Current Patients

Wood Turtle #14-1495

On June 30, a Wood Turtle was admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. The turtle was being tracked in West Virginia by a graduate student with Ohio University, as a part of an ongoing Wood Turtle study with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.

Latest Update: July 25, 2014

Wood Turtle #14-1495 is doing well post-surgery. The surgical site is healing well, and the turtle is eating on her own – veterinary technician Leigh-Ann Horne says that when she picked up the turtle for daily treatments on Tuesday, the turtle’s mouth was covered in strawberry and pieces of leafy greens.

On June 30, a Wood Turtle was admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. The turtle was being tracked in West Virginia by a graduate student with Ohio University, as a part of an ongoing Wood Turtle study with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

During the first week of July, the veterinary staff monitored Wood Turtle #14-1495’s leg. The staff conducted daily laser therapy treatments on the leg to reduce swelling. Laser therapy is a non-invasive procedure that is to speed recovery, reduce inflammation, and ease pain. Following the first few days of laser therapy, swelling had slightly reduced.

Mallard #14-1007

On June 1, an adult male Mallard was rescued from a park in Rockingham County. The duck was badly injured after he was hit with a shovel by a child in the park, which potentially caused the injury. The Mallard was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-1007.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

Daily swim therapy helped Mallard #14-1007 to rebuild muscle in his injured left leg. Each day following his swim sessions, the Mallard was bearing more weight on the injured leg; by July 9, the Mallard only had a slight limp, and by July 11 the muscles were symmetrical in the left and right legs.

On June 1, an adult male Mallard was rescued from a park in Rockingham County. The duck was badly injured after he was hit with a shovel by a child in the park, which potentially caused the injury. The Mallard was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-1007.

Latest Update: July 4, 2014

On June 29, Dr. Rich performed radiographs of Mallard #14-1007 to check the healing progress of the duck’s leg fracture. The fracture was well-aligned and felt stable during the exam. Dr. Rich removed the remaining pin from the duck’s leg bone. The pins that were sent to an outside lab on June 23 for further testing showed no growths on the culture, which means that there is likely no infection in the duck’s bone.

On June 1, an adult male Mallard was rescued from a park in Rockingham County. The duck was badly injured after he was hit with a shovel by a child in the park, which potentially caused the injury. The Mallard was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-1007.

Latest Update: June 23, 2014

Mallard #14-1007 has been eating well during his recovery period at the Wildlife Center. On June 20, the duck was anesthetized for radiographs to check on the healing progress of the duck’s fractured leg. A callous is beginning to form at the fracture site; the team decided to begin the “dynamic destabilization” process on Monday by removing some of the pins in the duck’s leg.

On June 1, an adult male Mallard was rescued from a park in Rockingham County. The duck was badly injured after he was hit with a shovel by a child in the park, which potentially caused the injury. The Mallard was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #14-1007.

Latest Update: June 10, 2014

Mallard #14-1007 is doing well after its June 2 surgery. Dr. Rich Sim reports that the duck is still not bearing weight on the left leg, but that is to be expected this soon after surgery. Swelling and bruising on the leg have improved.

Black Bear cubs of 2014

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

A release date has been set for the two yearlings and five cubs that are currently at the Wildlife Center – the bear “families” will be released on August 4. DGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki will pick up the seven bears that morning and will transport them to the release site.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: July 17, 2014

The five cubs and two yearlings have been doing well during the past month in the Center’s Bear Complex. The two families have blended into one large bear family and the cubs can regularly be seen (via Critter Cam) interacting with one another as well as both surrogate yearlings.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: June 17, 2014

Black Bear family #2 [yearling 14-0184, cub #14-0224, and cub #14-0394] were moved to yard #1 of the Black Bear Complex on Monday, June 16. Dr. Kristin darted the yearling bear to anesthetize her for a safe move. The cubs were able to be caught and placed into crates for the transport to the yard.  Each cub weighed about 4.0 kg. 

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: June 12, 2014

Black Bear Family #1 – the yearling and three cubs – have been doing well in the Center’s Black Bear Complex. While the bears can be hard to spot sometimes due to all the trees and leaves, many Critter Cam viewers have enjoyed glimpses of the four bears climbing, lounging, or even swimming! On June 9, all four bears were spotted together, swimming in the large tub in the bear yard. The family group seems to be sticking close to one another.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: June 3, 2014

Bear Family #1 was successfully moved to the Black Bear Complex [yard #1] on the afternoon of June 3. Dr. Rich darted and anesthetized yearling #14-0126 and cub #14-0350; cubs #14-0252 and 0253 were able to be captured by hand and put directly into crates. All bears were weighed prior to the move:

Yearling #14-0126: 33 kg
Cub #14-0252: 11 kg
Cub #14-0253: 13.6 kg
Cub #14-0350: 17 kg

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: June 3, 2014

Black Bear family #1 – consisting of yearling #14-0126 and three cubs – will be moved to the Center’s Black Bear Complex on Tuesday, June 3. Dr. Rich will be leading the “immobilization and moving” team; the yearling and the largest cub [#14-0350] will need to be darted and anesthetized. Dr. Rich will assess how large and feisty the two smaller cubs are to determine the best and safest way to move them. Once moved, the bears will recover and re-group in the transition pen #1, before the staff open the door into the adjoining yard.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

Both Black Bear families are doing well in the Center’s Bear Pens. The three cubs in family #1 have been weaned from formula and have transitioned onto an adult bear meal – the cubs are eating a variety of veggies, fruits, insects, dog food, seeds, nuts, and browse. The rehabilitation staff are ready to move these three growing cubs, along with their surrogate yearling sister, into the Bear Complex.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: May 16, 2014

All of the Black Bears in the Center’s Bear Complex are doing well – both family groups are getting along [within each family unit] and can frequently be seen playing or sleeping on Critter Cam. On May 15, certified wildlife rehabilitator Kelli and rehab intern Jordan attempted to weigh the two cubs in Bear Pen #3 – they were only able to catch the female cub, who weighed in at 4.1 kg. The male cub preferred to stay near the yearling in the den.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: May 9, 2014

Family Unit #2 – made up of yearling #14-0184, cub #14-0224, and cub #14-0394 – appear to be doing well together. The yearling showed immediate interest in the cubs when they were being slowly introduced in the zinger crate. The cubs were allowed out of the crate on May 7, and by the following morning, the yearling was vigorously wrestling with both cubs.

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: May 5, 2014

All five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center – they are eating well, and growing quickly!

In April 2014, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were born in January or February of 2014. Some cubs were suspected to be orphaned; several of these cubs were found and kept by people, until the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries confiscated the young bears.

Latest Update: April 24, 2014

All of the bears in the Center’s Bear Pens are doing well. On April 22, new cub #14-0350 was introduced to the bear pen. The cub spent the first day in a zinger crate as a slow introduction to the other two cubs, and on the morning of April 23, was let out of the crate and into the enclosure. After the cubs ate their morning mush bowls, the three cubs quickly started wrestling and playing together.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anethetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalties in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 23, 2014

On the afternoon of July 22, veterinary intern Dr. Meghan Feeney took Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 to surgery to remove the bird’s left eye. Dr. Dave McRuer, the Center’s veterinary director, was present to assist.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 21, 2014

During the past week, Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 received several more eye assessments. Dr. Dave McRuer, the Center’s veterinary director, noted that additional scar tissue was visible in the falcon’s injured eye on Thursday, July 17; on Saturday, Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, noted additional changes in the eye. On Monday, July 21, the falcon’s eye had visibly changed; the eye was atrophied and the falcon seemed to be reacting more to light [possibly indicating pain].

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 continues to eat well and gain weight at the Wildlife Center. On July 7, Dr. Rich re-examined the falcon’s injured left eye. Last week, there was a large blood clot present in the bird’s eye, which prevented a full evaluation of all of the structures in the back of the eye. This week, the clot has developed into a band of connective tissue in the middle portion of the bird’s eye. With so much damage sustained to the eye, the Peregrine Falcon has been deemed non-releasable.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: June 30, 2014

Dr. Rich examined the injured eye of Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 again this morning. He found that while the blood in the front portion of the eye has cleared, there is still a large blood clot in the middle part of the bird’s eye.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: June 23, 2014

Dr. Rich re-checked the injured eye of Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 on the morning of June 23.

Bald Eaglet #14-0867

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

On July 22, the rehabilitation staff caught up two Bald Eaglets -- #14-0649 and 0867 – and moved them to flight pen A1. Bald Eaglet #14-0650 remains in flight pen A3. Dividing the three birds up into two flight pens will allow the staff to more safely exercise the large birds in preparation for release.

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: July 17, 2014

On July 16, DGIF biologist Jeff Cooper came to the Wildlife Center to band and fit Bald Eaglets #14-0649, 0650, and 0867 with GPS transmitters. Each eaglet was weighed and measured prior to being fitted with a transmitter. The transmitter fitting went smoothly, and the three eaglets were returned to flight pen A3. The Wildlife Center will have access to the transmitter tracking data and will share updates after the eagles’ release.

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

Bald Eaglets #14-0649, 650, and 867 are doing well in the Center’s A3 flight pen. The birds are eating well and their flight feathers are in good condition. The birds can often be seen on a variety of high perches via Critter Cam.

Current weights:
BAEA #14-0649: 4.15 kg
BAEA #14-0650: 3.65 kg
BAEA #14-0867: 3.82 kg

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: June 24, 2014

The four Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 are all doing well. Eaglets #14-0649 and 0650 are becoming more adept at flying in the enclosure; Bald Eaglet #14-0867 joined the two eagle siblings in the main part of the flight enclosure on June 20. There have been some minor eagle scuffles as the three young eagles figured out the “pecking order”; eagle #14-0649 seems to be the main instigator. All were noted to be in good health during their bi-weekly foot and feather check on June 23.

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: June 17, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0867 was anesthetized for radiographs on Saturday, June 14, to check the healing progress of the bird's fractured pelvis. Dr. Kristin noted that the fracture was well-calloused, although was displaced -- meaning that the pelvic bone was not perfectly aligned. The bird appears to be bearing weight evenly on both legs, and does not have trouble maneuvering its legs, so the veterinary staff are optimistic about recovery.

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: June 6, 2014

On June 3, Bald Eaglet #14-0866 died during its morning treatments. Dr. Rich suspects that the stress of healing a significant fracture, the bird’s lack of appetite, and a possible systemic infection were too much for the bird to overcome. 

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: June 2, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0866 continues to heal after its wing-repair surgery. The young eagle showed a decreased appetite following surgery; the veterinary staff began tube-feeding the eaglet on May 29. The rehabilitation staff also offered the eaglet a diet of chopped rat. Throughout the weekend, the eaglet appeared brighter and began eating some of its meal on its own; the veterinary staff continue to supplement the bird’s diet with tube-feeding.

On May 22, severe storms rolled through eastern Virginia. In Tappahannock, Virginia, a small tornado touched down and destroyed an eagle’s nest containing two eight-week old eaglets. The eaglets were found the following morning and were picked up by the DGIF eagle biologist. The birds were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: May 29, 2014

On May 26, Bald Eaglet #14-0866 was taken to surgery to repair its left humeral fracture. Dr. Krisitin Britton, the Center’s veterinary intern, inserted a long pin into the length of the bone to stabilize the fracture. Two additional pins were inserted into the bone at each end of the humerus, to provide stabilization through an external fixator. The veterinary team bandaged the wing carefully and placed a body wrap on the eaglet to restrict movement.

Bald Eaglets #14-0649 and #14-0650

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

On July 22, the rehabilitation staff caught up two Bald Eaglets -- #14-0649 and 0867 – and moved them to flight pen A1. Bald Eaglet #14-0650 remains in flight pen A3. Dividing the three birds up into two flight pens will allow the staff to more safely exercise the large birds in preparation for release.

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: July 17, 2014

On July 16, DGIF biologist Jeff Cooper came to the Wildlife Center to band and fit Bald Eaglets #14-0649, 0650, and 0867 with GPS transmitters. Each eaglet was weighed and measured prior to being fitted with a transmitter. The transmitter fitting went smoothly, and the three eaglets were returned to flight pen A3. The Wildlife Center will have access to the transmitter tracking data and will share updates after the eagles’ release.

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

Bald Eaglets #14-0649, 650, and 867 are doing well in the Center’s A3 flight pen. The birds are eating well and their flight feathers are in good condition. The birds can often be seen on a variety of high perches via Critter Cam.

Current weights:
BAEA #14-0649: 4.15 kg
BAEA #14-0650: 3.65 kg
BAEA #14-0867: 3.82 kg

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: June 24, 2014

The four Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 are all doing well. Eaglets #14-0649 and 0650 are becoming more adept at flying in the enclosure; Bald Eaglet #14-0867 joined the two eagle siblings in the main part of the flight enclosure on June 20. There have been some minor eagle scuffles as the three young eagles figured out the “pecking order”; eagle #14-0649 seems to be the main instigator. All were noted to be in good health during their bi-weekly foot and feather check on June 23.

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 23, eaglets #14-0649 and #14-0650 fledged! The eaglets flew from the tower to the ground of the A3 flight pen.

In the past week, the eaglets have been learning to fly to higher perches in the enclosure and have been perching near the adult eagle in the flight pen [#14-0261].

On May 12, two young eaglets were found down on the ground in Chincoteague, Virginia, on the Eastern Shore. A biologist from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation – the birds’ nest blew down after a storm, and was unable to be restored. The biologist estimated that the two eagles are about two weeks away from fledging. The eaglets were transported to a permitted rehabilitator for the night, and transported to the Wildlife Center by DGIF the following day.

Latest Update: May 19, 2014

Since their admission, Bald Eaglets #14-0649 and #14-0650 have been bright and active with strong appetites. The eaglets have been branching out from their nest, flapping their wings, and hopping to the different small perches in the tower of A3. This indicates that the eaglets may be close to fully fledging.

 

 
 

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 has continued to have trouble gaining height while flying. The eagle exercises an average of eight times perch-to-perch in her enclosure, but isn’t flying well enough for release. On July 21, routine blood work revealed a low white blood cell count, which could indicate an underlying infection.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 has been flying well in its large outdoor enclosure. The eagle’s right wing droop was noted inconsistently into mid-June, but was apparently not affecting the bird’s ability to fly the length of the enclosure.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 21, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was seen perching in its enclosure displaying an intermittent right wing droop that was not present on intake. The veterinary team also noticed that Bald Eagle #14-0261 had been continuously chewing on both of the protective carpal bumpers that had been placed on its wings. While the droop does not seem to be affecting the bird’s ability to fly, it is suspected to be the result of mild discomfort caused by the carpal bumpers.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was re-radiographed on May 20 to check on the healing progress of the bird’s fractured wing tip. Dr. Rich found that the fractured minor metacarpal was completely healed. He also noted a small bone spur on the tip of the eagle’s wing [noted with the red arrow below]; this could be due to a ligament injury that occurred with the fracture. Dr. Rich does not anticipate that this will affect the eagle’s flight; the injury will be re-checked on radiographs in one month.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

On May 7, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was caught up for anesthesia and radiographs. Dr. Rich was pleased to see the eagle’s fracture had a stable callous over the fracture site; however, the fracture still needs additional time to fully heal. Dr. Rich removed the eagle’s wing wrap, and placed it back in the C-pen. The bird will remain on cage rest for the next two weeks. 

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The veterinary team has continued to monitor Bald Eagle #14-0261 during the last few weeks. Each day, the staff visually checks to ensure that the bandage on the Bald Eagle’s wing is clean and intact.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Black Bear #14-0364

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

On the afternoon of July 21, Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, darted and anesthetized Black Bear yearling #14-0364. The bear was carried down to the Center’s hospital for follow-up radiographs to assess his jaw injury. The bear has been unable to fully close his mouth since the injury, though has been eating small amounts of soft food and has been taking pain medications in food. The bear has been observed via an internal Critter Cam and has been active.

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: July 17, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0364, who was injured in a fall from a tree on Tuesday, continues to hold his mouth slightly open. Via internal Critter Cam, the staff were able to watch the bear today – while the bear’s mouth is held open at times, the bear can move its jaws and can hold his mouth partially closed. The bear appears to be moving the jaw open and partially closed.

The veterinary team would like to further observe the bear throughout the weekend, and plan to take additional radiographs of the bear’s head, likely on Monday, July 21.
 

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: July 16, 2014

On the morning of July 16, Dr. Dave and certified wildlife rehabilitator Amber both checked on yearling #14-0364 in the Large Mammal isolation building.

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On the morning of July 15, the Center’s veterinary staff and a VDGIF biologist prepared for the release of four yearling black bears - #14-0657, #14-0142, #14-0301, and #14-0364.

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: July 3, 2014

The four Black Bear yearlings #14-0142, 301, 364, and 657 – have been doing well this spring at the Wildlife Center. The bears can often be seen via Critter Cam lounging in trees. The bears have visibly put on weight, and are in good condition.

Now that food is very plentiful and the berries are out, it’s time to release these four yearling bears. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries will pick up and release the bears on Tuesday, July 15.
 

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: May 9, 2014

On May 8, Black Bear yearlings #14-0301 and #14-0364 were darted and anesthetized so they could be moved to the Center’s Black Bear Complex. Dr. Kristin, the Center’s veterinary intern, darted the two bears and gave them a quick physical examination. Both bears were in good body condition and appeared to be doing well. Bear #14-0301 weighed 15.7 kg; bear #14-0364 weighed 14.9 kg.

Both bears were placed in yard #2 of the Black Bear complex, along with female yearling #14-0142.
 

A thin, lethargic Black Bear yearling was seen in Cumberland County during the week of April 20 – the bear was hanging around a subdivision for several days. On April 22, the bear was stumbling down a road; a DGIF biologist responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear easily. The yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center on April 23 as patient #14-0364.

Latest Update: May 2, 2014

Black Bears #14-0301 and 14-0364 have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The two yearlings seem to be getting along just fine, and both are eating well. On April 30, Dr. Rich checked on them to assess their appearance; he felt that both were improving and are in better body condition. During the week of May 5, the two bears will be darted, anesthetized, weighed, and moved to Black Bear Complex yard #2. 

Black Bear #14-0657

On May 13, a female Black Bear yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Homeowners in Augusta County, Virginia called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when they noticed the bear hanging around their property. The bear appeared lethargic and was not acting as a normal yearling would. A biologist with DGIF responded to the scene and was easily able to sedate and trap the bear.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On the morning of July 15, the Center’s veterinary staff and a VDGIF biologist prepared for the release of four yearling black bears - #14-0657, #14-0142, #14-0301, and #14-0364.

On May 13, a female Black Bear yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Homeowners in Augusta County, Virginia called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when they noticed the bear hanging around their property. The bear appeared lethargic and was not acting as a normal yearling would. A biologist with DGIF responded to the scene and was easily able to sedate and trap the bear.

Latest Update: July 3, 2014

The four Black Bear yearlings #14-0142, 301, 364, and 657 – have been doing well this spring at the Wildlife Center. The bears can often be seen via Critter Cam lounging in trees. The bears have visibly put on weight, and are in good condition.

Now that food is very plentiful and the berries are out, it’s time to release these four yearling bears. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries will pick up and release the bears on Tuesday, July 15.
 

On May 13, a female Black Bear yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Homeowners in Augusta County, Virginia called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when they noticed the bear hanging around their property. The bear appeared lethargic and was not acting as a normal yearling would. A biologist with DGIF responded to the scene and was easily able to sedate and trap the bear.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

On May 19, the veterinary team darted and anesthetized Black Bear yearling #14-0657 for a physical examination. The rehabilitation staff reported that the bear has been eating, although doesn’t appear to have the appetite of many of the other yearlings treated at the Center this year. Dr. Rich confirmed that the bear is still thin, although has gained weight – the bear weighed in at 13.7 kg. Blood was drawn for analysis; the bear is still slightly anemic.

Black Bear #14-0301

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On the morning of July 15, the Center’s veterinary staff and a VDGIF biologist prepared for the release of four yearling black bears - #14-0657, #14-0142, #14-0301, and #14-0364.

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 3, 2014

The four Black Bear yearlings #14-0142, 301, 364, and 657 – have been doing well this spring at the Wildlife Center. The bears can often be seen via Critter Cam lounging in trees. The bears have visibly put on weight, and are in good condition.

Now that food is very plentiful and the berries are out, it’s time to release these four yearling bears. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries will pick up and release the bears on Tuesday, July 15.
 

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 9, 2014

On May 8, Black Bear yearlings #14-0301 and #14-0364 were darted and anesthetized so they could be moved to the Center’s Black Bear Complex. Dr. Kristin, the Center’s veterinary intern, darted the two bears and gave them a quick physical examination. Both bears were in good body condition and appeared to be doing well. Bear #14-0301 weighed 15.7 kg; bear #14-0364 weighed 14.9 kg.

Both bears were placed in yard #2 of the Black Bear complex, along with female yearling #14-0142.
 

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 2, 2014

Black Bears #14-0301 and 14-0364 have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The two yearlings seem to be getting along just fine, and both are eating well. On April 30, Dr. Rich checked on them to assess their appearance; he felt that both were improving and are in better body condition. During the week of May 5, the two bears will be darted, anesthetized, weighed, and moved to Black Bear Complex yard #2. 

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 22, 2014

Black Bear #14-0301 has been doing well as he recovers from his emaciated condition. The bear is eating well and gaining weight, and his attitude is consistently bright and feisty. At this point, the risk for re-feeding syndrome should be over.  The veterinary team moved the bear to the outdoor Large Mammal Isolation facility on April 21.  

On April 14, the Wildlife Center admitted another yearling Black Bear – the 11th bear admitted in 2014. The male yearling was seen hanging around a house in Greene County, Virginia; the bear appeared to be quite thin and very lethargic. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries responded to the scene, tranquilized the bear, and transported him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 18, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0301 is recovering well so far from his emaciated condition. The bear is eating well, and the staff are slowly increasing the size of the bear’s meals. At this point, the bear is still receiving a specialized diet for thin/emaciated animals. The bear’s hydration level is improving, although the veterinary team is still giving subcutaneous fluids each day.  

Black Bear #14-0142

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On the morning of July 15, the Center’s veterinary staff and a VDGIF biologist prepared for the release of four yearling black bears - #14-0657, #14-0142, #14-0301, and #14-0364.

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: July 3, 2014

The four Black Bear yearlings #14-0142, 301, 364, and 657 – have been doing well this spring at the Wildlife Center. The bears can often be seen via Critter Cam lounging in trees. The bears have visibly put on weight, and are in good condition.

Now that food is very plentiful and the berries are out, it’s time to release these four yearling bears. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries will pick up and release the bears on Tuesday, July 15.
 

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Black Bears #14-0142 and #14-0184 were caught up today for a weigh-in and blood draw. Both were very feisty and appeared to be in good body condition. Black Bear #14-0142 weighed in at 14.3 kg; Black Bear #14-0184 was 10.1 kg. Both yearlings were moved to yard #2 of the Black Bear Complex.

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

On March 21, the Wildlife Center staff caught Black Bears #14-0126 and #14-0142 in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Both bears were given a quick physical examination and were weighed; both proved to be difficult to capture – they wanted nothing to do with people!

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 14, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0142 remains bright, alert, and feisty and continues to show improvement. On March 12, the yearling was switched to a regular bear meal and she immediately went to her food bowl when returned to her enclosure. After the staff confirmed that the bear was eating well on her own and blood work showed improvements, the yearling was moved to the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation and joined Black Bear yearling #14-0126.

During the week of March 3, homeowners in Rappahannock County spotted a small yearling hanging around in their yard. After seeing the bear for several days, the homeowners contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer came to the scene and baited a dog crate with food; the bear entered the crate and was successfully trapped. The DGIF officer transported the bear to the Center on March 7.

Latest Update: March 10, 2014

On Saturday, March 8, Dr. Kristin anesthetized Black Bear yearling #14-0142 for a complete examination. Dr. Kristin found the bear to be thin and dehydrated, with no visible injuries. The female bear weighed in at 5.73 kg. Radiographs revealed no fractures, but did indicate some changes in the bear’s gastrointestinal tract – Dr. Kristin suspects that the bear’s intestinal system had slowed and was not moving food along as it should, due to a prolonged period of not eating.

Golden Eagle #14-1579

On July 8, the Wildlife Center received an unusual patient admission – an immature Golden Eagle that was found in Goochland County. The eastern population of Golden Eagles spends the breeding season in Canada; Golden Eagles are typically only found in Virginia in the winter -- in the western mountainous part of the state. In early 2011, the Center treated and released a Golden Eagle after it was fitted with a transmitter; website visitors were able to "watch” the bird migrate north in March.

Latest Update: July 12, 2014

On the morning of July 12, certified wildlife rehabilitator Kelli performed a morning check on all the patients in the Center's holding room. She found Golden Eagle #14-1579 deceased in the critical care chamber. The eagle's prognosis had been quite grave due to his severe leg injury, emaciated condition, and recovery from a difficult and lengthy surgery.

On July 8, the Wildlife Center received an unusual patient admission – an immature Golden Eagle that was found in Goochland County. The eastern population of Golden Eagles spends the breeding season in Canada; Golden Eagles are typically only found in Virginia in the winter -- in the western mountainous part of the state. In early 2011, the Center treated and released a Golden Eagle after it was fitted with a transmitter; website visitors were able to "watch” the bird migrate north in March.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

The veterinary team were delighted on the morning of July 11 to find that Golden Eagle #14-1579 made it through another night. The bird was quiet and semi-alert when it was caught up for morning treatments; the veterinary team tube-fed and medicated the eagle before placing it back in the Center’s critical care chamber. Blood was drawn this morning for analysis; results revealed an even lower PVC [packed cell volume]. The veterinary team remain very guarded about the eagle’s prognosis.

On July 8, the Wildlife Center received an unusual patient admission – an immature Golden Eagle that was found in Goochland County. The eastern population of Golden Eagles spends the breeding season in Canada; Golden Eagles are typically only found in Virginia in the winter -- in the western mountainous part of the state. In early 2011, the Center treated and released a Golden Eagle after it was fitted with a transmitter; website visitors were able to "watch” the bird migrate north in March.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

Golden Eagle #14-1579 survived the night following his lengthy surgery. The veterinary team noted that the eagle was lethargic on the morning of July 10, though was successfully tube-fed during morning treatments.  The eagle was alert in the afternoon.

The Golden Eagle will be tube-fed twice a day and, for the immediate future, will continue to live in the critical care chamber in the Center’s holding room.

On July 8, the Wildlife Center received an unusual patient admission – an immature Golden Eagle that was found in Goochland County. The eastern population of Golden Eagles spends the breeding season in Canada; Golden Eagles are typically only found in Virginia in the winter -- in the western mountainous part of the state. In early 2011, the Center treated and released a Golden Eagle after it was fitted with a transmitter; website visitors were able to "watch” the bird migrate north in March.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

On the afternoon of July 9, Dr. Rich, along with technician Leigh-Ann Horne and students Gabby and Tori, took Golden Eagle #14-1579 to surgery to repair the bird’s fractured leg. Dr. Rich had serious concerns about the eagle’s ability to withstand surgery; the blood work revealed a very low “packed cell volume” (PCV), which indicates a low level of red blood cells. In many cases, a patient with such a low PCV would be stabilized first, possibly with a blood transfusion and supportive care. Due to the severity of the fracture, Dr.

Common Raven #14-1100

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been doing well in her outdoor enclosure. The staff continues to monitor her feather growth and appetite. The bird is bright and active, and she maneuvers well on the “jungle gym” of perches set up in her enclosure.

To keep this patient entertained, the rehabilitation staff has given the bird plenty of enrichment items, including rotting logs and fruit stuffed with mice.

Eastern Screech-Owls of 2014

On May 19, the Wildlife Center began admitting Eastern Screech-Owlets from throughout Virginia. Many of these young owls were suspected to be orphans, while others were brought to the Center after their nests were destroyed. 

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

The Eastern Screech-Owlets of 2014 have been doing well and have been observed practicing their flying abilities. On June 23, Eastern Screech-Owlet #14-1387 was referred to the Wildlife Center as a healthy orphan from Rockfish Wildlife Sanctuary in Charlottesville, Virginia. After an initial exam, the owl joined the three owls [#14-1178, #14-1268, and #14-0082] in B6. Presently there are nine Eastern Screech-Owlets in the Center’s B-Pens.

Bald Eagle #14-0687

On May 12, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Sandbridge, Virginia Beach. The bird was unable fly and was easily captured. It was transported to a local emergency clinic before it was referred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. A volunteer transporter drove the bird to the Wildlife Center on May 14.

Latest Update: July 8, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0687 was successfully released at the Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center on Tuesday, July 8. A crowd of more than 150 people were in attendance.

Wildlife Center president Ed Clark released the bird at the Owl Creek Public Boat Ramp. After the bird was released, it flew to a nearby tree. Crows came to investigate; after a 10-minute rest, the eagle flew in large, high circles over the release area, before turning south and heading in the direction of Sandbridge.

 

On May 12, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Sandbridge, Virginia Beach. The bird was unable fly and was easily captured. It was transported to a local emergency clinic before it was referred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. A volunteer transporter drove the bird to the Wildlife Center on May 14.

Latest Update: July 3, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0687 has been flying well in flight pen A1. On July 2, pre-release blood work was drawn for analysis; results came back within normal limits. The Wildlife Center staff began exploring release options in Virginia Beach, where the eagle was rescued.

On May 12, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Sandbridge, Virginia Beach. The bird was unable fly and was easily captured. It was transported to a local emergency clinic before it was referred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. A volunteer transporter drove the bird to the Wildlife Center on May 14.

Latest Update: June 24, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0687 has been exercising well during the past week. The bird is a strong flier and is flying about 12-15 times during each session. After Bald Eagle #14-0450 is released, #14-0687 will be moved to A1 for additional exercise and monitoring. If all goes well, the bird will be released in early July.

On May 12, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Sandbridge, Virginia Beach. The bird was unable fly and was easily captured. It was transported to a local emergency clinic before it was referred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. A volunteer transporter drove the bird to the Wildlife Center on May 14.

Latest Update: June 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0687 was moved to flight pen A2 on June 14. After a few days of settling in, the eagle began a daily exercise program on June 18. Certified wildlife rehabilitator Amber reports that the eagle flew the length of the pen 12 times during its first session! Exercise will continue during the next two weeks; if all goes well, the staff hope that the eagle could be released soon.

On May 12, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Sandbridge, Virginia Beach. The bird was unable fly and was easily captured. It was transported to a local emergency clinic before it was referred to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. A volunteer transporter drove the bird to the Wildlife Center on May 14.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0687 has been eating well and gaining weight at the Wildlife Center. On May 15, the eagle was moved in its crate to the Center’s outdoor metal cage complex – Dr. Rich wanted to continue to cage rest the eagle, but wanted the eagle to be in a quieter outdoor location. If the eagle continues to do well, the veterinary team will move the bird to larger C-pen enclosure on May 22. 

Bald Eagle #14-0450

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 26, Wildlife Center president Ed Clark and diagnostic intern Rosemary drove Bald Eagle #14-0450 to Lands End Wildlife Management Area for release. A crowd of about 45 people were in attendance to watch the bird’s return to the wild.

After Ed tossed the bird into the sky, the crowd watched as the eagle flew out of sight … and then turned around and headed back, flying overhead in the opposite direction.
 

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: June 24, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0450 has been flying well during the past week. On Sunday, June 22, the veterinary team drew blood from the eagle for a pre-release analysis. Results came back within normal limits, and Dr. Rich cleared the bird for release.

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: June 19, 2014

Certified wildlife rehabilitator Amber reports that Bald Eagle #14-0450 has been flying well in flight pen A1. The bird has good height, stamina, and form while flying. As long as exercise continues to go well this weekend, the bird will be scheduled for a pre-release examination and blood work. 

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: June 12, 2014

On May 23, Bald Eagle #14-0450 was moved to flight pen A2 to better evaluate its flying abilities. Initially, the bird was stubborn and unwilling to fly more than two passes before grounding during flight conditioning sessions. The Bald Eagle also appeared to have difficulty regaining height when flying to its perches. The rehabilitation staff continued to exercise the bird and it gradually began to show improvement.

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

With its steady improvement, Bald Eagle #14-0450 was moved to one of the Center’s largest flight pens, A1, on May 14. At first the bird had trouble flying to higher perches. To help the eagle build strength, the rehabilitation staff placed a series of lower perches in the enclosure that increased in height. During the following days, the Bald Eagle’s flying abilities improved, and it is now able to reach the swinging perches in the enclosure.

On May 1, an adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bird found on the side of the road in King George County, Virginia; the eagle was likely hit by a vehicle.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

The day after its admission, Bald Eagle #14-0450’s crate was placed in an outdoor C-pen enclosure. The staff needed to keep the eagle in a crate due to the daily chelation therapy, but the team wanted to move the eagle outside and farther away from humans since the bird was otherwise stable.

Eastern Screech-Owlets #14-0913 and #14-0914

On May 22, two Eastern Screech-Owl hatchlings were found in Roanoke County, Virginia. The young owlets were taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center where they were examined and found to be good condition. Both owlets were fed and placed in an incubator. On May 26, the hatchlings were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: June 5, 2014

On May 28, Eastern Screech-Owlet #14-0774 was moved to a small enclosure in the Center’s B-pens. The owlet was placed with a surrogate – non-releasable Eastern Screech-Owl patient #14-0082.

On May 31, both owls were joined by two additional Eastern Screech-Owlet patients - #14-0913 and #14-0914. The four owls remained in a small enclosure in the Center’s B-yard for several days to acclimate to a larger space.

Eastern Screech-Owlet #14-0774

On May 19, an Eastern Screech-Owlet was rescued in Albemarle County. The nestling was trapped in a tree cavity in a pile of logs after a stand of trees was cut. A logger observed the young owl in the hollow of a tree in the pile and noticed that the owl’s foot appeared stuck. The rescuer used heavy equipment to move the logs, working carefully for two hours to free the young owl. Following the dramatic rescue, the logger transported the owlet to the Wildlife Center, where the bird was admitted as patient #14-0774.

Latest Update: June 5, 2014

On May 28, Eastern Screech-Owlet #14-0774 was moved to a small enclosure in the Center’s B-pens. The owlet was placed with a surrogate – non-releasable Eastern Screech-Owl patient #14-0082.

On May 31, both owls were joined by two additional Eastern Screech-Owlet patients - #14-0913 and #14-0914. The four owls remained in a small enclosure in the Center’s B-yard for several days to acclimate to a larger space.

Barred Owlet #14-0668

On May 13, the owlet was admitted to the Center as patient #14-0668. The bird was bright and feisty, well-hydrated, and showed no signs of injury from falling out of its nesting tree. The owl made appropriate warning noises with its beak [a clacking noise] when the veterinary staff approached the bird’s cage.

Latest Update: June 2, 2014

Barred Owlet #14-0668 has been doing well in the Center’s C-pens and has been steadily gaining weight. On May 27, the veterinary staff rechecked the owlet’s bloodwork. An elevated white blood cell count suggested possible inflammation, however no wounds or injuries were found. The veterinary staff is not currently concerned and will recheck the owlet’s bloodwork in one week.

Great Horned Owlet #14-0255

On April 4, a Great Horned Owlet was found alone in a backyard in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The owlet was rescued by two permitted wildlife rehabilitators after it could not be successfully reunited with its parents. After four days in the rehabilitators’ care, the owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center on April 8 to be raised by the Center’s Great Horned Owl surrogate.

Latest Update: May 19, 2014

On April 28, Great Horned Owlet #14-0255 was joined by Great Horned Owlet #14-0404 in Flight Pen 4. Great Horned Owlet #14-0255 displayed no aggressive behaviors toward the new owlet and was observed later on roosting with its new “sibling” and Papa G’Ho.

On April 4, a Great Horned Owlet was found alone in a backyard in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The owlet was rescued by two permitted wildlife rehabilitators after it could not be successfully reunited with its parents. After four days in the rehabilitators’ care, the owlet was transferred to the Wildlife Center on April 8 to be raised by the Center’s Great Horned Owl surrogate.

Latest Update: April 24, 2014

On April 9, Great Horned Owlet #14-0255 spent the night in an airline crate in Flight Pen 4 with Papa G’Ho. The following day, the crate door was opened to allow the two owls to directly interact.

Papa and the owlet were initially monitored internally through the Center’s Critter Cams to ensure that the introduction went smoothly. The cameras were later broadcast live to the public, and Critter Cam viewers have enjoyed watching the two birds together during the past two weeks.

Great Horned Owlet #14-0404

On April 21, a Great Horned Owlet was found on the side of the road in Dare County, North Carolina with superficial abrasions on its toes. Since no parents were present, the orphaned owlet was taken to a veterinary clinic where it was given fluids and fed mice until it was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 27.

Latest Update: May 19, 2014

On April 28, Great Horned Owlet #14-0404 spent the night in an airline crate in Flight Pen 4 with Papa G’Ho and Great Horned Owlet #14-0255. The following day, the rehabilitation staff opened the crate door and allowed the young owl to interact with the other owls. Introductions were successful and Papa G’Ho readily accepted the new owlet.

Black Bear #14-0184

During the week of March 24, a thin yearling was seen hanging around a campground in Botetourt County. Due to the appearance of the bear, campground officials contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The bear was captured on March 27 and was transported to the Center on March 28.

Dr. Rich, the Center’s veterinary fellow, anesthetized the bear for a physical examination. Radiographs and blood work were also performed; no significant injuries were found. The female bear weighed 7.46 kg – she was thin, but not emaciated.

Latest Update: May 5, 2014

On the afternoon of May 5, Dr. Rich was able to successfully dart and capture Black Bear yearling #14-0184 from yard #2 in the Black Bear Complex. The yearling weighed in at 14.0 kg and was in good body condition.

During the week of March 24, a thin yearling was seen hanging around a campground in Botetourt County. Due to the appearance of the bear, campground officials contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The bear was captured on March 27 and was transported to the Center on March 28.

Dr. Rich, the Center’s veterinary fellow, anesthetized the bear for a physical examination. Radiographs and blood work were also performed; no significant injuries were found. The female bear weighed 7.46 kg – she was thin, but not emaciated.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

Black Bears #14-0142 and #14-0184 were caught up today for a weigh-in and blood draw. Both were very feisty and appeared to be in good body condition. Black Bear #14-0142 weighed in at 14.3 kg; Black Bear #14-0184 was 10.1 kg. Both yearlings were moved to yard #2 of the Black Bear Complex.

Black Bear cub #14-0394

On April 25, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub – the fifth of the year.

The male cub was confiscated and brought to the Center by the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Details surrounding the initial discovery of the cub are unclear. This is the third confiscated cub of the year that had been kept for a period of time by people.

Latest Update: May 2, 2014

Black Bear cubs #14-0224 and #14-0394 are eating well and have been learning to eat thickened formula from a bowl during the past week. On the last “weigh day”, cub #14-0224 weighed 2.93 kg; cub #14-0394 weighed 2.36 kg. The rehabilitation staff are cutting the three times-a-day feedings down to two feedings a day.

On April 25, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub – the fifth of the year.

The male cub was confiscated and brought to the Center by the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Details surrounding the initial discovery of the cub are unclear. This is the third confiscated cub of the year that had been kept for a period of time by people.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The introduction of Black Bear cubs #14-0224 and #14-0394 went well this weekend; both cubs are getting along and the staff are quite pleased that each of these cubs has a playmate its own size. Female Black Bear cub #14-0224 is finally getting the hang of bowl feeding, and is eating her thickened formula well. New cub #14-0394 is reluctant to eat out of a bowl, although after observing his new “sister” eating, he began to explore the bowl option.

Black Bear cub #14-0224

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: May 2, 2014

Black Bear cubs #14-0224 and #14-0394 are eating well and have been learning to eat thickened formula from a bowl during the past week. On the last “weigh day”, cub #14-0224 weighed 2.93 kg; cub #14-0394 weighed 2.36 kg. The rehabilitation staff are cutting the three times-a-day feedings down to two feedings a day.

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The introduction of Black Bear cubs #14-0224 and #14-0394 went well this weekend; both cubs are getting along and the staff are quite pleased that each of these cubs has a playmate its own size. Female Black Bear cub #14-0224 is finally getting the hang of bowl feeding, and is eating her thickened formula well. New cub #14-0394 is reluctant to eat out of a bowl, although after observing his new “sister” eating, he began to explore the bowl option.

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 18, 2014

Black Bear cub #14-0224 is doing well and currently weighs 2.16 kg. The rehabilitation staff are still working on transitioning the cub to a consistent bowl-feeding schedule – while the cub will lap a little bit of thickened formula out of a bowl, she hasn’t quite gotten the hang of it yet.

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

Bear cub #14-0224 experienced a small setback last week after she aspirated a small amount of formula. The cub was reluctant to eat for a couple of days, although the bear improved greatly after a course of antibiotics and oxygen therapy. The cub is currently eating well, and the staff rehabilitators are working hard to transition the young cub to drinking formula out of a bowl.

On April 3, rescuers found a small Black Bear cub in the middle of a gravel road in Giles County, Virginia.

Latest Update: April 8, 2014

Black Bear cub #14-0224 has settled in at the Wildlife Center and is taking her bottles well. The rehabilitation staff began feeding the cub four times a day last week; because feeding is going well, the bear was moved to a three time a day schedule today. The cub gained weight and now weighs 1.855 kg. 

Here is a video compilation of two feedings – wildlife rehabilitation intern Jordan feeds the cub in the first half of the video; certified wildlife rehabilitator Kelli feeds the cub in the second part.
 

Black Bear cubs #14-0252 and #14-0253

On April 7, the Wildlife Center admitted two Black Bear cubs. The cubs were found after their mother was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia.

Upon admission, Dr. Kristin Britton, diagnostic intern Kelli, and two veterinary externs examined the cubs. Cub 14-0252, a female, weighed in at 3.23 kg. Cub #14-0253, a male, weighed 4.68 kg. Both cubs were bright, alert, and healthy.

The cubs will likely be introduced to cub #14-0224 this week.

Latest Update: April 18, 2014

Let the introductions begin!

On April 7, the Wildlife Center admitted two Black Bear cubs. The cubs were found after their mother was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia.

Upon admission, Dr. Kristin Britton, diagnostic intern Kelli, and two veterinary externs examined the cubs. Cub 14-0252, a female, weighed in at 3.23 kg. Cub #14-0253, a male, weighed 4.68 kg. Both cubs were bright, alert, and healthy.

The cubs will likely be introduced to cub #14-0224 this week.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

Bear cubs #14-0252 and #14-0253 are bright and alert – and are definitely a handful! Since the cubs’ admissions, the rehabilitation staff has been feeding the two bears three times a day. While Kelli and Amber began bottle-feeding the cubs, both rehabilitators have been working hard during the past week to transition the cubs to lapping thickened formula from a bowl.

Black Bear #14-0126

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: April 16, 2014

With the arrival of the bear cubs of 2014, the Wildlife Center of Virginia staff and officials with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries decided to try to use a female bear yearling as a surrogate “big sister”. This technique was used by the Wildlife Center in 2012 and there have been several other instances at other bear rehabilitation facilities when cubs were fostered onto female yearlings.

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: April 4, 2014

We caught Black Bear #14-0126 attempting to get comfortable while napping in a tree yesterday ... and we managed to get a video clip of it!

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 21, 2014

On March 21, the Wildlife Center staff caught Black Bears #14-0126 and #14-0142 in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Both bears were given a quick physical examination and were weighed; both proved to be difficult to capture – they wanted nothing to do with people!

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 14, 2014

Black Bear yearling #14-0126 is moving well and has been very active in her enclosure. She has been observed climbing the trees and has been eating well. On March 12, the yearling was introduced to a new roommate -- Black Bear yearling #14-0142. Both bears appear comfortable with each other as well as their new enclosure. The Center’s staff will continue to monitor the bears’ behaviors and appetites.

 

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 10, 2014

During the weekend, Black Bear #14-0126’s heart rate remained lower than normal, although by March 9, the bear was brighter and more alert. Follow-up blood work indicated that the bear was slightly anemic, but no other abnormalities were noted. The bear is eating a regular bear meal and as of Sunday, had gained two kilograms (4.4 lbs) since admission.

The veterinary team decided to move the bear to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure on March 9. The team will continue to monitor the bear via webcam, and will perform additional blood work on March 17.
 

On March 1, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The small bear had been spotted in Madison County for several days, and was hanging around someone’s back porch. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to a call about the bear and was able to easily catch the underweight yearling. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and was admitted as patient #14-0126.

Latest Update: March 6, 2014

On March 5, Dr. Rich Sim noted that Black Bear #14-0126’s heart rate was low. The bear’s heart rate was measured at 66 beats per minute; a typical heart rate for a bear this age would be about 120-130 beats per minute.

Common Loon #14-1634

On July 14, a juvenile Common Loon was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found down next to a body of water in Rockbridge County. Normally at this time of year, loons are found in Canada and in neighboring United States and are typically not found this far south. Dr. Helen Ingraham, the Center’s veterinary fellow, performed the initial exam on the loon. During the exam, the loon was quiet and minimally responsive. Dr. Helen noted the bird was very thin, dehydrated, and had some broken primary feathers on the left wing.

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Black Bear cub #14-0350

On April 21, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub – the fourth cub admitted in 2014. The cub was found in Botetourt County, Virginia, on April 18. The cub’s rescuer found the bear crying in her yard after it was surrounded by dogs. On April 21, the rescuer took the cub to a permitted rehabilitator in Covington, Virginia, who immediately transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.