Current Patients

Bald Eagle #14-2150

On September 17, a male adult Bald Eagle was found face down in a field in Accomack County, Virginia. The rescuer brought the bird to local wildlife rehabilitator Gay Frazee later that day. When Gay examined the eagle, he was dull, minimally responsive, and lying down. The bird was given fluids twice that evening and the following morning, the bird was much brighter and able to stand.

Latest Update: October 23, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-2150 was released today at Kiptopeke State Park in front of a crowd of about 60 people. It was very windy on the Eastern Shore, but when president Ed Clark tossed the eagle into the air, the bird flew away, banked left, and soared off over the tree line out of sight.

Photos courtesy of Ron Wrucke:

On September 17, a male adult Bald Eagle was found face down in a field in Accomack County, Virginia. The rescuer brought the bird to local wildlife rehabilitator Gay Frazee later that day. When Gay examined the eagle, he was dull, minimally responsive, and lying down. The bird was given fluids twice that evening and the following morning, the bird was much brighter and able to stand.

Latest Update: October 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-2150 has been flying well during the past two weeks. The eagle is able to consistently fly the length of the flight pen an average of 16 times, and has strong flights and good stamina. On Sunday, October 19, the veterinary staff drew blood from the eagle for pre-release diagnostics. Results came back within normal limits, and the eagle was cleared for release.

On September 17, a male adult Bald Eagle was found face down in a field in Accomack County, Virginia. The rescuer brought the bird to local wildlife rehabilitator Gay Frazee later that day. When Gay examined the eagle, he was dull, minimally responsive, and lying down. The bird was given fluids twice that evening and the following morning, the bird was much brighter and able to stand.

Latest Update: October 6, 2014

On October 1, Bald Eagle #14-2150 was moved the A1 enclosure to begin flight conditioning. On the first day of exercise, the bird was uncoordinated, but was able to maintain good height and completed six passes from end to end. The following day, the Bald Eagle grounded once during the session, but was able to quickly fly up to his perches and complete 12 passes.

On September 17, a male adult Bald Eagle was found face down in a field in Accomack County, Virginia. The rescuer brought the bird to local wildlife rehabilitator Gay Frazee later that day. When Gay examined the eagle, he was dull, minimally responsive, and lying down. The bird was given fluids twice that evening and the following morning, the bird was much brighter and able to stand.

Latest Update: October 1, 2014

During the weekend, it was difficult to tell if Bald Eagle #14-2150 was eating – some food was disappearing in the A3 enclosure, but most food was untouched, and the staff were unsure as to which eagle (#14-1450 or roommate #14-1955) was eating. A variety of food is being offered – chopped rat, whole rat, and fish.

On September 30, Critter Cam viewers were tasked with monitoring the eagles' eating habits – and viewers noted that both birds were interested in the plate of chopped rat. Both birds ate some of the food.

On September 17, a male adult Bald Eagle was found face down in a field in Accomack County, Virginia. The rescuer brought the bird to local wildlife rehabilitator Gay Frazee later that day. When Gay examined the eagle, he was dull, minimally responsive, and lying down. The bird was given fluids twice that evening and the following morning, the bird was much brighter and able to stand.

Latest Update: September 26, 2014

Since admission, Bald Eagle #14-2150 has remained bright and alert, but has not eaten on his own. After giving the eagle a wide variety of food for a few days, the veterinary team began force-feeding the eagle to ensure he is consuming enough calories. The eagle was moved to a C-pen enclosure on September 24, but the bird still refused to eat on its own.

American Bittern #14-2257

On October 15, a woman in Montgomery County saw a bird “blown out of the sky” and watched as it fell to the ground. The rescuer was able to capture the bird and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center. Rehabilitator Sabrina Garvin examined the bird – which was an American Bittern, a medium-sized stocky heron. The bittern was transported to the Wildlife Center on October 16.

Latest Update: October 21, 2014

On Friday, the rehabilitation staff were pleased to note that American Bittern #14-2257 was eating all of the live fish in its temporary “wetlands” in the Center’s aviary. The bittern was perching and hiding, and appeared to be behaving normally for a bittern. The staff increased the number of live fish provided to the bittern – on Saturday, the bird ate 119 fish!

Merlin #14-2254

On October 16, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted a not-commonly seen patient -- a juvenile Merlin. Merlins are small, compact North American falcons that typically prey on smaller birds and are quick, agile flyers. During this time of year, Merlins migrate to the lower southeastern and southwestern United States and will winter as far south as Ecuador.

Latest Update: October 21, 2014

Merlin #14-2254 went into respiratory distress on the morning of October 18 after it was removed from its enclosure for treatment and additional blood work. Dr. Meghan provided oxygen to the Merlin, and intubated the bird to facilitate its breathing, but the condition of the Merlin quickly declined.

Despite additional medication and efforts to revive the Merlin, the bird died. Blood work analysis revealed that the total protein levels in the blood had decreased even more since admission, likely due to the initial trauma of being hit by a vehicle.
 

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: October 16, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 continues to do very well with her training. Amanda and Raina are working with the falcon daily, although the bird now spends a significant amount of time in her outdoor enclosure. She still readily flies to the glove when Amanda or Raina ask her to.

While work with the bird will continue over the next few weeks, both Amanda and Raina agree that this has been an amazingly fast training and assessment period for the falcon. With achievements made to date, it's time to declare the Peregrine Falcon as the newest official member of the Outreach Team. 

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: October 8, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 is doing very well with her training to be an education ambassador. Both Amanda and Raina continue to work with the bird every day; the Peregrine Falcon still spends time on the glove with both of her handlers, but also has started spending time in her new enclosure. The falcon appears to be relaxed with Raina and Amanda, steps up on the glove willingly when removed from her crate, and also readily flies about three or four feet to the glove from perches in her enclosure.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 is doing very well with her training to become an education ambassador. 

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: September 16, 2014

During the week of September 8, Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 finished the course of antibiotics for her eye injury. 

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: August 26, 2014

On August 25, Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 was fitted with her education “equipment” – the leather anklets and jesses that are used for training and handling education raptors. 

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 30, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 is recovering well from her eye evisceration surgery. The surgical site is healing well, and the falcon has been seen “head-bobbing” – moving her head up and down to judge depth perception and distance as she gets used to life with one eye.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 23, 2014

On the afternoon of July 22, veterinary intern Dr. Meghan Feeney took Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 to surgery to remove the bird’s left eye. Dr. Dave McRuer, the Center’s veterinary director, was present to assist.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 21, 2014

During the past week, Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 received several more eye assessments. Dr. Dave McRuer, the Center’s veterinary director, noted that additional scar tissue was visible in the falcon’s injured eye on Thursday, July 17; on Saturday, Dr. Meghan Feeney, the Center’s veterinary intern, noted additional changes in the eye. On Monday, July 21, the falcon’s eye had visibly changed; the eye was atrophied and the falcon seemed to be reacting more to light [possibly indicating pain].

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: July 9, 2014

Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 continues to eat well and gain weight at the Wildlife Center. On July 7, Dr. Rich re-examined the falcon’s injured left eye. Last week, there was a large blood clot present in the bird’s eye, which prevented a full evaluation of all of the structures in the back of the eye. This week, the clot has developed into a band of connective tissue in the middle portion of the bird’s eye. With so much damage sustained to the eye, the Peregrine Falcon has been deemed non-releasable.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: June 30, 2014

Dr. Rich examined the injured eye of Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 again this morning. He found that while the blood in the front portion of the eye has cleared, there is still a large blood clot in the middle part of the bird’s eye.

On June 19, the Wildlife Center received a call about one of the two female falcons hatched on cam in downtown Richmond on May 1, 2014. On June 17, the two birds fledged from their roost; volunteers with “FledgeWatch” looked on as the birds took their first flights. Two days after fledging from the nest, one of the birds flew into a building in downtown Richmond, damaging her left eye and beak.

Latest Update: June 23, 2014

Dr. Rich re-checked the injured eye of Peregrine Falcon #14-1319 on the morning of June 23.

Eastern Screech-Owls of 2014

On May 19, the Wildlife Center began admitting Eastern Screech-Owlets from throughout Virginia. Many of these young owls were suspected to be orphans, while others were brought to the Center after their nests were destroyed. 

Latest Update: October 16, 2014

The last two of the 2014 Eastern Screech-Owlets have been released! Earlier this month, young owls #14-0913 and #14-1240 passed live prey training and were cleared for release. Owl #14-0913 was returned to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for release in Catawba. SVWC shared these photos:

Upon admission:                                                                              Prior to release:

On May 19, the Wildlife Center began admitting Eastern Screech-Owlets from throughout Virginia. Many of these young owls were suspected to be orphans, while others were brought to the Center after their nests were destroyed. 

Latest Update: September 2, 2014

The Eastern Screech-Owls of 2014 have continued to grow and develop during the past month. In late July and early August, Eastern Screech-Owls #14-0774, #14-0913, #14-0914, #14-0993, #14-1178, and #14-1240 began individual flight conditioning.  

On May 19, the Wildlife Center began admitting Eastern Screech-Owlets from throughout Virginia. Many of these young owls were suspected to be orphans, while others were brought to the Center after their nests were destroyed. 

Latest Update: July 30, 2014

All of the five Eastern Screech-Owls of 2014 in B7 enclosure have grown in their flight feathers and have lost all of their “baby” down feathers. At this point in their development in the wild, young Eastern Screech-Owls are developing their flying and hunting skills and becoming more independent from their parents. Because the owlets are at the age where they are less dependent on their parents, wildlife rehabilitator Amber Dedrick decided to spilt up most of the Eastern Screech-Owls in the B7 enclosure into smaller groups to prepare for flight conditioning.

On May 19, the Wildlife Center began admitting Eastern Screech-Owlets from throughout Virginia. Many of these young owls were suspected to be orphans, while others were brought to the Center after their nests were destroyed. 

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

The Eastern Screech-Owlets of 2014 have been doing well and have been observed practicing their flying abilities. On June 23, Eastern Screech-Owlet #14-1387 was referred to the Wildlife Center as a healthy orphan from Rockfish Wildlife Sanctuary in Charlottesville, Virginia. After an initial exam, the owl joined the three owls [#14-1178, #14-1268, and #14-0082] in B6. Presently there are nine Eastern Screech-Owlets in the Center’s B-Pens.

Common Raven #14-1100

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: October 14, 2014

Raven patient #14-1100 is doing very well after having several feathers imped in September. The bird lost two of the feathers that were imped last month, but she is flying well.

On October 13, the rehabilitation staff moved the raven to a larger flight pen [A3] for conditioning prior to release. The raven will stream live on the Center's Critter Cams -- this is the first passerine patient to be featured on the Critter Cam!

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: September 30, 2014

Raven #14-1100 has been doing well this past month. She has been housed in one of the Center’s outdoor C-pens while the staff monitored her feather growth.

To keep her engaged, the Raven has received enrichment almost daily. Enrichment includes unique food items or food delivery (e.g., food stuffed inside a rubber dog toy), changing the perches in her enclosure, or placing different substrates in trays on the enclosure floor (e.g., dead leaves and rocks in an aluminum tray). Rehabilitation intern Jordan recalls putting “cricket ice cubes” in the bird’s water dish.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: August 25, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been doing well during the last month. The raven’s feathers are growing in, and the bird is full of energy.

On August 16, the rehabilitation staff moved the raven from the C-pen enclosure to a smaller aviary enclosure to make room for other patients that needed the space.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been doing well in her outdoor enclosure. The staff continues to monitor her feather growth and appetite. The bird is bright and active, and she maneuvers well on the “jungle gym” of perches set up in her enclosure.

To keep this patient entertained, the rehabilitation staff has given the bird plenty of enrichment items, including rotting logs and fruit stuffed with mice.

Bald Eagle #14-1955

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 14, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying very well during the past two weeks of flight conditioning. The eagle typically flies 15-20 times the length of the flight enclosure and has good strength, stamina, and altitude.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 2, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying well in flight pen A3 during the past week. The rehabilitation staff are exercising the bird daily, and the eagle is flying the length of the enclosure about eight to ten times consistently.

Great Horned Owlet #14-1735

On the evening of July 24, a Great Horned Owlet was found on the ground covered in flies in Albemarle County. With no sign of the owlet’s parents, the young owl was brought to the Center the following day. During the initial exam, Great Horned Owlet #14-1735 was dull and was covered in lice and flat flies. Radiographs were taken and an emergency blood panel was performed. Radiographs were unremarkable, but the emergency panel revealed that the bird was anemic -- likely due to the severe external parasite infestation.

Latest Update: October 10, 2014

Papa G’Ho’s kids are growing up! Great Horned Owlets #14-0404 and 14-0255 both passed mouse school earlier this week and were cleared for release. Both owls were banded, and will be returned to their original nest areas for release this weekend.

Owlets #14-1735 and 14-1746 have been split up into Flight Pens 5 and 6, respectively. The owls are being exercised individually; both are flying well.

On the evening of July 24, a Great Horned Owlet was found on the ground covered in flies in Albemarle County. With no sign of the owlet’s parents, the young owl was brought to the Center the following day. During the initial exam, Great Horned Owlet #14-1735 was dull and was covered in lice and flat flies. Radiographs were taken and an emergency blood panel was performed. Radiographs were unremarkable, but the emergency panel revealed that the bird was anemic -- likely due to the severe external parasite infestation.

Latest Update: August 22, 2014

On August 15, the rehabilitation staff opened the door of the airline crate and allowed Great Horned Owlet #14-1735 and Papa G’Ho to directly interact. Papa quickly accepted the new owlet.

Great Horned Owlet #14-1746

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: October 10, 2014

Papa G’Ho’s kids are growing up! Great Horned Owlets #14-0404 and 14-0255 both passed mouse school earlier this week and were cleared for release. Both owls were banded, and will be returned to their original nest areas for release this weekend.

Owlets #14-1735 and 14-1746 have been split up into Flight Pens 5 and 6, respectively. The owls are being exercised individually; both are flying well.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: August 22, 2014

On August 15, the rehabilitation staff opened the door of the airline crate and allowed Great Horned Owlet #14-1735 and Papa G’Ho to directly interact. Papa quickly accepted the new owlet.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: August 15, 2014

Great Horned Owlets #14-0255 and #14-0404 are becoming more and more independent from their Great Horned Owl surrogate Papa G’Ho. At this point in their development, young owls begin to start taking interest in live prey, but are not hunting and catching larger prey on their own. To replicate this natural behavior and to provide practice opportunities for the young owls, the rehabilitation staff placed a large tub with live mice inside the owls’ flight pen. The owlets quickly took notice of the change in their environment and were very curious about the live mice.

Barred Owlet #14-0668

On May 13, the owlet was admitted to the Center as patient #14-0668. The bird was bright and feisty, well-hydrated, and showed no signs of injury from falling out of its nesting tree. The owl made appropriate warning noises with its beak [a clacking noise] when the veterinary staff approached the bird’s cage.

Latest Update: October 3, 2014

Barred Owl #14-0668 passed five nights of live prey training – proving that it could successfully hunt its own food. The young owl has been flying beautifully, and silently, for several weeks. On Thursday, October 2, the owl was caught up for pre-release blood work and banding. Blood work came back within normal limits, and the owl was approved for release.

On Friday, October 3, the owl was transported back to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center, who initially cared for the young owl after it was found in May. SVWC will release the bird near its original location.

On May 13, the owlet was admitted to the Center as patient #14-0668. The bird was bright and feisty, well-hydrated, and showed no signs of injury from falling out of its nesting tree. The owl made appropriate warning noises with its beak [a clacking noise] when the veterinary staff approached the bird’s cage.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.

On May 13, the owlet was admitted to the Center as patient #14-0668. The bird was bright and feisty, well-hydrated, and showed no signs of injury from falling out of its nesting tree. The owl made appropriate warning noises with its beak [a clacking noise] when the veterinary staff approached the bird’s cage.

Latest Update: June 2, 2014

Barred Owlet #14-0668 has been doing well in the Center’s C-pens and has been steadily gaining weight. On May 27, the veterinary staff rechecked the owlet’s bloodwork. An elevated white blood cell count suggested possible inflammation, however no wounds or injuries were found. The veterinary staff is not currently concerned and will recheck the owlet’s bloodwork in one week.

White-tailed Deer Fawns 2014

      

The Wildlife Center is currently caring for 11 White-tailed Deer fawns. The first fawn of 2014 was admitted on May 24 – historically, this is around the time that “fawn season” begins at the Center each year.

Latest Update: October 2, 2014

The 2014 fawn release was a success! On the morning of October 2, a group of 21 people [Center staff, students, and volunteers] prepared for the capture and release of the nine White-tailed Deer fawns during “fawn round-up”.

      

The Wildlife Center is currently caring for 11 White-tailed Deer fawns. The first fawn of 2014 was admitted on May 24 – historically, this is around the time that “fawn season” begins at the Center each year.

Latest Update: September 12, 2014

On September 7, the White-tailed Deer fawns at the Center were weaned to once-daily bottle feedings and are now offered primarily browse; as of September 14, they will no longer receive a daily bottle and will be fed only browse.

During the next two weeks, the fawns will transition into their new browse-only diet and the rehabilitation staff will monitor their adjustment. If the fawns remain healthy and continue to eat well, the planned release date is October 2.

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 1, 2014

On September 29, Bald Eagle #14-0261 had an additional series of radiographs taken to monitor the healing progress of the bird’s left wing. Radigraphs showed improvement; there is less inflammation of the bird’s left carpus [wrist].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: September 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 remained in her C-pen throughout most of August while several other young eagles were conditioned for release in the large flight pens. Every two weeks, the veterinary staff rechecked the eagle’s bloodwork and performed feet and feather checks. Bloodwork returned on July 26 was within normal limits.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 has continued to have trouble gaining height while flying. The eagle exercises an average of eight times perch-to-perch in her enclosure, but isn’t flying well enough for release. On July 21, routine blood work revealed a low white blood cell count, which could indicate an underlying infection.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 has been flying well in its large outdoor enclosure. The eagle’s right wing droop was noted inconsistently into mid-June, but was apparently not affecting the bird’s ability to fly the length of the enclosure.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 21, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was seen perching in its enclosure displaying an intermittent right wing droop that was not present on intake. The veterinary team also noticed that Bald Eagle #14-0261 had been continuously chewing on both of the protective carpal bumpers that had been placed on its wings. While the droop does not seem to be affecting the bird’s ability to fly, it is suspected to be the result of mild discomfort caused by the carpal bumpers.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was re-radiographed on May 20 to check on the healing progress of the bird’s fractured wing tip. Dr. Rich found that the fractured minor metacarpal was completely healed. He also noted a small bone spur on the tip of the eagle’s wing [noted with the red arrow below]; this could be due to a ligament injury that occurred with the fracture. Dr. Rich does not anticipate that this will affect the eagle’s flight; the injury will be re-checked on radiographs in one month.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

On May 7, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was caught up for anesthesia and radiographs. Dr. Rich was pleased to see the eagle’s fracture had a stable callous over the fracture site; however, the fracture still needs additional time to fully heal. Dr. Rich removed the eagle’s wing wrap, and placed it back in the C-pen. The bird will remain on cage rest for the next two weeks. 

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The veterinary team has continued to monitor Bald Eagle #14-0261 during the last few weeks. Each day, the staff visually checks to ensure that the bandage on the Bald Eagle’s wing is clean and intact.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Bald Eagle #14-2147

On September 17, a juvenile Bald Eagle [likely 2.5 years old] was found down on the ground at a landfill in King George County. The bird was unable to stand. The eagle was captured and taken to Wildbunch Wildlife Refuge for stabilization; the following day, a transporter drove the Bald Eagle to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: September 26, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-2147 has been eating well during her week of cage-rest. On Thursday, September 25, Dr. Meghan re-radiographed the eagle to check on the bird’s shoulder injury. Dr. Meghan reports that the shoulder injury is improving – there is less inflammation.

The eagle was moved to a C-pen enclosure for further rest and observation. Additional radiographs will be taken in two weeks.
 

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anethetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalties in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.