire swing, and the cam view also captures a view of the “sink” (a popular sleeping spot in BP3).

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 13, 2015

All six Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center – they are eating well and gaining weight! The rehabilitation staff now shift the bears into the den area for food deliveries; the staff rarely have direct contact with the cubs at this point. Dr. Kelli was able to train this shifting behavior through positive reinforcement; food was offered in the den area to get the cubs to shift, but at this point, the bears shift on their own.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 8, 2015

Black Bear cubs #15-0503 and 15-0504 have been drinking their formula out of bowl during the past few days, which means it’s time to introduce them to the four other cubs at the Center. Cub #15-0503 lost a little weight, but wildlife rehabilitator Leighann noted that his sibling, #15-0504, has been hogging the formula dishes. Dr.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 4, 2015

On Monday, May 4, Dr. Meghan and Dr. Kelli re-evaluated Black Bear cub #15-0458. The cub was walking normally, and did not appear to have any issues with his wrists; he had also gained weight and was eating well. With a clean bill of health, the cub was introduced to the other cubs in Bear Pen 3, bringing the current count to four on Cub Cam.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: April 28, 2015

The trio of black bear cubs is doing well – as many Critter Cam viewers can attest, the cubs are an energetic and playful bunch! The bears were weighed on Monday:

Cub #15-0224 (no tag): 4.2 kg
Cub #15-0292 (red tag): 5.1 kg
Cub #15-0354 (yellow tag): 3.1 kg

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: April 23, 2015

The three bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The bears are eating well, and as of April 20, the bears were cut back to twice-a-day bottle feedings. In between feedings they are offered a “mush bowl” consisting of thickened formula, soft dog food, and small pieces of fruit. The bears are weighed twice a week to ensure each cub is eating enough food; on April 23, weights were as follows:

Cub #15-0224 (no tag): 3.8 kg
Cub #15-0292 (red tag): 4.6 kg
Cub #15-0354 (yellow tag): 2.6 kg

Northern Harrier #15-2160

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: January 13, 2016

On January 12, the veterinary staff performed repeat radiographs of Northern Harrier #15-2160’s injured toe. It appears that the toe tip healed in rotated position, which may not cause problems for the bird in the long term.

Dr. Helen noted a scab over the injured toe joint, which indicates there may have been an open wound that could have exposed the bone. Repeat radiographs will be performed on January 19 to identify any potential problems, including bone infection.

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: January 7, 2016

During the month of December, Northern Harrier #15-2160’s left wing injury remained static, and the veterinary staff determined that the bird would be non-releasable.

Before looking for a permanent home for the harrier, the staff felt it was necessary to assess this individual bird to determine if placement was a viable option. Northern Harriers can be challenging birds to work with and manage in captivity, and it is generally appropriate to assess individuals for their viability as education animals.

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: November 18, 2015

After a week of self-exercise in Flight Pen 1, Northern Harrier #15-2160 was caught up for another feet and feather check and follow-up radiographs. The bumblefoot on the hawk’s feet was still present, but otherwise showed no change in condition. The staff cleaned the inflamed footpads and will apply A/D ointment once a day to protect the irritated skin.

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: November 3, 2015

The veterinary staff carefully observed Northern Harrier #15-2160 in B7 during the past seven days. While the harrier was able to fly about its enclosure, the staff consistently noticed a severe left wing droop.

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: October 27, 2015

During the past week, Northern Harrier #15-2160 rested and ate well in its airline crate in the Center’s aviary hallway. The blepharospasm in the hawk’s eye also greatly improved.

On October 12, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient—a Northern Harrier. The juvenile hawk was found down on the ground and unable to fly in Richmond, Virginia and was first taken to AWARE [a coalition of wildlife rehabilitators] on October 9. After receiving supportive care for several days, the bird was taken to Wellesley Animal Hospital where the veterinary staff noted the bird had a left wing droop. The hawk was then transported to the Wildlife Center on the evening of October 12 for additional care.

Latest Update: October 19, 2015

Northern Harrier #15-2160 has been eating well since it was moved to an airline crate in the Center’s aviary hallway. On October 18, the veterinary staff took follow-up radiographs of the bird’s left wing. While Northern Harrier #15-2160 is no longer showing a left wing droop, radiographs revealed that the bird had suffered soft tissue damage to its shoulder as well as trauma to its air sacs. Blepharospasm [involuntary closing of the eyelid] was also still present in the hawk’s left eye.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 8, 2016

Thanks to the generous contributions made by several Wildlife Center supporters, the eight-week course of antifungal medication was purchased for Bald Eagle #14-1040. When more than $900 was donated for the eagle, the veterinary staff ordered the large dose of medication for the next two months and gave the eagle its first dose from the small stash kept in the Wildlife Center’s hospital.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

Earlier this month, additional samples of Bald Eagle #14-1040’s abnormal feathers were sent to an outside laboratory in hopes that further testing could help the Center’s veterinary team decide how to treat the eagle. Results indicated the presence of a fungal infection in the feather shaft and surrounding feather follicle.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: December 7, 2015

Throughout 2015, many of Bald Eagle #14-1040’s feathers have remained abnormal. Multiple feathers on the eagle’s wings and tail have a deformed appearance; the veterinary team gave the bird additional time to see if new, healthy feathers would grow in during the bird’s annual molt. Some abnormal feathers simply remained, rather than falling out during the usual molt cycle; other feathers did fall out but were replaced with more deformed feathers. 

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalities in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Beaver #15-1914

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: December 17, 2015

During the past two months, Beaver #15-1914 has continued to do well outside in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. He is eating well, his wounds have healed, and the hair around the injury sites has grown back.

On December 17, the veterinary team weighed the beaver and noted that he is now 14 kg [31 LBS]. Two year-old beavers, like Beaver #15-1914, are typically between 11 to 13 kg at this time of year. The rehabilitation and veterinary teams will closely monitor the beaver’s weight during the following months and make adjustments to his meal as needed.

 

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: October 19, 2015

Beaver #15-1914 is doing well outside in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. On Friday, October 16, the veterinary staff removed the sutures on the beaver’s back. Dr. Dana was pleased with how everything had finally healed. After an additional two days of keeping the injury site dry, the rehabilitation staff were able to fill up a large tub in the beaver’s enclosure on Sunday, October 18. This GoPro footage captures the beaver’s first visits to his new pool.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: October 12, 2015

During the past week, Beaver #15-1914’s wounds have continued to heal well. On Saturday, October 10, Dr. Dana declared that the beaver’s wounds no longer needed treatment, and the beaver was ready to move outside.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: October 6, 2015

Beaver #15-1914 is doing well and his wounds are healing. The young beaver has gained nearly a kilogram since he was admitted in late August – the beaver recently weighed in at 9.8 kilograms, compared to 8.94 kilograms at admission.

On October 1, Dr. Helen performed surgical debridement of the beaver’s wounds on his abdomen, removing dead tissue to improve healing in the wounds. Bandages were applied to the wounds to protect the wounds from infection.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: September 28, 2015

Beaver #15-1914 continues to heal well; he has remained bright, alert, and very feisty. On September 21, the veterinary staff noted the large wound on the beaver’s right side was fully closed and the other large lacerations on the beaver’s abdomen were nearly healed. Since the wounds are nearly healed, the beaver will now only need to be anesthetized every three days for treatment.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: September 18, 2015

Beaver #15-1914’s wounds have been healing well during the past week. The beaver has been anesthetized every other day for treatment, which includes flushing of the wounds, treatment with medical honey, and re-bandaging. On September 17, Hospital Cam viewers were able to watch this procedure and were treated to some close-ups of the veterinary care. Drs. Helen and Dana were pleased with the healing progress.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: September 11, 2015

Beaver #15-1914 has been eating well and gaining weight. The culture of the beaver’s wounds returned, and it appears that the bacteria are resistant to the antibiotics the vet staff had been using. A special type of antibiotic had to be ordered; the new course of antibiotics was started on September 10 and will last ten days.

Vet staff will continue to clean the beaver’s wounds daily.

On August 28, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries captured a juvenile male beaver who was reportedly injured near the North River Dam in Rockingham County. The beaver was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #15-1914.

Upon presentation, the beaver was exceptionally calm and showed possible signs of impaired vision. The beaver was in good body condition – weighing approximately 9 kg – but had lacerations on his back, abdomen, and tail, indicating that the animal suffered physical trauma.

Latest Update: September 4, 2015

During a visual exam of Beaver #15-1914 on September 1, the veterinary staff noticed that there was purulent material (pus) coming from the beaver’s wounds. The staff sedated the beaver and thoroughly cleaned his wounds.

The initial plan was to monitor the wounds and clean every few days as needed; due the change in the status of the wounds, the vet staff is now cleaning the beaver’s wounds daily, flushing out the purulent material with a solution of saline and betadine.

Eastern Ratsnake #15-2068

On September 20, an Eastern Ratsnake was rescued by homeowners Eva and Andrew King (local falconers who have worked with the Wildlife Center) in Keswick, Virginia. The snake visits the Kings’ hen house regularly and eats approximately four eggs during each visit. The Kings often happily offer a few eggs to the snake, as his continued presence helps maintain a healthy ecosystem in their backyard.

Latest Update: September 28, 2015

Eastern Ratsnake #15-2068 remains bright and alert, and the surgical site is healing well.

Black Bear #15-0224

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: August 6, 2015

During the last week of July, Black Bear cub #15-0224 continued to heal in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. 

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-0224 has spent the past eight days (since July 23) in the chute of the Large Mammal Isolation facility to limit his mobility and allow staff to observe his movement. The cub was initially vocal following the separation from his “brothers” but he appears to be settling in. Staff elected not to pair him with a “buddy” in the adjoining enclosure because that would require darting one of the healthy cubs; housing the cub alone will also eliminate the possibility of further injuring the leg in playful wrestling matches.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: July 23, 2015

On July 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that Black Bear cub #15-0224 (no tag) was limping. The cub was favoring his hind right limb and seemed to have limited mobility.

On the afternoon of July 23, the veterinary team sedated the cub and brought him to the hospital for a physical exam and radiographs.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: April 17, 2015

Both bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The new “brothers” were introduced to one another on Tuesday, April 14; the cubs are getting along well. Cub #15-0224 currently weighs 3.08 kg; cub #15-0292 [red ear tag] weighs 3.62 kg.

On Thursday, April 16, the cubs were moved to the Center’s Bear Pens. The cubs are primarily housed in a zinger crate, which is on top of a large heating element to keep the cubs warm at night.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: April 9, 2015

Dr. Kelli reports that Black Bear cub #15-0224 is doing well; the bear is taking his bottle well and currently weighs 2.5 kg. DGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki reports that biologists checked a number of den sites, none was active with bear present. At this time of year, most bear families are now out foraging for spring foods. It’s the time of year to be “bear aware”! 

Black Bear cub #15-1651

On July 21, a homeowner in Goshen, Virginia saw three Black Bear cubs near the side of a road. The homeowner continued to see the cubs throughout the week, and on Saturday, July 25 saw one cub staggering by itself. The cub appeared to be very weak. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was notified, and an officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center later that same day.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

On the morning of July 31, Drs. Helen and Dana decided to move Black Bear cub #15-1651 to the Black Bear Complex with the other bear cubs. Cub #15-1651 has recovered well from her initial dehydration and emaciation; while she still needs to gain more weight, she has improved greatly during her first week of care.

On July 21, a homeowner in Goshen, Virginia saw three Black Bear cubs near the side of a road. The homeowner continued to see the cubs throughout the week, and on Saturday, July 25 saw one cub staggering by itself. The cub appeared to be very weak. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was notified, and an officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center later that same day.

Latest Update: July 30, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-1651 has made a dramatic improvement during the past few days. Each day, the bear has been more feisty and harder for the staff to handle; the cub is eating well and now weighs 9.16 kg.

Black Bear cub #15-0292

The Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted another Black Bear cub on the morning of April 13. The male cub was found in Albemarle County on April 8; the cub spent time in a tree for two days with no sign of the sow before a homeowner intervened and caught the bear.

Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the bear shortly after his admission. The cub weighed in a 3.35 kg and was bright, alert, and vocalizing. No injuries were found; the bear was mildly dehydrated.

Latest Update: April 17, 2015

Both bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The new “brothers” were introduced to one another on Tuesday, April 14; the cubs are getting along well. Cub #15-0224 currently weighs 3.08 kg; cub #15-0292 [red ear tag] weighs 3.62 kg.

On Thursday, April 16, the cubs were moved to the Center’s Bear Pens. The cubs are primarily housed in a zinger crate, which is on top of a large heating element to keep the cubs warm at night.

Black Bear cubs #15-0503 and #15-0504

On the evening of May 4, two more Black Bear cubs were admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cubs were found in Alleghany County; homeowners heard the cubs crying for several days. The homeowners set up a trail cam, but no sow was seen. The cubs were kept by people for several days before they were transported to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear #15-0458

On April 27, a small bear cub was seen in a tree in Page County, Virginia. There were reports of an injured adult bear within a mile of the cub, but upon further investigation, no adult bear was seen. Citizens left the cub in the tree overnight, and on the morning of April 28, the cub reportedly fell out of the tree. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was called, and transport was arranged to get the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear cub #15-0354

The Wildlife Center admitted another male Black Bear cub on Sunday, April 19 – bringing the current cub count to three! This cub was found on the side of the road by a citizen in Bath County, Virginia. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries contacted the Wildlife Center and requested transport.

Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when he arrived. The cub had no injuries, and was very vocal. Blood work was within normal limits. The cub weighed 2.48 kg; he was marked with a yellow ear tag.