Current Patients

Black Vulture #14-2238

On October 7, 2014, a juvenile Black Vulture was observed limping in a yard in Nelson County, Virginia. The following day, the property owner noticed the bird was still on the ground and did not fly away when it was approached. The young vulture was easily captured and transported to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 25, 2015

On February 22, Wildlife Center rehabilitator Leighann Cline, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring, and several rehabilitation externs released the Black Vulture in Nelson County at Rockfish Gap.

On October 7, 2014, a juvenile Black Vulture was observed limping in a yard in Nelson County, Virginia. The following day, the property owner noticed the bird was still on the ground and did not fly away when it was approached. The young vulture was easily captured and transported to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 19, 2015

Black Vulture #14-2238 has been flying well during the past week and quickly reached optimal flying level. On February 16, blood was drawn for a pre-release blood panel. The blood work was unremarkable and the Black Vulture was cleared for release. The bird’s rescuer will pick up the bird on Monday, February 23 and transport it back to Nelson County, Virginia for release. 

Bald Eagle #14-2406

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 24, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-2406 was released today at Chippokes Plantation State Park in Surry County, Virginia. A crowd of about 40 people gathered to watch and celebrate as the eagle returned to the wild; rehabilitators Dana and Linda were in attendance to assist Ed Clark with the release and to provide updates. Linda noted that after Ed tossed the bird into the air, the eagle flew off through the trees for quite a distance before he landed in a tree to rest.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 18, 2015

Bald Eagle #14-2406 has been flying well during the past week; the eagle's flights are strong and the bird has been consistently flying about 15-17 passes in the A1 flight pen. On Monday, February 16, the veterinary staff drew blood for pre-release analysis. Results came back within normal limits, and Dr. Helen declared the bird ready for release.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 9, 2015

Bald Eagle #14-2406 has been flying well during the last few weeks and has greatly improved his stamina. On February 5, the bird reached optimal conditioning level -- 15 passes in the flight enclosure, end-to-end. If the bird continues to fly 15 or more passes consistently during the next week of exercise, the staff will evaluate the bird for release. 

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 20, 2015

Bald Eagle #14-2406 did well during his first full week of exercise. The eagle is currently flying an average of 10 times perch-to-perch in the A1 flight pen; the staff and students note that the bird has good height during flight, but needs more stamina.

Exercise will continue during the next couple of weeks. Once the eagle's stamina is improved and the bird is able to make more passes in the flight enclosure, release will be considered.
 

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 8, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #14-2406 has had a strong appetite and his puncture wounds are healing appropriately.

The eagle was observed flying well in A2, and on January 5 the rehabilitation staff moved eagle #14-2406 to the adjacent flight pen [A1] so the bird could begin individual daily exercise.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 1, 2015

Since admission, the wounds on Bald Eagle #14-2406 have healed well, but the bird initially refused to eat on his own. After three nights of not eating, the veterinary team decided to move the eagle to an outdoor C-pen to see if a larger enclosure would encourage the bird to eat. On December 26, Bald Eagle #14-2406 moved to C4 and was offered a variety of foods that night—fish, rat, chick, and mice. The staff checked on the bird the following day and found that the eagle did eat the rat and chick overnight.

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to surprise the staff with her progress and improvements. The bird is perching well and eating whole food, and the veterinary team has also noted that the bird’s harsh lung sounds have slowly improved. While the hawk still occasionally breathes hard during treatments, the staff have been able to wean her off of supplemental oxygen while being handled. The bird continues to receive oxygen therapy in the Center’s critical care chamber, but Dr. Meghan and Dr.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 10, 2015

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 continues to recover from lead poisoning. Last week, Critter Cam viewers were able to watch the treatment of this hawk on the debut of “Hospital Cam”; viewers watched as Dr. Helen removed the ball bandages from the hawk’s feet and tested the bird’s digits for a deep pain response. The hawk currently has a deep pain response in all but one toe. That day, Dr. Helen decided to leave the hawk’s bandages off to see how the bird moved in her crate. The staff were all pleased to see that the hawk was able to perch on her own.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: February 3, 2015

During the week of January 26, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 developed respiratory issues; when the bird was removed for daily treatments, she would begin struggling for breath after just a few seconds of being handled. Dr. Meghan suspects this could be an issue secondary to the lead toxicity, and could also be due to the hawk’s limited movement and inability to stand. A course of anti-fungal medication was prescribed. Treatment continued, though the veterinary staff were growing concerned over the lack of improvement.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 23, 2015

The veterinary team began another round of chelation therapy on Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 on January 21; after this five-day course of treatment is over, another in-house lead test will be performed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Over the weekend, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 remained bright and alert, although still unable to stand. The hawk’s feet have remained clenched since admission and while the veterinary team performs physical therapy on the bird every day, the vets also decided to place ball bandages on the hawk’s feet. This allows the bird to keep her feet in a somewhat normal position and prevents a self-inflicted talon injury.

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047

On January 20, an adult Eastern Screech-owl was found after it was hit by a vehicle in Botetourt County. The bird was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who stabilized the bird and sent it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on January 22.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

Eastern Screech-Owl #15-0047 has been healing well since its eye evisceration surgery. The incision site is healing well and the owl is readily eating on its own. The veterinary team continued physical therapy on the owl’s injured wing every three days, and on February 19, took follow-up radiographs. Dr. Meghan noted that the owl’s scapular fracture has healed well and the bird will soon be ready to move outside.

Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2372

On November 30, 2014, an adult Eastern Screech-Owl was found on a road in Orange County, Virginia. The owl was unresponsive and easily captured by its rescuer.

On the evening of December 4, the owl was brought to the Wildlife Center and admitted as Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2372. During the initial exam, the owl was quiet, alert, and responsive, but had sustained significant trauma to its left eye. Pain medications were administered, and the owl was offered a meal of mice and placed in the Center’s holding room overnight.

Latest Update: February 20, 2015

On January 5, Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2372 was moved to an outdoor flight pen [B7]. For the next month, the owl’s behavior and healing progress was monitored by the rehabilitation and veterinary staff.

The owl continued to eat well, and the eye evisceration surgical site healed. However, because feathers had to be removed from around the eye to perform surgery, the owl is not be released until the weather is warmer.

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 9, 2015

On February 3, Drs. Dave, Kelli, and Helen exercised and assessed Bald Eagle #14-0261. The eagle has been on and off exercise since July 2014, with mixed results. The eagle can fly the length of the large flight enclosures many times during the course of an exercise session, however, at some point during the course of exercise, the eagle develops a wing droop. The eagle remains a heavy and flappy flier; the quality of her flight is not what is required of an eagle that can return to the wild.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 22, 2015

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 began exhibiting a left wing droop again after making about seven or eight flights in the A3 flight enclosure during daily exercise sessions. At times, the eagle’s flight is labored, while at other times the bird’s flight seems fine. This eagle has been very difficult to evaluate.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 5, 2015

In early December, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was given a two-week hiatus from cage exercise to allow her left wing droop to resolve.

On December 19, the rehabilitation staff began to exercise the eagle again; rehabilitation intern Jordan noted that the eagle had good stamina and no notable wing droop during the first day of exercise. The eagle made 15 passes from end-to-end in the A3 enclosure and was perching well.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: December 5, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was flying well in mid-November and on November 21, the bird was moved to flight pen A1 for additional exercise. Within a couple of days of the move, the staff noted that the eagle had a slight left wing droop and was not flying as well. During the next week, the staff carefully monitored the bird; on December 4, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 6, 2014

On October 24, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #14-0261 to flight pen A1 to be housed with Bald Eagle #14-1955. The staff hoped that a change of location would improve the eagle’s ability to fly.

Shortly after moving to the new enclosure, eagle #14-0261 began flying better, showing improved height and stamina.

The eagle has been exercised daily by Center staff and students. In the video below, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring exercises both eagles [Bald Eagles #14-0261 and #14-1955].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 1, 2014

On September 29, Bald Eagle #14-0261 had an additional series of radiographs taken to monitor the healing progress of the bird’s left wing. Radigraphs showed improvement; there is less inflammation of the bird’s left carpus [wrist].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: September 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 remained in her C-pen throughout most of August while several other young eagles were conditioned for release in the large flight pens. Every two weeks, the veterinary staff rechecked the eagle’s bloodwork and performed feet and feather checks. Bloodwork returned on July 26 was within normal limits.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 has continued to have trouble gaining height while flying. The eagle exercises an average of eight times perch-to-perch in her enclosure, but isn’t flying well enough for release. On July 21, routine blood work revealed a low white blood cell count, which could indicate an underlying infection.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 has been flying well in its large outdoor enclosure. The eagle’s right wing droop was noted inconsistently into mid-June, but was apparently not affecting the bird’s ability to fly the length of the enclosure.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 21, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was seen perching in its enclosure displaying an intermittent right wing droop that was not present on intake. The veterinary team also noticed that Bald Eagle #14-0261 had been continuously chewing on both of the protective carpal bumpers that had been placed on its wings. While the droop does not seem to be affecting the bird’s ability to fly, it is suspected to be the result of mild discomfort caused by the carpal bumpers.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was re-radiographed on May 20 to check on the healing progress of the bird’s fractured wing tip. Dr. Rich found that the fractured minor metacarpal was completely healed. He also noted a small bone spur on the tip of the eagle’s wing [noted with the red arrow below]; this could be due to a ligament injury that occurred with the fracture. Dr. Rich does not anticipate that this will affect the eagle’s flight; the injury will be re-checked on radiographs in one month.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

On May 7, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was caught up for anesthesia and radiographs. Dr. Rich was pleased to see the eagle’s fracture had a stable callous over the fracture site; however, the fracture still needs additional time to fully heal. Dr. Rich removed the eagle’s wing wrap, and placed it back in the C-pen. The bird will remain on cage rest for the next two weeks. 

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The veterinary team has continued to monitor Bald Eagle #14-0261 during the last few weeks. Each day, the staff visually checks to ensure that the bandage on the Bald Eagle’s wing is clean and intact.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001

On January 1 [at approximately 3:30 p.m.], the Wildlife Center admitted the first patient of 2015.

An infant, eyes-closed Eastern Gray Squirrel was found on December 25 in Chesterfield County. The orphaned, female squirrel was brought to local wildlife rehabilitator Angela Sievert for immediate care and was transported to the Center on January 1.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 arrived in good condition and was placed with another young Eastern Gray Squirrel of the same age that was admitted in mid-December.

Latest Update: February 5, 2015

On January 22, Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 and her sibling began acclimating to the outdoors. During the acclimation process, which lasted seven days, the two squirrels’ portable enclosure was placed outside so that the squirrels would gradually become accustomed to the outdoor temperatures, sounds, and other stimuli. At the end of each day, the two squirrels were moved into the Center’s heated acclimation shed to spend the night.

On January 1 [at approximately 3:30 p.m.], the Wildlife Center admitted the first patient of 2015.

An infant, eyes-closed Eastern Gray Squirrel was found on December 25 in Chesterfield County. The orphaned, female squirrel was brought to local wildlife rehabilitator Angela Sievert for immediate care and was transported to the Center on January 1.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 arrived in good condition and was placed with another young Eastern Gray Squirrel of the same age that was admitted in mid-December.

Latest Update: January 12, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary staff noticed Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 sounded congested and was making slight crackling sounds when breathing. Suspecting a possible infection, the infant squirrel was given a course of antibiotics for five days.

Bald Eagle #15-0059

On the morning of January 28, a homeowner in Stuarts Draft stopped by the Wildlife Center. He reported that a Bald Eagle was at his house and was behaving oddly. 

Latest Update: January 29, 2015

Dr. Meghan treated Bald Eagle #15-0059 late in the evening on January 28; the eagle was quiet but alert. On the morning of January 29, the veterinary team found the eagle deceased in its enclosure. The staff are disappointed, but not surprised, given the very high lead levels in the eagle’s blood.

Black Bear cubs #15-0049, #15-0050, and #15-0051

On January 22, a homeowner in Shenandoah County, Virginia, was outside cutting wood. He heard the cries of a young animal and went to investigate; he found three young Black Bear cubs on the ground between two trees. He left the cubs where they were and resumed cutting wood; when he checked on them later, the cubs were still there, and there was no sign of their mother. Snow was beginning to fall directly onto the cubs, so the homeowner took them into his house and called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

Latest Update: January 27, 2015

The DGIF biologists reported a successful fostering this afternoon! When the two biologists and one Department of Forestry official arrived at the den site, each of the three people zipped a cub into his or her jacket to keep them warm and snug on the hike to the den. After a couple of minutes, the cubs started crying – not an ideal way to sneak up on a denning sow. The three cubs were quickly placed back together in the jacket of one official, and the team of people continued the hike to the den.

On January 22, a homeowner in Shenandoah County, Virginia, was outside cutting wood. He heard the cries of a young animal and went to investigate; he found three young Black Bear cubs on the ground between two trees. He left the cubs where they were and resumed cutting wood; when he checked on them later, the cubs were still there, and there was no sign of their mother. Snow was beginning to fall directly onto the cubs, so the homeowner took them into his house and called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

Latest Update: January 27, 2015

The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries has located an active den with a confirmed sow (female) and cubs. On Tuesday, January 27, two DGIF biologists will pick up the cubs at the Center and will take them to the active den site for possible fostering.

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326

On November 1, a homeowner in Lynchburg found an adult Eastern Box Turtle in her yard – its carapace [upper shell] was entirely painted with pink latex paint! The turtle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and was transferred to the Wildlife Center on November 15.

Latest Update: January 8, 2015

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326 has been doing well so far this winter. After just two weeks of scrubbing, the turtle began looking more like herself; fortunately the latex paint was easy to remove. By mid-December, the daily scrubs and baths were no longer needed.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalities in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.