Current Patients

Bald Eagle #15-1250

On June 19, a juvenile male Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Windsor, Virginia. Animal Control Officer Tiffany Webb noticed the bird was uncoordinated and shifting his weight from one leg to the other. The eagle was easily captured and taken to Smithfield Animal Hospital.

Radiographs were taken, but revealed no abnormalities. Due to his neurologic status, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center that same evening by volunteer transporter Michelle Allen.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-1250 was successfully released at Chippokes Plantation State Park on August 27. Dr. Kelli Knight, the Center’s assistant director of veterinary services, had the honor of releasing the eagle in front of a crowd of about 70 people.

As Dr. Kelli tossed the young eagle into the air, the bird took off and flew strongly over the lane leading into the park. The bird flew around a bend and out of sight.

On June 19, a juvenile male Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Windsor, Virginia. Animal Control Officer Tiffany Webb noticed the bird was uncoordinated and shifting his weight from one leg to the other. The eagle was easily captured and taken to Smithfield Animal Hospital.

Radiographs were taken, but revealed no abnormalities. Due to his neurologic status, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center that same evening by volunteer transporter Michelle Allen.

Latest Update: August 21, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eaglet #15-1250 continued to fly well in the A1 enclosure. On Thursday, August 20, the bird was caught up for a pre-release examination and blood work. Dr. Dana, the Center’s veterinary intern, declared the eaglet to be ready for release.

On June 19, a juvenile male Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Windsor, Virginia. Animal Control Officer Tiffany Webb noticed the bird was uncoordinated and shifting his weight from one leg to the other. The eagle was easily captured and taken to Smithfield Animal Hospital.

Radiographs were taken, but revealed no abnormalities. Due to his neurologic status, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center that same evening by volunteer transporter Michelle Allen.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Both Bald Eagles currently housed in flight pen A1 [juvenile eagle #15-1250 and mature eagle #15-0642] are flying well. As of August 12, eagle #15-1250 is flying an average of 17 passes perch-to-perch during daily exercise sessions; the rehabilitation team reports that the bird has great height and form while flying, and the young bird’s stamina has also improved.

On June 19, a juvenile male Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Windsor, Virginia. Animal Control Officer Tiffany Webb noticed the bird was uncoordinated and shifting his weight from one leg to the other. The eagle was easily captured and taken to Smithfield Animal Hospital.

Radiographs were taken, but revealed no abnormalities. Due to his neurologic status, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center that same evening by volunteer transporter Michelle Allen.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1250 and 15-1348 have been doing well together in A2 during the past week. The birds are eating well, and Bald Eaglet #15-1250 is flying very well. Eaglet #15-1348 is likely a couple of weeks younger than the other bird, and is still fairly sedentary.

On July 15, the staff will begin to exercise Bald Eaglet #15-1250 to prepare the bird for release later this summer. 

On June 19, a juvenile male Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Windsor, Virginia. Animal Control Officer Tiffany Webb noticed the bird was uncoordinated and shifting his weight from one leg to the other. The eagle was easily captured and taken to Smithfield Animal Hospital.

Radiographs were taken, but revealed no abnormalities. Due to his neurologic status, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center that same evening by volunteer transporter Michelle Allen.

Latest Update: July 2, 2015

On June 26, young Bald Eagle #15-1250 was moved to flight pen A2 for further assessment. The bird has been doing well; the young eagle is eating and is currently 3.3 kg [initially 2.73 kg]. The eaglet is sharing space with Bald Eagle #15-0355.

Bald Eagle #15-1312

On June 24, a hatch-year female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Northumberland County by Animal Control Officer Kevin Keeve. The eaglet was taken to wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor for immediate care. Diana noted that the bird’s primary feather shafts were infested with maggots, but the young eagle had no other abnormalities.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On June 24, a hatch-year female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Northumberland County by Animal Control Officer Kevin Keeve. The eaglet was taken to wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor for immediate care. Diana noted that the bird’s primary feather shafts were infested with maggots, but the young eagle had no other abnormalities.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On June 24, a hatch-year female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Northumberland County by Animal Control Officer Kevin Keeve. The eaglet was taken to wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor for immediate care. Diana noted that the bird’s primary feather shafts were infested with maggots, but the young eagle had no other abnormalities.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1312 and 15-1339 have been doing well in flight pen A3 during the past week. As many Critter Cam viewers have noted, the eaglets are still young and spend some of the time laying down on the ground to rest and sleep.

On June 24, a hatch-year female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Northumberland County by Animal Control Officer Kevin Keeve. The eaglet was taken to wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor for immediate care. Diana noted that the bird’s primary feather shafts were infested with maggots, but the young eagle had no other abnormalities.

Latest Update: July 1, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-1312 has been eating well during the past few days and has gained weight; the bird now weighs 3.97 kg. The young eagle is very alert and feisty, and on July 1, was moved to flight pen A3.

Bald Eaglet #15-1339

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1312 and 15-1339 have been doing well in flight pen A3 during the past week. As many Critter Cam viewers have noted, the eaglets are still young and spend some of the time laying down on the ground to rest and sleep.

On June 26, the Wildlife Center admitted the another hatch-year Bald Eaglet. This young bird was originally rescued in Fauquier County, Virginia, in late May and was cared for by the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. The bird was initially found down on the ground, in very poor body condition, with maggots and fly eggs on its tail and wing feathers, as well as its legs.

Latest Update: July 1, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-1312 has been eating well during the past few days and has gained weight; the bird now weighs 3.97 kg. The young eagle is very alert and feisty, and on July 1, was moved to flight pen A3.

Bald Eagle #15-1261

On June 18, a young Bald Eagle was found down on the ground at Westlake Country Club at Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia. Dr. Diane D’Orazio from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center went to the country club to retrieve the eagle; the bird was on a cliff overlooking a creek on the golf course. Dr.

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On June 18, a young Bald Eagle was found down on the ground at Westlake Country Club at Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia. Dr. Diane D’Orazio from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center went to the country club to retrieve the eagle; the bird was on a cliff overlooking a creek on the golf course. Dr.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On June 18, a young Bald Eagle was found down on the ground at Westlake Country Club at Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia. Dr. Diane D’Orazio from the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center went to the country club to retrieve the eagle; the bird was on a cliff overlooking a creek on the golf course. Dr.

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well.  Both are eating and gaining weight. 

Bald Eaglet #15-0733

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well.  Both are eating and gaining weight. 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 24, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s daily physical therapy sessions have gone well during the past week. During each physical therapy session, one of the veterinarians extends the eagle’s wing to stretch the muscles and ligaments in the wing.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

Follow-up radiographs of Bald Eagle #15-0733’s healing wing were taken on June 4; they revealed that a callus was continuing to form over the fracture sites. Dr. Meghan noted, however, that the bird’s wing was severely contacted. The bird’s bandage was removed to allow the young eagle to extend its wing; daily physical therapy sessions were scheduled.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 was anesthetized for radiographs on May 29. Dr. Meghan found that calluses were forming on both wing fractures, though there were signs of osteomyelitis

Great Horned Owlet #15-0281

On April 11, a Great Horned Owlet was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found in the middle of the road in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The owlet’s rescuers called the Wildlife Center for advice and attempted to re-nest the young bird. They placed the Great Horned Owlet in a basket and secured it to a high branch of nearby tree located across the street from their home. After several hours of careful observation, there was still no sign of the parents. The Great Horned Owl was removed from the tree and transported to the Wildlife Center that evening.

Latest Update: August 27, 2015

Great Horned Owlet #15-0281 has continued to do well under the care of surrogate Papa G’Ho. Last month, the rehabilitation team started the owlet on weekly “mouse school” [live-prey testing] sessions. While Great Horned Owlet #15-0281 has done well during these weekly live-prey testing sessions, the bird still needs to hone its skills.

On April 11, a Great Horned Owlet was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found in the middle of the road in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The owlet’s rescuers called the Wildlife Center for advice and attempted to re-nest the young bird. They placed the Great Horned Owlet in a basket and secured it to a high branch of nearby tree located across the street from their home. After several hours of careful observation, there was still no sign of the parents. The Great Horned Owl was removed from the tree and transported to the Wildlife Center that evening.

Latest Update: July 12, 2015

Great Horned Owlet #15-0281 is looking more and more like an adult every day and continues to thrive under the care of surrogate Papa G’Ho. On June 29, the veterinary staff performed a feet and feather check and found everything to be within normal limits. During the last few weeks, rehabilitation staff has noticed that the young bird has become very protective of its foster parent and is very feisty.

On April 11, a Great Horned Owlet was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found in the middle of the road in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The owlet’s rescuers called the Wildlife Center for advice and attempted to re-nest the young bird. They placed the Great Horned Owlet in a basket and secured it to a high branch of nearby tree located across the street from their home. After several hours of careful observation, there was still no sign of the parents. The Great Horned Owl was removed from the tree and transported to the Wildlife Center that evening.

Latest Update: June 10, 2015

Great Horned Owlet #15-0281 continues to do well under Papa G’Ho’s care. The owlet is consistently gaining weight and is quickly exchanging its soft, downy feathers for adult plumage. The owlet is also showing the appropriate behaviors toward humans, and the rehabilitation staff has noticed that Papa is very protective of the young owl whenever anyone approaches. The owlet will continue to be monitored by the Center’s staff and will stay with its surrogate throughout the summer.

On April 11, a Great Horned Owlet was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found in the middle of the road in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The owlet’s rescuers called the Wildlife Center for advice and attempted to re-nest the young bird. They placed the Great Horned Owlet in a basket and secured it to a high branch of nearby tree located across the street from their home. After several hours of careful observation, there was still no sign of the parents. The Great Horned Owl was removed from the tree and transported to the Wildlife Center that evening.

Latest Update: April 21, 2015

Great Horned Owlet #15-0281 is doing well with its surrogate dad – Papa G’Ho and the owlet have been seen perching close to each other, and the owlet is getting its fair share of food. 

Bald Eagle #15-0642

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: August 27, 2015

On August 26, Bald Eagle #15-0642 was successfully released back to the wild at Widewater State Park. A crowd of about 100 people attended the release, including the homeowners who initially reported the injured eagle, and the animal control officer who rescued the bird.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: August 25, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0642 was caught up and brought into the Center’s clinic today so that Dr. Dave could band the bird prior to release. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries eagle biologist Jeff Cooper also came today to fit the Bald Eagle with a GPS transmitter.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: August 21, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0642 has been very flying well during the past week. On August 20, the veterinary team caught the eagle for pre-release blood work and an examination.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Both Bald Eagles currently housed in flight pen A1 [juvenile eagle #15-1250 and mature eagle #15-0642] are flying well. As of August 12, eagle #15-1250 is flying an average of 17 passes perch-to-perch during daily exercise sessions; the rehabilitation team reports that the bird has great height and form while flying, and the young bird’s stamina has also improved.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 30, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0642’s carpal [wrist] injuries continued to heal in late June. By the end of the month, the bird was ready to move back into flight pen A1. At first, the staff gave the bird time to get used to the enclosure again while doing a little “self-exercise”. On July 22, the rehabilitation staff began to formally exercise the eagle. So far, exercise is going well; the bird can make strong flights from perch to perch.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 22, 2015

Staff continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0642 daily during early June. The bird appeared to be gaining stamina and strength, but on June 15, the veterinary staff noticed an open wound on the eagle’s left carpus [wrist] during a feet and feather check. The wound was cleaned and the veterinary staff replaced the bird’s carpal bumpers.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

During the past ten days, the rehabilitation staff has been exercising Bald Eagle #15-0642. The eagle has poor stamina, and although the bird can fly to the perches, she often flies low during end-to-end passes in the enclosure and misses perches when landing.

The staff made the decision to separate Bald Eagle #15-0642 (checkered duct tape bumpers) from her roommate, Bald Eagle #15-0355 (high-heels duct tape bumpers), in order to give both birds a better chance at gaining strength and stamina during flight conditioning.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

The staff has monitored Bald Eagle #15-0642 (wearing checkered duct tape bumpers) in the large outdoor enclosure during the past two weeks. The eagle has been maneuvering around the enclosure and has been flying to the higher perches.

On May 30, the veterinary staff cleared the eagle for daily exercise to condition the eagle for release. During the first few days of exercise, the eagle has flown well but has poor stamina. The staff will continue to exercise the bird daily to build the bird’s strength and stamina.

On May 10, a mature female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford County, near Widewater State Park. The bird was unable to fly, and an animal control officer responded to the scene. The officer attempted to catch the bird, which flapped a short distance into nearby water. The animal control officer waded into the water after the bird and was able to catch her. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 21, 2015

On May 12, the veterinary staff determined that Bald Eagle #15-0642 should be moved to an outdoor enclosure [C4]. The eagle was not eating well inside, and Dr. Meghan felt that a larger enclosure outside may encourage the bird to eat and give her more room to move around.

During the course of ten days that the eagle was in the outdoor C-pen, her appetite improved slightly. The veterinary staff supplemented her diet by handfeeding the bird when she did not eat on her own.

Bald Eagle #15-1348

On June 27, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found on the ground with water-logged feathers in Westmoreland County. The eagle was easily captured and transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation by wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation staff noted that the bird was very thin, but found no other injuries. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next day.

Latest Update: August 27, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1348 has continued with daily exercise sessions in A2. While the bird is able to fly more than 10 passes in the flight pen, the bird frequently flies low to the ground after it begins to tire. The eaglet will need to gain more stamina and height during flight conditioning sessions before it can be considered for release.

On June 27, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found on the ground with water-logged feathers in Westmoreland County. The eagle was easily captured and transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation by wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation staff noted that the bird was very thin, but found no other injuries. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next day.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagles #15-1667 and #15-1348 continue to do well in flight pen A2. Both birds are eating well and are consistently making 10 passes perch-to-perch. While the two eagles’ flying abilities are improving, each bird still needs to improve in endurance and perching before they can be considered ready for release. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise the eagles in the upcoming weeks. 

On June 27, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found on the ground with water-logged feathers in Westmoreland County. The eagle was easily captured and transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation by wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation staff noted that the bird was very thin, but found no other injuries. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next day.

Latest Update: August 3, 2015

The staff have been able to observe Bald Eagle #15-1667 during the past few days via Critter Cam; the eagle remained still unable to fly well through Saturday, August 1. The staff noted an intermittent right wing droop via the webcams, and also observed the eagle being a little unstable after hopping off of the A-frame, though the bird recovered her balance well.

On June 27, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found on the ground with water-logged feathers in Westmoreland County. The eagle was easily captured and transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation by wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation staff noted that the bird was very thin, but found no other injuries. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next day.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-1250 and 15-1348 have been doing well together in A2 during the past week. The birds are eating well, and Bald Eaglet #15-1250 is flying very well. Eaglet #15-1348 is likely a couple of weeks younger than the other bird, and is still fairly sedentary.

On July 15, the staff will begin to exercise Bald Eaglet #15-1250 to prepare the bird for release later this summer. 

On June 27, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found on the ground with water-logged feathers in Westmoreland County. The eagle was easily captured and transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation by wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation staff noted that the bird was very thin, but found no other injuries. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next day.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

For a couple of days following admission, Bald Eaglet #15-1348 remained quiet and dull. The veterinary team continued to provide fluids to the bird and hand-fed the eaglet to ensure it was receiving enough nutrition. On June 30, the bird was moved to a small outdoor enclosure, to see if the move would stimulate its appetite. The bird began eating on its own and appeared to be brighter.

Bald Eagle #15-1667

On July 27, a park ranger in Newport News rescued an adult Bald Eagle found on the ground, wet and unable to fly. The ranger brought the eagle to a local emergency veterinary clinic, where staff took radiographs and stabilized the bird before transferring the eagle to a local wildlife rehabilitator with Wildlife Response, Inc.

Latest Update: August 27, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-1667 has consistently been completing 15 passes perch-to-perch during daily flight conditioning sessions in A2.

On July 27, a park ranger in Newport News rescued an adult Bald Eagle found on the ground, wet and unable to fly. The ranger brought the eagle to a local emergency veterinary clinic, where staff took radiographs and stabilized the bird before transferring the eagle to a local wildlife rehabilitator with Wildlife Response, Inc.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagles #15-1667 and #15-1348 continue to do well in flight pen A2. Both birds are eating well and are consistently making 10 passes perch-to-perch. While the two eagles’ flying abilities are improving, each bird still needs to improve in endurance and perching before they can be considered ready for release. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise the eagles in the upcoming weeks. 

On July 27, a park ranger in Newport News rescued an adult Bald Eagle found on the ground, wet and unable to fly. The ranger brought the eagle to a local emergency veterinary clinic, where staff took radiographs and stabilized the bird before transferring the eagle to a local wildlife rehabilitator with Wildlife Response, Inc.

Latest Update: August 3, 2015

The staff have been able to observe Bald Eagle #15-1667 during the past few days via Critter Cam; the eagle remained still unable to fly well through Saturday, August 1. The staff noted an intermittent right wing droop via the webcams, and also observed the eagle being a little unstable after hopping off of the A-frame, though the bird recovered her balance well.

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: August 25, 2015

Eastern Screech-owl #15-0047 spent the early summer acting as a surrogate to two young Eastern Screech-owlets in the Center’s outdoor B-pens until the owlets were transferred to another rehabilitator in June.

Since May, the staff has been monitoring the adult owl’s feather growth; the owl had a number of broken feathers that made the bird loud during flight. Because silent flight is a requirement for an owl to be released, the staff cannot prepare the bird for release until new feathers grow in during the late summer molt.

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: May 29, 2015

On May 26, Dr. Helen Ingraham performed surgery on owlet #15-0857. The prognosis for the young bird was guarded, and unfortunately the owlet died during surgery.

The two remaining owlets – #15-0858 and #15-0859 – were introduced to an adult surrogate, Eastern Screech-owl #15-0047. This owl was admitted to the Wildlife Center on January 20 after it was hit by a car in Botetourt County.

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: May 25, 2015

Throughout the month of April, Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047 improved during daily exercise sessions. The owl’s stamina increased, to the point where the bird was flying the optimum number of laps in the B-pen flight yard each day. Unfortunately, the owl was not silent during flight, due to a number of broken flight feathers. Since silent flight is a requirement for owl release, the staff decided that the owl would need to remain at the Center until it went through a summer molt. The owl is living in a B-pen enclosure, and should molt within the next three months. 

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: March 25, 2015

On March 24, the rehabilitation staff began exercising Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047. The owl did fairly well for its first day of exercise, especially after its recovery from both wing and eye injuries; the staff report that the bird flew a total of nine times perch-to-perch in the yard of the B-pens. The owl grounded several times, and needs to work on height and stamina, but daily exercise sessions will allow the owl to build flight muscles again.

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047 has been healing well since its eye evisceration surgery. The incision site is healing well and the owl is readily eating on its own. The veterinary team continued physical therapy on the owl’s injured wing every three days, and on February 19, took follow-up radiographs. Dr. Meghan noted that the owl’s scapular fracture has healed well and the bird will soon be ready to move outside.

Snapping Turtle #15-1714

On August 2, an adult Snapping Turtle was admitted to the Center after it swallowed a fish hook. Dr. Dana performed the initial examination and found the turtle to be in good condition with no other abnormalities. Radiographs were taken and revealed the hook was in the lower esophagus, close to the turtle’s stomach. Follow-up radiographs and surgery were scheduled for the following day. Snapping Turtle #15- 1714 was fasted overnight and started on a regimen of antibiotics and pain medication.

Latest Update: August 25, 2015

On August 18, Dr. Helen sedated Snapping Turtle #15-1714 and removed the sutures from the turtle’s surgical site. The surgical site looked well-healed and the turtle was bright and alert. Blood was drawn for pre-release blood work, and the turtle was cleared for release by August 21.

The turtle’s rescuers released the turtle at the initial rescue location in Orange County on August 22.
 

Ring-necked Snake #15-1834

On the morning of August 17, a Waynesboro resident found a small Ring-necked Snake stuck to a glue trap. The resident quickly brought the entrapped snake to the Wildlife Center for care.

Latest Update: August 21, 2015

After a day of observation, the veterinary team declared that Ring-necked Snake #15-1834 was behaving normally and had no injuries from being stuck in the glue trap. The snake’s rescuer was called, and on August 19, the rescuer picked up the Ring-necked Snake for release. 

Bald Eagle #15-0355

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been doing well during the past month and has a good appetite – the bird seems to prefer rat versus fish for daily meals.

On July 27, the veterinary staff noticed a small lesion on the eagle’s right wing and applied ointment and a bandage. The staff also noted that the eagle was molting several of her primary and tail feathers – typical for eagles in late summer.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been living with eaglets #15-1250 and #15-1348 during the past couple of weeks. While the adult eagle has not been regularly exercised since the addition of the young eagles, the staff note that the bird still struggles to get lift during flight, and often has trouble flying to high perches. With the eaglets growing and needing more room for exercise of their own, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to a smaller outdoor enclosure.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 22, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 daily. At first it seemed that the eagle was making slight improvements during sessions; however, the bird still has difficulty maintaining flight and is only able to make two to four passes. The eagle also frequently hops along the ground instead of flying during exercise sessions. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and monitor its flying abilities. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has been exercising Bald Eagle #15-0355 in flight pen A1 for the past ten days. During daily exercise sessions, the eagle has poor stamina and cannot gain height during flight; rather than fly end-to-end in the enclosure, the eagle often hops along the ground and cannot fly up to the perches. The eagle has been observed on the Critter Cam as spending most of her time on the lower A-frame perch.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 (wearing high-heel duct tape bumpers) has been monitored in the large outdoor enclosure during the past two weeks. The eagle has been maneuvering around the enclosure but has difficulty flying to the higher perches.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 21, 2015

After moving Bald Eagle #15-0355 to an outdoor pen on May 8, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff monitored the eagle for a left wing droop. The eagle was maneuvering well around the small outdoor enclosure [C1] and showed no signs of a wing droop, although the bird’s appetite was not strong.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 11, 2015

During the past three weeks, veterinary staff continued to conservatively treat Bald Eagle #15-0355’s broken wing and leg. The veterinary staff performed physical therapy sessions and bandage changes every three days. On April 28, Dr. Meghan carefully re-examined the bird’s wing and leg and noted that swelling was decreasing at both fracture sites.

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: August 13, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 was released today at Shenandoah County Park, in front of a crowd of about 60 people. Wildlife Center President Ed Clark and Assistant Vet Director Dr. Kelli Knight were on hand to do the honors; they first talked to the release attendees about the hawk and the problem of lead poisoning. Upon release, the hawk flew away from the crowd, across a small park road, and over the treetops before it finally settled in a tree about 350 yards away. 

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: August 7, 2015

During the past few weeks, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 has gained strength and stamina during daily exercise sessions. At the end of July, the bird went through live-prey testing, to ensure that she could hunt for her own food after her prolonged recovery. The hawk passed “mouse school” and was cleared for release.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: July 13, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 has been flying well during the past few weeks. The bird has gradually gained more stamina, and for the past three days, has started flying at 15 or more passes in the flight enclosure. This level of exercise is considered the “optimum level” for a Red-tailed Hawk in a flight pen. If the bird continues to fly well during the next week, the rehabilitation staff will begin live-prey testing, which is one of the final steps for release. If all continues to go well for the bird, the hawk could be released in August. 

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: June 23, 2015

During the past three weeks, the rehabilitation staff have continued to exercise Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021. The bird is a very fast and agile flier, though the hawk often begins open-mouth breathing after about eight passes in her flight pen. The rehabilitation staff are currently working on gradually increasing the number of flights during each exercise session. The staff hope that the hawk will be able to be released later this summer.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continued to heal in May. Radiographs of the bird’s shoulder on May 10 revealed a nicely-formed callus in the bird’s left shoulder girdle. The hawk was moved to a small outdoor enclosure the following day. After another two weeks of cage rest in an outdoor space, the hawk was moved to a flight pen.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: May 7, 2015

Cage rest continued for Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 after the staff noted the bird drooping her wing in April. While no injuries were noted on initial radiographs, follow-up radiographs were taken on April 26, which did reveal some soft tissue swelling in the bird’s left shoulder. After careful analysis, the veterinary team decided they could not rule out a fracture in the shoulder girdle, so the hawk’s wing was bandaged and the bird was moved into the Center’s holding room for strict cage rest.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: April 21, 2015

After blood work was found to be within normal limits earlier this month, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 began a formal exercise program on April 10. The rehabilitation staff eased the bird into flying more laps in the Center’s FP4 enclosure; the bird lacked stamina at first, but showed improvement after a week of exercise.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: April 8, 2015

During the past three weeks, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 has been seen flying well on her own in one of the Center’s flight pens. A routine blood analysis at the end of March revealed another infection of plasmodium, a blood parasite. The bird began another course of medication to treat the parasite, and remained off exercise for the duration of the treatment.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: March 16, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 has been continuing to improve during the past two weeks, although the bird went through a period of inconsistent eating earlier this month. The rehabilitation staff acclimated the hawk to the outdoor temperatures for several days last weekend, and on March 10 moved the hawk to an outdoor enclosure. The hawk was first moved to an enclosure in the Center's C-pens; these enclosures provide space for patients to move and hop to several different perches, but limit the overall activity of birds that should not yet be in a large flight pen.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: March 4, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to slowly recover from lead poisoning. The hawk is now consistently breathing without increased effort and has moved out of the Center’s critical care chamber into a regular crate in the holding room. The hawk has received two rounds of treatment for the blood parasite that was found in February; another blood analysis will be performed in early March to see if treatment needed to be continued. The bird hasn’t been eating on her own for the past few nights, but readily eats when tease-fed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to surprise the staff with her progress and improvements. The bird is perching well and eating whole food, and the veterinary team has also noted that the bird’s harsh lung sounds have slowly improved. While the hawk still occasionally breathes hard during treatments, the staff have been able to wean her off of supplemental oxygen while being handled. The bird continues to receive oxygen therapy in the Center’s critical care chamber, but Dr. Meghan and Dr.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 10, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to recover from lead poisoning. Last week, Critter Cam viewers were able to watch the treatment of this hawk on the debut of “Hospital Cam”; viewers watched as Dr. Helen removed the ball bandages from the hawk’s feet and tested the bird’s digits for a deep pain response. The hawk currently has a deep pain response in all but one toe. That day, Dr. Helen decided to leave the hawk’s bandages off to see how the bird moved in her crate. The staff were all pleased to see that the hawk was able to perch on her own.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 3, 2015

During the week of January 26, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 developed respiratory issues; when the bird was removed for daily treatments, she would begin struggling for breath after just a few seconds of being handled. Dr. Meghan suspects this could be an issue secondary to the lead toxicity, and could also be due to the hawk’s limited movement and inability to stand. A course of anti-fungal medication was prescribed. Treatment continued, though the veterinary staff were growing concerned over the lack of improvement.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 23, 2015

The veterinary team began another round of chelation therapy on Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 on January 21; after this five-day course of treatment is over, another in-house lead test will be performed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Over the weekend, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 remained bright and alert, although still unable to stand. The hawk’s feet have remained clenched since admission and while the veterinary team performs physical therapy on the bird every day, the vets also decided to place ball bandages on the hawk’s feet. This allows the bird to keep her feet in a somewhat normal position and prevents a self-inflicted talon injury.

Black Bear cubs of 2015

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: August 6, 2015

During the last week of July, Black Bear cub #15-0224 continued to heal in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-0224 has spent the past eight days (since July 23) in the chute of the Large Mammal Isolation facility to limit his mobility and allow staff to observe his movement. The cub was initially vocal following the separation from his “brothers” but he appears to be settling in. Staff elected not to pair him with a “buddy” in the adjoining enclosure because that would require darting one of the healthy cubs; housing the cub alone will also eliminate the possibility of further injuring the leg in playful wrestling matches.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: July 23, 2015

On July 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that Black Bear cub #15-0224 (no tag) was limping. The cub was favoring his hind right limb and seemed to have limited mobility.

On the afternoon of July 23, the veterinary team sedated the cub and brought him to the hospital for a physical exam and radiographs.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 14, 2015

The Black Bear cub move went well on Sunday, June 14. The bears were shifted into the den of Bear Pen #3 at 8:00 a.m.; Bear Pen #2 was set-up ahead of time as a weighing and examination area. Rehabilitation intern Brittany controlled the guillotine door as Dr. Kelli and Leighann were poised in the main area of pen #3 to catch the cubs, one at a time. From there, the cubs were taken into Bear Pen #2 for a quick examination and a weight.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

After much discussion, the staff has come up with a plan for the six Black Bear cubs. The staff knows that pink tag cub [#15-0504] has ringworm, a contagious fungal infection of the skin. On Sunday, June 14, the vet staff will manually catch and restrain the other five cubs for a quick physical examination. As long as the cubs have no signs of ringworm, they will be moved to the Black Bear Complex that same morning.  The staff will begin at 8:00 a.m. 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 10, 2015

During the past two days, the rehabilitation staff have been preparing yard #1 of the Bear Complex for the arrival of the cubs. Acorns and seed were scattered throughout the half-acre area, and two piece of enrichment “furniture” were added: a hammock and a tire bridge!

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: June 8, 2015

The six Black Bear cubs have been doing well during the past week. The rehabilitation staff have been slowly weaning the cubs off of their formula “mush bowls”, and as of June 8, the cubs are no longer receiving any type of formula. The cubs are enjoying a wide variety of adult foods, and the rehabilitation staff have been incorporating a lot of food into enrichment activities for the cubs. If you haven’t watched the Critter Cams lately, here’s a video of food enrichment in action!

 

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 29, 2015

The bear cubs are doing well; they continue to eat … and eat! At this point, the cubs are still receiving mush bowls twice a day, but that will soon change. The bears are also eating a wide variety of adult foods. Grapes are a particular favorite, but so are berries, seeds, nuts, and fresh leafy branches.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 19, 2015

On Tuesday, May 19, Dr. Kelli opened the sliding door between Bear Pen 2 and Bear Pen 3 – giving the six cubs access to both pens. Bear Pen 2 is set up with a tire swing, and the cam view also captures a view of the “sink” (a popular sleeping spot in BP3).

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 13, 2015

All six Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center – they are eating well and gaining weight! The rehabilitation staff now shift the bears into the den area for food deliveries; the staff rarely have direct contact with the cubs at this point. Dr. Kelli was able to train this shifting behavior through positive reinforcement; food was offered in the den area to get the cubs to shift, but at this point, the bears shift on their own.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 8, 2015

Black Bear cubs #15-0503 and 15-0504 have been drinking their formula out of bowl during the past few days, which means it’s time to introduce them to the four other cubs at the Center. Cub #15-0503 lost a little weight, but wildlife rehabilitator Leighann noted that his sibling, #15-0504, has been hogging the formula dishes. Dr.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: May 4, 2015

On Monday, May 4, Dr. Meghan and Dr. Kelli re-evaluated Black Bear cub #15-0458. The cub was walking normally, and did not appear to have any issues with his wrists; he had also gained weight and was eating well. With a clean bill of health, the cub was introduced to the other cubs in Bear Pen 3, bringing the current count to four on Cub Cam.

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: April 28, 2015

The trio of black bear cubs is doing well – as many Critter Cam viewers can attest, the cubs are an energetic and playful bunch! The bears were weighed on Monday:

Cub #15-0224 (no tag): 4.2 kg
Cub #15-0292 (red tag): 5.1 kg
Cub #15-0354 (yellow tag): 3.1 kg

In April 2015, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born in early January to mid-February of 2015. The cubs were suspected separated from their mothers, or possibly orphaned. In most cases, the cub was left alone for a period of time to allow the sow to come back and reunite with it.

Latest Update: April 23, 2015

The three bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The bears are eating well, and as of April 20, the bears were cut back to twice-a-day bottle feedings. In between feedings they are offered a “mush bowl” consisting of thickened formula, soft dog food, and small pieces of fruit. The bears are weighed twice a week to ensure each cub is eating enough food; on April 23, weights were as follows:

Cub #15-0224 (no tag): 3.8 kg
Cub #15-0292 (red tag): 4.6 kg
Cub #15-0354 (yellow tag): 2.6 kg

Black Bear #15-0224

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: August 6, 2015

During the last week of July, Black Bear cub #15-0224 continued to heal in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. 

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-0224 has spent the past eight days (since July 23) in the chute of the Large Mammal Isolation facility to limit his mobility and allow staff to observe his movement. The cub was initially vocal following the separation from his “brothers” but he appears to be settling in. Staff elected not to pair him with a “buddy” in the adjoining enclosure because that would require darting one of the healthy cubs; housing the cub alone will also eliminate the possibility of further injuring the leg in playful wrestling matches.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: July 23, 2015

On July 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that Black Bear cub #15-0224 (no tag) was limping. The cub was favoring his hind right limb and seemed to have limited mobility.

On the afternoon of July 23, the veterinary team sedated the cub and brought him to the hospital for a physical exam and radiographs.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: April 17, 2015

Both bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The new “brothers” were introduced to one another on Tuesday, April 14; the cubs are getting along well. Cub #15-0224 currently weighs 3.08 kg; cub #15-0292 [red ear tag] weighs 3.62 kg.

On Thursday, April 16, the cubs were moved to the Center’s Bear Pens. The cubs are primarily housed in a zinger crate, which is on top of a large heating element to keep the cubs warm at night.

On April 3, a homeowner in Shenandoah County found a small bear cub wandering in his yard.

Latest Update: April 9, 2015

Dr. Kelli reports that Black Bear cub #15-0224 is doing well; the bear is taking his bottle well and currently weighs 2.5 kg. DGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki reports that biologists checked a number of den sites, none was active with bear present. At this time of year, most bear families are now out foraging for spring foods. It’s the time of year to be “bear aware”! 

Fawns of 2015

Each year, the Wildlife Center admits dozens of White-tailed Deer fawns from spring into late summer. As of June 16, the Center is caring for 27 fawns.

Latest Update: August 4, 2015

The Wildlife Center is currently rearing 30 deer fawn. The deer have been separated into two herds in the two larger outdoor deer yards.

The rehabilitation staff and students have dedicated many hours to caring for these fragile patients and preparing twice-daily bottles of formula; during the next six weeks, the staff will wean the fawns off of formula in preparation for release.

Each year, the Wildlife Center admits dozens of White-tailed Deer fawns from spring into late summer. As of June 16, the Center is caring for 27 fawns.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

The number of fawns currently being treated at the Center has risen to 30. Eight of the 30 are now rack-trained and were moved to the Center’s deer yards [DY2] last week. The remaining 22 fawns are slowly transitioning from bottle-feeding to rack-training. Once each fawn is trained and consistently feeding from the bottle-rack, it will be moved into a yard with other fawns.

 

Black Bear cub #15-1651

On July 21, a homeowner in Goshen, Virginia saw three Black Bear cubs near the side of a road. The homeowner continued to see the cubs throughout the week, and on Saturday, July 25 saw one cub staggering by itself. The cub appeared to be very weak. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was notified, and an officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center later that same day.

Latest Update: July 31, 2015

On the morning of July 31, Drs. Helen and Dana decided to move Black Bear cub #15-1651 to the Black Bear Complex with the other bear cubs. Cub #15-1651 has recovered well from her initial dehydration and emaciation; while she still needs to gain more weight, she has improved greatly during her first week of care.

On July 21, a homeowner in Goshen, Virginia saw three Black Bear cubs near the side of a road. The homeowner continued to see the cubs throughout the week, and on Saturday, July 25 saw one cub staggering by itself. The cub appeared to be very weak. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was notified, and an officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center later that same day.

Latest Update: July 30, 2015

Black Bear cub #15-1651 has made a dramatic improvement during the past few days. Each day, the bear has been more feisty and harder for the staff to handle; the cub is eating well and now weighs 9.16 kg.

Black Vultures #15-0706 & #15-0707

On May 13, two young Black Vultures were found outside of a post office in Fluvanna County – under very unusual circumstances! The birds were found in a big dog bowl, inside of a newspaper vending machine. The door to the machine was propped open with a Styrofoam cup. It’s unclear how the vultures came to be in this location, but the people who found the vultures thought it would be best to bring the birds to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 20, 2015

This past weekend, Dr. Dave was able to visit the Black Vulture family and check on the fostered chicks.

When Dr. Dave entered the barn, he noticed all three chicks were perched near the edge of the barn’s loft and were peering down at the ground below. Black Vultures fledge around 90 days and while the young birds still have some down, their tail and primary flight feathers are coming in nicely.

On May 13, two young Black Vultures were found outside of a post office in Fluvanna County – under very unusual circumstances! The birds were found in a big dog bowl, inside of a newspaper vending machine. The door to the machine was propped open with a Styrofoam cup. It’s unclear how the vultures came to be in this location, but the people who found the vultures thought it would be best to bring the birds to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 8, 2015

Dr. Dave and his neighbor have visited the Black Vulture family a few times during the past month, just to quickly peek in on the family and ensure all is well.

In mid-June, Dr. Dave took this photo of the growing vulture chicks:

On May 13, two young Black Vultures were found outside of a post office in Fluvanna County – under very unusual circumstances! The birds were found in a big dog bowl, inside of a newspaper vending machine. The door to the machine was propped open with a Styrofoam cup. It’s unclear how the vultures came to be in this location, but the people who found the vultures thought it would be best to bring the birds to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 29, 2015

After the May 22 visit to the vulture family, Dr. Dave’s neighbor reported that the rat gifts left for the vultures were gone within 24 hours.

Dr. Dave made another visit on May 27. He reports:

On May 13, two young Black Vultures were found outside of a post office in Fluvanna County – under very unusual circumstances! The birds were found in a big dog bowl, inside of a newspaper vending machine. The door to the machine was propped open with a Styrofoam cup. It’s unclear how the vultures came to be in this location, but the people who found the vultures thought it would be best to bring the birds to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 25, 2015

In the week since the two Black Vulture chicks were fostered onto their new family, Dr. Dave and his neighbor have checked on the vultures four different times. On Friday, May 22, Dr. Dave went out again – with some dead rats for supplemental feeding.

Black Bear #15-0427

On April 26, an animal control officer found a Black Bear cub in the middle of the road in Loudoun County. The bear was bright and alert and vocalizing; there was no sign of a sow nearby. The female cub was taken to a small-animal clinic, where a veterinarian examined her and found her to be dehydrated. The cub also had what appeared to be an underdeveloped right eye and a heart murmur. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was contacted, and the cub was transported to the Wildlife Center the following morning.

Latest Update: April 29, 2015

When Black Bear cub #15-0427 was bottle-fed on the afternoon of April 27, the rehabilitation staff reported that the bear sounded congested, with significant lower respiratory sounds. Lung sounds were normal on the bear’s initial physical examination; it’s possible that the bear was having difficulty drinking from a bottle (as opposed to nursing from her mother). The cub spent the night in the Center’s oxygen chamber.

Black Bear cub #15-0292

The Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted another Black Bear cub on the morning of April 13. The male cub was found in Albemarle County on April 8; the cub spent time in a tree for two days with no sign of the sow before a homeowner intervened and caught the bear.

Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the bear shortly after his admission. The cub weighed in a 3.35 kg and was bright, alert, and vocalizing. No injuries were found; the bear was mildly dehydrated.

Latest Update: April 17, 2015

Both bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The new “brothers” were introduced to one another on Tuesday, April 14; the cubs are getting along well. Cub #15-0224 currently weighs 3.08 kg; cub #15-0292 [red ear tag] weighs 3.62 kg.

On Thursday, April 16, the cubs were moved to the Center’s Bear Pens. The cubs are primarily housed in a zinger crate, which is on top of a large heating element to keep the cubs warm at night.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalities in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Bald Eaglet #15-1345

On the evening of June 26, a hatch-year Bald Eagle was found down on the ground at the Naval Weapons Station in Yorktown, Virginia. The bird was captured and taken to a nearby permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator found that the young eagle had a wing fracture; she stabilized the eagle’s wing and arranged transport for the following day.

Black Bear cubs #15-0503 and #15-0504

On the evening of May 4, two more Black Bear cubs were admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cubs were found in Alleghany County; homeowners heard the cubs crying for several days. The homeowners set up a trail cam, but no sow was seen. The cubs were kept by people for several days before they were transported to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear #15-0458

On April 27, a small bear cub was seen in a tree in Page County, Virginia. There were reports of an injured adult bear within a mile of the cub, but upon further investigation, no adult bear was seen. Citizens left the cub in the tree overnight, and on the morning of April 28, the cub reportedly fell out of the tree. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was called, and transport was arranged to get the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear cub #15-0354

The Wildlife Center admitted another male Black Bear cub on Sunday, April 19 – bringing the current cub count to three! This cub was found on the side of the road by a citizen in Bath County, Virginia. The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries contacted the Wildlife Center and requested transport.

Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the cub when he arrived. The cub had no injuries, and was very vocal. Blood work was within normal limits. The cub weighed 2.48 kg; he was marked with a yellow ear tag.