Current Patients

Black Bear #16-1713

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: July 29, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1713 remains in grave condition today. This morning, Dr. Peach treated the bear and performed additional diagnostics, including repeat blood work, radiographs, and another ultrasound. While the bear's blood pressure is better than yesterday, several of the cub's blood values have decreased. Typically this would indicate that the bear is losing blood, though Dr. Peach is not able to find a significant source of the blood loss in the bear's chest or abdomen.

The bear will receive sedatives, pain medication, and supplemental oxygen throughout the weekend.

Black Bear cub #16-1654

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 29, 2016

What a difference a week makes! One week following her admission, Black Bear cub #16-1654 is enough of a handful that she's making daily treatments quite difficult for the veterinary staff. The bear's breathing has greatly improved, and she no longer requires sedation. Today, the team decided to move her to the outdoor Bear Pen enclosure where she'll have more room. At this point, the staff will offer her pain medication and antibiotics in her (very soft) food twice a day.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 27, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1654 continues to slowly improve. Dr. Ernesto reported that the cub was more feisty today, and getting difficult to handle. The bear cub ate her very soft meal last night -- a mix of canned dog food, very small pieces of softened strawberries, and baby food. Since the cub is getting difficult to handle, as long as she continues to self-feed, tomorrow will be her last day of injectable medications. The bear will be switched to oral medications (delivered in her food) on Friday.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 26, 2016

Dr. Ernesto was pleased to report that Black Bear cub #16-1654 was brighter and even a little feisty on the morning of July 26. The cub managed to get her e-collar off, and did eat her soft meal yesterday evening. While at rest, the cub is breathing a little more easily, and Dr. Ernesto discontinued the supplemental oxygen. When the bear is restrained for treatments, the bear still wheezes and has difficulty breathing, but the staff is encouraged by her progress.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1654 pulled through the weekend. On Saturday morning, the bear was very quiet and easily restrained; the bear had harsh breathing sounds due to fluid in her chest cavity. Dr. Peach took chest radiographs and performed a thoracentesis -- a puncture and drainage of the thoracic cavity. Dr. Peach removed about five milliliters of air from both sides of the bear's chest, though no significant amount of blood or fluid was removed.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 22, 2016

Dr. Dave and licensed veterinary technician Leigh-Ann took the bear cub to surgery within an hour of her admission. Dr. Dave was able to successfully stabilize the cub's jaw fracture with an external fixator; four metal pins were inserted perpendicular into the bear's jaw, then a metal bar was attached to the pins parallel to the bottom jaw.

Black Bear cubs of 2016

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

On July 24, Critter Cam viewers noted that "No Tag" had a wound on his left front paw. Tori and Elise, the rehabilitation interns, carefully set a large live trap in the bear yard, hoping to catch No Tag. Instead, they ended up catching Pink Tag, the two-year-old female who is living with the cubs! With Pink Tag safely contained, Dr. Ernesto was able to enter the bear yard to dart No Tag.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 13, 2016

The seven bear cubs settled into transition area #2 of the Black Bear Complex on Monday evening; the rehabilitation staff checked on the cubs before leaving for the evening. The staff planned on leaving the cubs in the transition area for one to two weeks to "meet and greet" their neighbor, Black Bear #16-0364 [Pink Tag] -- but little Orange Tag quickly changed the plan for everyone!

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 12, 2016

On July 11, the rehabilitation staff moved all seven bear cubs to the Black Bear Complex! The team used large humane traps, baited with tasty fried chicken, to trap each bear in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; each trapped bear was then loaded onto the Polaris for a quick drive to transition area #2 in the Bear Complex.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: June 7, 2016

The three Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure. According to Dr. Kelli, they love climbing on the logs in their enclosure and swinging on the fire hose hammock. Rehabilitation interns Elise and Tori set up a new tire swing this weekend for the cubs, but so far the cubs haven’t yet used it.

Current cub weights (as of June 6): 
White Tag: 4.9kg
Red Tag: 7.5 kg
No Tag: 5.6kg

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: May 19, 2016

On the afternoon of May 17, the three bear cubs were moved to the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. No Tag was the first to come out of the zinger crate, followed by Red Tag, then White Tag. White Tag watched her brothers from the safety of a bear den, while Red Tag and No Tag began climbing the walls and logs in the enclosure.

The bears are doing well so far, and the Center staff are working on diagnosing issues with the Critter Cam in this enclosure.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

The trio of Black Bear cubs is doing well at the Wildlife Center. Until this week, the cubs have been housed in zinger crates in the Center’s Metal Cage Complex; this outdoor structure offers protection from the elements and has been a quiet place for the cubs to get used to bottle-feeding and meet one another. Now that the cubs are introduced and are getting more playful with one another, it’s time to move to a bigger enclosure!

Black Bear cub #16-0598

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

On July 24, Critter Cam viewers noted that "No Tag" had a wound on his left front paw. Tori and Elise, the rehabilitation interns, carefully set a large live trap in the bear yard, hoping to catch No Tag. Instead, they ended up catching Pink Tag, the two-year-old female who is living with the cubs! With Pink Tag safely contained, Dr. Ernesto was able to enter the bear yard to dart No Tag.

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: May 11, 2016

When Black Bear cub #16-0598 arrived at Virginia Tech’s Black Bear Research Center, the cub was placed in a crate facing the surrogate sow and her two cubs. One of the two cubs is known to the Wildlife Center as #16-0305, which was fostered onto the sow in April. 

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: May 11, 2016

On May 10, Dr. Dave anesthetized Black Bear cub #16-0598 for a complete physical exam, radiographs, and blood work. Results were within normal limits and the cub was deemed healthy.

Eastern River Cooter #16-1362

On June 27, a woman driving in Ashland, Virginia saw the car in front of her swerve -- to hit a turtle.

Latest Update: July 19, 2016

During the past two weeks, Eastern River Cooter #16-1362 has continued to heal. The turtle's small carapace fracture is stable and healing well; the plastron abrasions began to heal well at first with daily cleaning and antibiotics, but then became static and have not improved during the past week. This is likely due to the turtle's large size and heavy weight; it's difficult to provide the turtle with a large enough tub in captivity to keep her weight off of her plastron.

Virginia Opossum #16-0101

On Friday March 11, the Wildlife Center got a call about an injured Virginia Opossum that was seen on the road less than a quarter mile from the Center. Outreach coordinator Chapin volunteered to scope out the situation and rescue the opossum if necessary.

Chapin found the opossum on the side of the road near the driveway of the Center’s neighbor. The opossum was quiet but alert with blood on her head. Chapin put on thick gloves and used a towel to cover the opossum before placing the injured animal in a crate.

Latest Update: July 19, 2016

Delphine has been doing well with her training to be an education ambassador. Outreach staff Amanda and Raina have been working with her regularly, and often bring Delphine to daily rounds with the veterinary staff, or carry her around for visits with the staff and volunteers at the Center.

On Friday March 11, the Wildlife Center got a call about an injured Virginia Opossum that was seen on the road less than a quarter mile from the Center. Outreach coordinator Chapin volunteered to scope out the situation and rescue the opossum if necessary.

Chapin found the opossum on the side of the road near the driveway of the Center’s neighbor. The opossum was quiet but alert with blood on her head. Chapin put on thick gloves and used a towel to cover the opossum before placing the injured animal in a crate.

Latest Update: June 29, 2016

On May 28, Virginia Opossum #16-0101's nine baby opossums were moved to the Center's Mammal Complex to prepare for release. During the next two weeks, the opossums continued to grow, and by June 11 and 12, all nine babies were ready for release. All were returned to the wild in Augusta County in two separate groups.

On Friday March 11, the Wildlife Center got a call about an injured Virginia Opossum that was seen on the road less than a quarter mile from the Center. Outreach coordinator Chapin volunteered to scope out the situation and rescue the opossum if necessary.

Chapin found the opossum on the side of the road near the driveway of the Center’s neighbor. The opossum was quiet but alert with blood on her head. Chapin put on thick gloves and used a towel to cover the opossum before placing the injured animal in a crate.

Latest Update: May 25, 2016

Virginia Opossum #16-0101 and her nine babies are doing well. The young opossums are growing quickly; they range in weight from 240-260 grams this week.

According to Dr. Kelli, young opossums typically wean from their mothers when they are about 96 – 108 days old; we estimate these opossums are likely 92 days old. The rehabilitation staff will continue to weigh and monitor the young opossums, and they will be separated from their mother sometime in the next couple of weeks and prepared for release.

On Friday March 11, the Wildlife Center got a call about an injured Virginia Opossum that was seen on the road less than a quarter mile from the Center. Outreach coordinator Chapin volunteered to scope out the situation and rescue the opossum if necessary.

Chapin found the opossum on the side of the road near the driveway of the Center’s neighbor. The opossum was quiet but alert with blood on her head. Chapin put on thick gloves and used a towel to cover the opossum before placing the injured animal in a crate.

Latest Update: May 5, 2016

Opossum #16-0101 and her joeys are doing well. The babies are old enough to have moved out of their mother’s pouch and are fully furred. The veterinary and rehabilitation staff both counted the baby opossums and identified nine joeys. The babies were assigned patient numbers #16-0549 - #16-0557.

On Friday March 11, the Wildlife Center got a call about an injured Virginia Opossum that was seen on the road less than a quarter mile from the Center. Outreach coordinator Chapin volunteered to scope out the situation and rescue the opossum if necessary.

Chapin found the opossum on the side of the road near the driveway of the Center’s neighbor. The opossum was quiet but alert with blood on her head. Chapin put on thick gloves and used a towel to cover the opossum before placing the injured animal in a crate.

Latest Update: April 12, 2016

Virginia Opossum #16-0101 and her baby opossums have been doing well during the past month at the Center. The babies have been spotted outside of the pouch occasionally; they are getting bigger and growing fur.

White-tailed Deer Fawns 2016

Each year during the spring and summer months, the Wildlife Center admits dozens of White-tailed Deer fawns. As of June 7, the Center is caring for seven fawns.

Latest Update: July 18, 2016

The fawn population at the Wildlife Center has grown quickly during the past month; as of July 18, the Center is caring for 32 fawns. Many of these fawns are truly orphaned, though nine fawns were admitted due to "inappropriate human possession" -- what the staff also refer to as "fawn-napping".

Red Fox #16-1195

On June 15, a Red Fox was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was hit by a car in Highland County, Virginia. Dr. Helen examined the female fox upon arrival and found the fox to be quiet, dull, and lame in the left rear leg. An ultrasound of the fox's abdomen showed no signs of internal bleeding, but radiographs revealed a fracture on the femoral head of the fox's left rear leg.

Latest Update: July 18, 2016

During the past three weeks, Red Fox #16-1195 has been healing very well; the veterinarians were pleased to see the fox gaining more mobility on her injured hind leg each day. As of July 11, the fox was walking normally and the incision site from the fox's surgery had completely healed. The fox will need additional space to move and climb to build muscle mass and fully recover from surgery, so the fox will be transferred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator who specializes in foxes. 

On June 15, a Red Fox was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was hit by a car in Highland County, Virginia. Dr. Helen examined the female fox upon arrival and found the fox to be quiet, dull, and lame in the left rear leg. An ultrasound of the fox's abdomen showed no signs of internal bleeding, but radiographs revealed a fracture on the femoral head of the fox's left rear leg.

Latest Update: June 27, 2016

Red Fox #16-1195 continues to do well in the days following her leg surgery. The fox is eating well and on June 26, was toe-touching on her left hind leg.

On June 27, Dr. Helen moved the fox to one of the Center's Bear Pen enclosures. This cement block enclosure will give the fox enough space to walk around as she continues to recover, but should limit the fox's activity and will prevent the fox from climbing.

On June 15, a Red Fox was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was hit by a car in Highland County, Virginia. Dr. Helen examined the female fox upon arrival and found the fox to be quiet, dull, and lame in the left rear leg. An ultrasound of the fox's abdomen showed no signs of internal bleeding, but radiographs revealed a fracture on the femoral head of the fox's left rear leg.

Latest Update: June 24, 2016

Dr. Helen reports that the fox's surgery at the Animal Hospital of Waynesboro went really well! There were no complications with the FHO procedure, and the fox recovered well from anesthesia. The fox will remain in the Center's holding room in a zinger crate for the next few days and is also wearing a "cone of shame" to keep the surgical site protected.

Many thanks to all of the staff at the Animal Hospital of Waynesboro, especially Dr. Reeder and technicians Lauren and Kat!

Barn Owl #16-0720 -- #16-0723

In mid-May, a nest of Barn Owls was found in a silo in Rockingham County, Virginia. The nest was destroyed when the cattle feed in the silo was removed, and the four Barn Owl chicks in the nest came to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: July 12, 2016

The four young Barn Owls are growing up quickly; their flight feathers are grown in, and at the end of June, the rehabilitation staff decided it was time to move the birds to a larger space. On June 30, the four owls were moved to a larger flight enclosure [FP6].

Bald Eagle #16-1012

On June 4, a young Bald Eagle was found down on the ground near an active eagle nest in Midlothian, Virginia. The bird was unable to fly, and was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who found a fracture in the eagle’s left wing. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 12, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1012 healed well in the weeks following her surgery. Two-week post-op radiographs were taken on June 23 and showed evidence of healing; on June 29, the veterinary team removed the stabilizing external fixator from the eagle's wing. The healing fracture remained bandaged, and the team began physical therapy on the bird's wing to encourage extension and mobility.

On June 4, a young Bald Eagle was found down on the ground near an active eagle nest in Midlothian, Virginia. The bird was unable to fly, and was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who found a fracture in the eagle’s left wing. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: June 20, 2016

On June 9, Dr. Dana took Bald Eaglet #16-1012 to surgery to repair the bird's left major metacarpal fracture. Dr. Dana was able to achieve good alignment of the fractured bone and placed an external fixator to stabilize the fracture. Four pins, stabilized by a sturdy external bar, will hold the fractured bone in place during the next few weeks. The bird's wing was bandaged, and the eaglet recovered from anesthesia well in the Center's holding room.

Bald Eaglet #15-0733

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 27, 2016

During the past three months, the rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0733. The bird's flight capabilities have not changed much during this time period; the bird is not able to fly all that well, and often flies low to the ground. While the eagle's initial injury may be causing permanent flight deficits, there is also a chance that the limited flight is due to the number of broken feathers the eagle has. At this time of year, many eagles are molting; Bald Eagle #15-0733 has several new feathers growing in.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: March 16, 2016

During the past two months, the rehabilitation staff exercised Bald Eagle #15-0733. Despite daily exercise sessions, the eagle continued to have poor endurance and was often unable to make no more than five to seven passes from end to end. Interim wildlife rehabilitator Kendra noted that Bald Eagle #15-0733 was frequently flappy while flying, unable to maintain height, and often grounded after only a few passes.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

After several weeks of rest following imping, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was started on daily exercise in flight pen A3 (along with Bald Eagle #15-1339) on January 28.

Rehabilitation intern Kendra reported that the eagle had poor stamina and maneuvering the first two days of exercise, but this is not unexpected as the eagle becomes re-accustomed to the larger enclosure. The staff will continue to exercise the eagle daily.
 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 4, 2016

On December 24, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was brought into to the Wildlife Center’s hospital for his imping procedure. Seven feathers [five primaries and two secondary feathers] were replaced on the left wing and four feathers [two primaries and two secondary] were replaced on the right wing. The team also replaced eight tail feathers. During the procedure, the team also noted that the eagle had a several flight feathers in “blood”, indicating that these feathers were growing in on their own.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in the FP4 flight pen during the last month. On December 17, one of the Center’s A-pens [A2] became available, and the young eagle was moved to the larger enclosure. Since Bald Eagle #15-0733 is now in a larger flight pen and the likelihood of causing feather damage is minimized, the veterinary staff scheduled the eagle’s imping [feather replacement] procedure for December 24.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

During the past two months, Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in a small enclosure.  On November 10, the young bird was moved to a slightly larger enclosure – FP4.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: September 10, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 still has not been seen flying much. Repeat radiographs performed on September 7 were largely unremarkable and shows that the fracture site continues to heal. The staff noticed that the bird had many broken tail and wing feathers and decided to move Bald Eaglet #15-0733 to the A3 tower to prevent further damage to the feathers.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well.  Both are eating and gaining weight. 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 24, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s daily physical therapy sessions have gone well during the past week. During each physical therapy session, one of the veterinarians extends the eagle’s wing to stretch the muscles and ligaments in the wing.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

Follow-up radiographs of Bald Eagle #15-0733’s healing wing were taken on June 4; they revealed that a callus was continuing to form over the fracture sites. Dr. Meghan noted, however, that the bird’s wing was severely contacted. The bird’s bandage was removed to allow the young eagle to extend its wing; daily physical therapy sessions were scheduled.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 was anesthetized for radiographs on May 29. Dr. Meghan found that calluses were forming on both wing fractures, though there were signs of osteomyelitis

Great Horned Owlet #16-0923

On May 7, a Great Horned Owlet was found on the ground in Chesapeake, Virginia. The bird was brought to local rehabilitator Gay Frazee and kept in her care until May 31, when the owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center to live with our surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 24, 2016

On June 20, the four young Great Horned Owlets were moved to flight pen A2, where they have more space to explore and fly. Papa G'Ho stayed behind for a few days; Papa has had a recurring eye ulcer on his left eye for the past few weeks, and Dr. Dana wanted to stain the eye one last time on Thursday, June 23 before moving Papa.

On May 7, a Great Horned Owlet was found on the ground in Chesapeake, Virginia. The bird was brought to local rehabilitator Gay Frazee and kept in her care until May 31, when the owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center to live with our surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 20, 2016

The four Great Horned Owlets that are living with surrogate Papa G'Ho are doing well. The young owlets are looking more like adult Great Horned Owls each week and are very active in their enclosure. Students report that the newest addition to the owl parliament - owlet #16-0923 - is especially feisty.

Each Sunday, the rehabilitation staff has been offering live mice in a tub to the owl family as "practice mouse school" for the young birds. The owlets are able to observe Papa hunting for mice or try to hunt on their own.

Great Horned Owlet #16-0456

On April 29, the Wildlife Center admitted patient #16-0456 – an orphaned Great Horned Owlet rescued from Roanoke, VA. The owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center to be reared by the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl, Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 24, 2016

On June 20, the four young Great Horned Owlets were moved to flight pen A2, where they have more space to explore and fly. Papa G'Ho stayed behind for a few days; Papa has had a recurring eye ulcer on his left eye for the past few weeks, and Dr. Dana wanted to stain the eye one last time on Thursday, June 23 before moving Papa.

On April 29, the Wildlife Center admitted patient #16-0456 – an orphaned Great Horned Owlet rescued from Roanoke, VA. The owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center to be reared by the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl, Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 20, 2016

The four Great Horned Owlets that are living with surrogate Papa G'Ho are doing well. The young owlets are looking more like adult Great Horned Owls each week and are very active in their enclosure. Students report that the newest addition to the owl parliament - owlet #16-0923 - is especially feisty.

Each Sunday, the rehabilitation staff has been offering live mice in a tub to the owl family as "practice mouse school" for the young birds. The owlets are able to observe Papa hunting for mice or try to hunt on their own.

On April 29, the Wildlife Center admitted patient #16-0456 – an orphaned Great Horned Owlet rescued from Roanoke, VA. The owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center to be reared by the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl, Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 6, 2016

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well at the Wildlife Center. Many Critter Cam viewers have been able to watch the Center’s non-releasable surrogate, Papa G’Ho, and the three young Great Horned Owlets during the past week. The owlets are eating well, growing, and have been very playful – the rehabilitation staff have been adding various enrichment items regularly.

Great Horned Owlet #16-0307

On April 18, a nestling Great Horned Owlet was brought to the Wildlife Center of Virginia with a possible wing injury and was admitted as patient #16-0307.

Latest Update: June 24, 2016

On June 20, the four young Great Horned Owlets were moved to flight pen A2, where they have more space to explore and fly. Papa G'Ho stayed behind for a few days; Papa has had a recurring eye ulcer on his left eye for the past few weeks, and Dr. Dana wanted to stain the eye one last time on Thursday, June 23 before moving Papa.

On April 18, a nestling Great Horned Owlet was brought to the Wildlife Center of Virginia with a possible wing injury and was admitted as patient #16-0307.

Latest Update: June 20, 2016

The four Great Horned Owlets that are living with surrogate Papa G'Ho are doing well. The young owlets are looking more like adult Great Horned Owls each week and are very active in their enclosure. Students report that the newest addition to the owl parliament - owlet #16-0923 - is especially feisty.

Each Sunday, the rehabilitation staff has been offering live mice in a tub to the owl family as "practice mouse school" for the young birds. The owlets are able to observe Papa hunting for mice or try to hunt on their own.

On April 18, a nestling Great Horned Owlet was brought to the Wildlife Center of Virginia with a possible wing injury and was admitted as patient #16-0307.

Latest Update: May 6, 2016

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well at the Wildlife Center. Many Critter Cam viewers have been able to watch the Center’s non-releasable surrogate, Papa G’Ho, and the three young Great Horned Owlets during the past week. The owlets are eating well, growing, and have been very playful – the rehabilitation staff have been adding various enrichment items regularly.

Great Horned Owlet #16-0097

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: June 24, 2016

On June 20, the four young Great Horned Owlets were moved to flight pen A2, where they have more space to explore and fly. Papa G'Ho stayed behind for a few days; Papa has had a recurring eye ulcer on his left eye for the past few weeks, and Dr. Dana wanted to stain the eye one last time on Thursday, June 23 before moving Papa.

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: June 20, 2016

The four Great Horned Owlets that are living with surrogate Papa G'Ho are doing well. The young owlets are looking more like adult Great Horned Owls each week and are very active in their enclosure. Students report that the newest addition to the owl parliament - owlet #16-0923 - is especially feisty.

Each Sunday, the rehabilitation staff has been offering live mice in a tub to the owl family as "practice mouse school" for the young birds. The owlets are able to observe Papa hunting for mice or try to hunt on their own.

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: May 6, 2016

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well at the Wildlife Center. Many Critter Cam viewers have been able to watch the Center’s non-releasable surrogate, Papa G’Ho, and the three young Great Horned Owlets during the past week. The owlets are eating well, growing, and have been very playful – the rehabilitation staff have been adding various enrichment items regularly.

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: April 13, 2016

Great Horned Owlet #16-0097 has been doing well in the small outdoor enclosure with Papa G’Ho. Since the owlet is exploring more and testing out its wings, the staff decided to move the young owl and Papa to a larger enclosure [FP6]. You can now watch for them on Critter Cam at night! 

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: April 4, 2016

Great Horned Owlet #16-0097 continues to improve and is walking and moving its limbs normally. On March 27, Dr. Dana took follow-up radiographs of Great Horned Owlet #16-0097’s leg. Radiographs revealed that the young owlet’s fracture was a mineralized callus at the fracture site with mild displacement. Dr. Dana believes that the healed limb will not cause the bird any long-term problems since the owlet is using both of its limbs normally.

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: March 23, 2016

Great Horned Owlet #16-0097 improved significantly during the past week and has been eating well. On March 17, Dr. Helen took follow-up radiographs, which confirmed that the fracture was stable and showed mineral bridging as well as callous formation at the site. Since the fracture was healing well, Dr. Helen removed the owlet’s splint. The vet staff closely monitored the owlet’s foot for swelling and, by March 21, the young owlet was using both legs and feet normally – grabbing towels and bearing his full weight.

On March 9, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a hatchling Great Horned Owl after its nest was destroyed after a logging company was clearing trees. Loggers found the young owlet, and transported it to the Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #16-0097.

Latest Update: March 15, 2016

Great Horned Owlet #16-0097 has gradually improved during the past five days. The young owl is now eating well and is beginning to eat from a chopped plate. Dr. Dana reports the bruises on the bird’s left wing and leg are improving and noted that the swelling in the bird’s left foot has decreased with daily massages and bandage changes.

Bald Eaglet #15-1339

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: June 14, 2016

During the past two months, there has been little change in the quality of Bald Eagle #15-1339’s flight. The bird still flies roughly 15 passes in an A-pen flight enclosure, but around the 10th pass, the bird begins swooping low to the ground, and has a hard time regaining altitude. The staff has been unable to find time to creance the Bald Eagle off-site in this busy spring season, since only very few staff members are trained on this procedure.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-1339 continues daily exercise in one of the Center’s A-pen flight enclosures. Since mid-February, there hasn’t been much improvement in the bird’s flight ability; while the eagle does fly at least 15 passes during each exercise session, the bird still struggles to maintain elevation during flight. The eagle is able to regain altitude and typically flies back up to a high perch in the enclosure, but the staff would like to see the eagle maintain elevation from perch-to-perch, as opposed to swooping down in the middle of the flight pen.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: February 19, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-1339’s flight has improved during the past two weeks; the bird is able to fly more passes in the A3 flight enclosure during each daily exercise session. 

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

On January 5, Bald Eagle #15-1339 had radiographs taken to recheck the swelling in the bird’s right wing. Dr. Helen saw no abnormalities; the eagle was cleared to move to a smaller enclosure [C-pen] before moving back to a large flight pen for exercise.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: December 29, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #15-1339’s quality of flight has declined. The young bird was exercising fairly well in mid-December, and averaging about 12-15 passes during each daily exercise session. Toward the end of each session, wildlife rehabilitator Leighann noted that the bird’s wings did not appear symmetrical and that one wing was working a little harder than the other. Within the past week, the bird flew fewer passes during each session and was struggling to gain height.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: December 17, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1339 continues to exercise daily and during the past few weeks, the bird’s stamina has improved. The bird’s flight continues to improve though still needs improvement before release is considered. At this point, the eagle flies an average of 10-15 passes in the flight enclosure and still needs to improve in height and lift. On December 16, the eagle was moved to flight pen A1, along with Bald Eagle #15-0355.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1339 is still flying inconsistently during daily exercise – getting tired quickly some days, flapping instead of gliding, or flying to the ground rather than a perch.

The eagle’s imped feathers remain intact, though some of the feathers on the left wing are tattered or broken. The bird occasionally has a left wing droop during and after exercise; Dr. Helen took radiographs on November 9 to identify any abnormalities, but the results were unremarkable.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: November 5, 2015

On October 29, the veterinary staff performed the imping procedure on Bald Eagle #15-1339. Feathers were replaced on both of the eagle’s wings as well as its tail, user donor feathers from two different Bald Eagles. Three days later, Bald Eagle #15-1339 resumed daily exercise.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: October 27, 2015

On October 6, a backpack GPS transmitter was placed on Bald Eagle #15-1339. Following placement of the backpack, the staff continued to exercise the eagle to ensure the bird was able to easily fly with the new device attached.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: October 2, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1261, #15-1319, and #15-1339 have all been flying well – at least on days when it hasn’t been raining heavily! The birds are starting to achieve their “optimum level” of flight – 15 or more passes during each exercise session.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1312 and 15-1339 have been doing well in flight pen A3 during the past week. As many Critter Cam viewers have noted, the eaglets are still young and spend some of the time laying down on the ground to rest and sleep.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 1, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-1312 has been eating well during the past few days and has gained weight; the bird now weighs 3.97 kg. The young eagle is very alert and feisty, and on July 1, was moved to flight pen A3.

Bald Eagle #16-0038

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: June 8, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has continued daily exercise during the past two months. The eagle has been making gradual improvement, though still is not flying well enough for release. The eagle typically flies an average of 12-14 laps in the Center’s large A-pen enclosure; 10 of those passes are usually good in quality, though sometimes the eagle misses landing on a perch and then struggles to gain height once grounded.

The staff will continue to exercise the eagle each day.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038’s feet continue to slowly heal. On March 28, a routine check revealed that the lesion on the eagle’s left foot was swollen. A topical disinfectant and sealing agent were applied to the wound. Center staff continues to monitor the healing progress during bi-weekly foot and feather checks.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 15, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 remained in a small outdoor enclosure throughout the first half of March. On March 14, the veterinary team re-radiographed the eagle’s healing wing, and found that the fracture was healed and very stable. Dr. Dana noted that the eagle’s left wing is mildly stiff, but the bird is able to achieve full wing extension. The wounds on the eagle’s face and feet continue to heal well.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 1, 2016

On February 21, radiographs were taken to check on Bald Eagle #16-0038’s healing fracture; radiographs showed that the fracture alignment was unchanged. Dr. Dana expected to see a little more healing progress, but it’s likely that the fracture has been slower to callus since it’s been challenging for the vet staff to keep the eagle’s wing completely immobile.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

In the 10 days following her admission, Bald Eagle #16-0038 recovered in the Center’s holding room. At first, the eagle mostly left her wing bandage and body wrap alone, but soon it became a daily challenge to get the eagle to leave her bandages on! The eagle regularly picked at her wing bandages, and on a few occasions managed to partly remove or loosen them; Dr. Dana also noted that the bird is so large and strong, that even the body wrap doesn’t completely prevent the bird from slightly moving her injured wing.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 5, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 is recovering quietly at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Dana reports that the eagle is perching, eating well, and mostly leaving her bandages alone, which can be an important component of the healing process! The eagle’s heart rate has been within normal limits during the past two days.

The veterinary team continues to clean the eagle’s foot and face wounds daily; all lacerations are currently static. Repeat radiographs are scheduled for February 13.

Black Bear #16-0364

April 23 was a busy day for admissions – particularly bear admissions! Shortly after Black Bear yearling #16-0354 was admitted, another Black Bear arrived at the Center.

Latest Update: June 3, 2016

On Thursday, June 2, Dr. Helen and veterinary technician Leigh-Ann darted and examined Black Bear #16-0364. Dr. Helen reports, “I was shocked at how much her coat has improved. She looks like a totally different bear! The areas that were completely bare now have short fur present!! Her coat has GREATLY improved with treatment.” Dr. Dana took a break from afternoon treatments and admissions to see the bear for herself; Dr. Dana was also quite pleased and said the difference in the bear’s appearance was like night and day.

April 23 was a busy day for admissions – particularly bear admissions! Shortly after Black Bear yearling #16-0354 was admitted, another Black Bear arrived at the Center.

Latest Update: May 13, 2016

On May 12, Drs. Dana and Helen darted and sedated Black Bear #16-0364 for a recheck examination and blood work. The bear was successfully darted and brought into the Center’s hospital.

April 23 was a busy day for admissions – particularly bear admissions! Shortly after Black Bear yearling #16-0354 was admitted, another Black Bear arrived at the Center.

Latest Update: May 3, 2016

On April 28, Drs. Dave and Dana successfully darted and sedated Black Bear #16-0364. The bear was brought into the Wildlife Center’s hospital for a full examination and radiographs, along with blood work and biopsies.

Black Bear cub #16-0487

On April 30, a female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center after she was found in Greene County, Virginia. A citizen found the cub in his pasture, and at first thought the small bear as a cat; when he realized it was a cub, he placed her in a cat carrier and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The DGIF officer who picked up the cub believes the bear was likely displaced by the nearby Rocky Mount fire in Shenandoah National Park.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-0487 (White Tag) has been doing well during the past two weeks at the Wildlife Center; the cub has been drinking some formula from a bottle, but prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a mush bowl. The cub currently weighs 3.14 kg.

On May 12, White Tag was introduced to her new brother, Black Bear cub #16-0598. The two cubs have been getting along well. Here’s a video of White Tag before she was introduced to the other cub.

Black Bear cub #16-0568

On May 5, a citizen found a bear cub on the side of the road in Pittsylvania County. The cub was alone and had a wound on its back. The bear was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who cleaned maggots from the wound and treated the bear with an anti-parasitic medication and medicinal honey. The following day, a Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-0568 (Red Tag) has been healing well during the past week. The cub’s wounds and sutures are checked and cleaned daily, and Dr. Dana is pleased with the healing progress. On Friday, May 13, Dr. Dana decided to remove the cub’s e-collar; on Sunday, May 15, the cub was cleared to be introduced to the two other bear cubs. The rehabilitation staff will be monitoring the cubs closely to ensure no sutures are accidentally removed in cub wrestling matches. If all goes according to plan, Red Tag will have his sutures removed on Sunday, May 22. 

Bald Eagle #15-0355

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

During the past six weeks, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been exercised daily in one of the Center’s flight enclosures. Despite many months of exercise and rehabilitation, the eagle has not made significant improvements in stamina or quality of flight. Given the eagle’s medical and rehabilitation history, the veterinary team decided to deem this eagle non-releasable. Center staff will begin the process of looking for placement for this Bald Eagle. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

During the last two weeks of January, the rehabilitation staff continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and administered daily anti-inflammatories to see if the pain-reliever would treat the bird’s left wing droop. The bird continued to make at least 15 passes end-to-end, but was very flappy and appeared to be exerting considerable effort to gain height while flying.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

During the week of January 11, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was cage-rested and monitored. The veterinary team was able to keep an eye on the eagle through one of the Wildlife Center’s webcams; the staff continued to note the eagle’s left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 13, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-0355 was exercising well last week, although the bird was not able to attain the optimum level of exercise to be considered for release. Mid-week, the bird’s flight became a little more labored; the veterinary staff adjusted the size of the protective carpal bumpers on the eagle's "wrists" to see if smaller bumpers would make the bird more comfortable. Toward the end of the week, the eagle displayed an intermittent left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 6, 2016

During the past 10 days, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has continued to fly well during daily exercise. The staff and students report that she is regularly making 10-12 passes in flight pen A1 before becoming tired, showing an increase in stamina. The eagle will continue with daily exercise and needs to reach the optimum level of 15 passes end-to-end consistently for at least a week before consideration for release.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 28, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been flying well during the past few weeks in flight pen A1. Wildlife rehabilitator Leighann began pushing the eagle to the “optimum exercise level” on December 27 and said that the eagle is doing well, but needs a little bit more work on stamina. As long as exercise goes well during the next couple of weeks, the staff hope that the eagle will be able to be released in 2016. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 9, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has made slow and steady improvement in the past three weeks. The bird is now consistently flying 10 passes end-to-end and has been able to gain and maintain good height during exercise sessions. The eagle’s stamina has also increased, but Bald Eagle #15-0355 has yet to reach optimal level [15 passes end-to-end] and will continue with daily exercise sessions to improve her conditioning in the upcoming weeks.  

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 during the past two weeks. The eagle is still not flying well consistently but has shown some improvement. The eagle often becomes tired or stubborn during exercise sessions and gains only moderate height in flight, but is making more passes and better height than earlier this month.

A feet and feather exam on November 16 showed several broken feather tips, but the eagle is in good body condition overall.

Daily exercise will continue, giving the eagle more time to gain strength and stamina.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 6, 2015

On October 22, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to flight pen A2. After several days of adjusting to the larger space, the rehabilitation staff started daily exercise sessions with the eagle. At this point, the eagle is not flying well, though several weeks of conditioning will be needed to determine if there are permanent flight deficits due to the eagle’s injuries. The staff report that the eagle is able to fly a total of about six to seven passes right now, mostly at low altitudes. Exercise will continue during the month of November.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 11, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been lightly exercised by the rehabilitation staff. Though the bird has made some improvement in her ability to fly, she is still not flying very well.

On September 11, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #15-0355 to the tower in A3 for further rest and recovery, where the eagle now shares an enclosure with eaglet #15-0733.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 7, 2015

The veterinary staff have been doing a fair amount of “eagle shuffling” this summer – with 9-10 Bald Eagle patients in care all summer long, there has been a lot of bird-moving to ensure that the eagles that are closest to release can be safely exercised and prepared for life back in the wild.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been doing well during the past month and has a good appetite – the bird seems to prefer rat versus fish for daily meals.

On July 27, the veterinary staff noticed a small lesion on the eagle’s right wing and applied ointment and a bandage. The staff also noted that the eagle was molting several of her primary and tail feathers – typical for eagles in late summer.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been living with eaglets #15-1250 and #15-1348 during the past couple of weeks. While the adult eagle has not been regularly exercised since the addition of the young eagles, the staff note that the bird still struggles to get lift during flight, and often has trouble flying to high perches. With the eaglets growing and needing more room for exercise of their own, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to a smaller outdoor enclosure.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 22, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 daily. At first it seemed that the eagle was making slight improvements during sessions; however, the bird still has difficulty maintaining flight and is only able to make two to four passes. The eagle also frequently hops along the ground instead of flying during exercise sessions. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and monitor its flying abilities. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has been exercising Bald Eagle #15-0355 in flight pen A1 for the past ten days. During daily exercise sessions, the eagle has poor stamina and cannot gain height during flight; rather than fly end-to-end in the enclosure, the eagle often hops along the ground and cannot fly up to the perches. The eagle has been observed on the Critter Cam as spending most of her time on the lower A-frame perch.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 (wearing high-heel duct tape bumpers) has been monitored in the large outdoor enclosure during the past two weeks. The eagle has been maneuvering around the enclosure but has difficulty flying to the higher perches.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 21, 2015

After moving Bald Eagle #15-0355 to an outdoor pen on May 8, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff monitored the eagle for a left wing droop. The eagle was maneuvering well around the small outdoor enclosure [C1] and showed no signs of a wing droop, although the bird’s appetite was not strong.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 11, 2015

During the past three weeks, veterinary staff continued to conservatively treat Bald Eagle #15-0355’s broken wing and leg. The veterinary staff performed physical therapy sessions and bandage changes every three days. On April 28, Dr. Meghan carefully re-examined the bird’s wing and leg and noted that swelling was decreasing at both fracture sites.

Eastern Screech-owl #16-0063

On February 17, the Wildlife Center admitted a rare patient – a brown phase Eastern Screech-owl. There are three color morphs of Eastern Screech-owls; red, gray, and brown. In most of this small owl’s range, red and gray phases are equally common, and brown is only seen in 2-3% of Eastern Screech-owls. The rarity of this color morph made this patient especially interesting to the Center’s staff, students, and volunteers.

Latest Update: March 17, 2016

On March 16, Dr. Helen attempted to perform an eye exam on Eastern Screech-owl #16-0063. During handling, the owl became too stressed for Dr. Helen to feel comfortable moving forward with the exam, and the eye exam was postponed until March 19.

On February 17, the Wildlife Center admitted a rare patient – a brown phase Eastern Screech-owl. There are three color morphs of Eastern Screech-owls; red, gray, and brown. In most of this small owl’s range, red and gray phases are equally common, and brown is only seen in 2-3% of Eastern Screech-owls. The rarity of this color morph made this patient especially interesting to the Center’s staff, students, and volunteers.

Latest Update: March 3, 2016

Eastern Screech-owl #16-0063 has been recovering well during the past week. On February 28, Dr. Dana took a set of radiographs to check on the owl’s healing coracoid. The fracture appears to be healing, though is slightly more displaced than it was on February 18. The owl’s wing will remain bandaged until the next set of radiographs on March 9.

Bald Eagle #16-1664

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Bald Eagle #16-1663

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1663 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach.

Bald Eagle #16-1474

On July 6, an animal control officer in Richmond County, Virginia, found a mature Bald Eagle lying on the side of the road. The officer picked up the eagle and transported it to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator at Wildbunch Wildlife Refuge. The rehabilitator noted that the eagle was unable to stand, and often fell to the left when attempting to stand. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Black Bear cubs #16-1441, 1442, and 1443

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Black Bear cub #16-1133

On June 12, a female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The cub had been seen by a homeowner for several days; when it appeared that the cub was without a sow, the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries trapped the cub.