Current Patients

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: March 25, 2015

On March 24, the rehabilitation staff began exercising Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047. The owl did fairly well for its first day of exercise, especially after its recovery from both wing and eye injuries; the staff report that the bird flew a total of nine times perch-to-perch in the yard of the B-pens. The owl grounded several times, and needs to work on height and stamina, but daily exercise sessions will allow the owl to build flight muscles again.

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047 has been healing well since its eye evisceration surgery. The incision site is healing well and the owl is readily eating on its own. The veterinary team continued physical therapy on the owl’s injured wing every three days, and on February 19, took follow-up radiographs. Dr. Meghan noted that the owl’s scapular fracture has healed well and the bird will soon be ready to move outside.

Merlin #15-0151

On March 9, a juvenile Merlin was found unable to fly in Roanoke County, Virginia. The bird was brought to Wildlife Care Alliance rehabilitator in Radford, Virginia; the bird was given fluids, anti-inflammatories, and its wing was bandaged, due to a suspected right ulnar fracture and carpel luxation [dislocated wrist]. On March 11, the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: March 24, 2015

Merlin #15-0151 has remained bright, alert, and very feisty during the past week and is eating well. On March 20, the veterinary staff rechecked radiographs, which revealed a small callus forming at the fracture site indicating that the fracture was healing. Dr. Meghan noticed that there was some moderate contracture of the right patagium [the leading edge of a bird's wing between the shoulder and the wrist] during the bird’s physical therapy session.

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: March 17, 2015

During the winter months, Barred Owlet #14-1179 remained housed with Mama BADO. Throughout the winter, only paid staff entered the bird’s flight pen to feed, clean, and perform feet and feather checks on both birds.

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: March 16, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 has been continuing to improve during the past two weeks, although the bird went through a period of inconsistent eating earlier this month. The rehabilitation staff acclimated the hawk to the outdoor temperatures for several days last weekend, and on March 10 moved the hawk to an outdoor enclosure. The hawk was first moved to an enclosure in the Center's C-pens; these enclosures provide space for patients to move and hop to several different perches, but limit the overall activity of birds that should not yet be in a large flight pen.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: March 4, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to slowly recover from lead poisoning. The hawk is now consistently breathing without increased effort and has moved out of the Center’s critical care chamber into a regular crate in the holding room. The hawk has received two rounds of treatment for the blood parasite that was found in February; another blood analysis will be performed in early March to see if treatment needed to be continued. The bird hasn’t been eating on her own for the past few nights, but readily eats when tease-fed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to surprise the staff with her progress and improvements. The bird is perching well and eating whole food, and the veterinary team has also noted that the bird’s harsh lung sounds have slowly improved. While the hawk still occasionally breathes hard during treatments, the staff have been able to wean her off of supplemental oxygen while being handled. The bird continues to receive oxygen therapy in the Center’s critical care chamber, but Dr. Meghan and Dr.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 10, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to recover from lead poisoning. Last week, Critter Cam viewers were able to watch the treatment of this hawk on the debut of “Hospital Cam”; viewers watched as Dr. Helen removed the ball bandages from the hawk’s feet and tested the bird’s digits for a deep pain response. The hawk currently has a deep pain response in all but one toe. That day, Dr. Helen decided to leave the hawk’s bandages off to see how the bird moved in her crate. The staff were all pleased to see that the hawk was able to perch on her own.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 3, 2015

During the week of January 26, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 developed respiratory issues; when the bird was removed for daily treatments, she would begin struggling for breath after just a few seconds of being handled. Dr. Meghan suspects this could be an issue secondary to the lead toxicity, and could also be due to the hawk’s limited movement and inability to stand. A course of anti-fungal medication was prescribed. Treatment continued, though the veterinary staff were growing concerned over the lack of improvement.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 23, 2015

The veterinary team began another round of chelation therapy on Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 on January 21; after this five-day course of treatment is over, another in-house lead test will be performed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Over the weekend, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 remained bright and alert, although still unable to stand. The hawk’s feet have remained clenched since admission and while the veterinary team performs physical therapy on the bird every day, the vets also decided to place ball bandages on the hawk’s feet. This allows the bird to keep her feet in a somewhat normal position and prevents a self-inflicted talon injury.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001

On January 1 [at approximately 3:30 p.m.], the Wildlife Center admitted the first patient of 2015.

An infant, eyes-closed Eastern Gray Squirrel was found on December 25 in Chesterfield County. The orphaned, female squirrel was brought to local wildlife rehabilitator Angela Sievert for immediate care and was transported to the Center on January 1.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 arrived in good condition and was placed with another young Eastern Gray Squirrel of the same age that was admitted in mid-December.

Latest Update: February 5, 2015

On January 22, Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 and her sibling began acclimating to the outdoors. During the acclimation process, which lasted seven days, the two squirrels’ portable enclosure was placed outside so that the squirrels would gradually become accustomed to the outdoor temperatures, sounds, and other stimuli. At the end of each day, the two squirrels were moved into the Center’s heated acclimation shed to spend the night.

On January 1 [at approximately 3:30 p.m.], the Wildlife Center admitted the first patient of 2015.

An infant, eyes-closed Eastern Gray Squirrel was found on December 25 in Chesterfield County. The orphaned, female squirrel was brought to local wildlife rehabilitator Angela Sievert for immediate care and was transported to the Center on January 1.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 arrived in good condition and was placed with another young Eastern Gray Squirrel of the same age that was admitted in mid-December.

Latest Update: January 12, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary staff noticed Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 sounded congested and was making slight crackling sounds when breathing. Suspecting a possible infection, the infant squirrel was given a course of antibiotics for five days.

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326

On November 1, a homeowner in Lynchburg found an adult Eastern Box Turtle in her yard – its carapace [upper shell] was entirely painted with pink latex paint! The turtle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and was transferred to the Wildlife Center on November 15.

Latest Update: January 8, 2015

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326 has been doing well so far this winter. After just two weeks of scrubbing, the turtle began looking more like herself; fortunately the latex paint was easy to remove. By mid-December, the daily scrubs and baths were no longer needed.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalities in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.