Current Patients

Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 23, 2015

The veterinary team began another round of chelation therapy on Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 on January 21; after this five-day course of treatment is over, another in-house lead test will be performed.

On January 10, a mature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Page County. The bird was easily captured and was taken to Fort Valley Wildlife Center before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the morning of January 13.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Over the weekend, Red-tailed Hawk #15-0021 remained bright and alert, although still unable to stand. The hawk’s feet have remained clenched since admission and while the veterinary team performs physical therapy on the bird every day, the vets also decided to place ball bandages on the hawk’s feet. This allows the bird to keep her feet in a somewhat normal position and prevents a self-inflicted talon injury.

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 22, 2015

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 began exhibiting a left wing droop again after making about seven or eight flights in the A3 flight enclosure during daily exercise sessions. At times, the eagle’s flight is labored, while at other times the bird’s flight seems fine. This eagle has been very difficult to evaluate.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 5, 2015

In early December, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was given a two-week hiatus from cage exercise to allow her left wing droop to resolve.

On December 19, the rehabilitation staff began to exercise the eagle again; rehabilitation intern Jordan noted that the eagle had good stamina and no notable wing droop during the first day of exercise. The eagle made 15 passes from end-to-end in the A3 enclosure and was perching well.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: December 5, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was flying well in mid-November and on November 21, the bird was moved to flight pen A1 for additional exercise. Within a couple of days of the move, the staff noted that the eagle had a slight left wing droop and was not flying as well. During the next week, the staff carefully monitored the bird; on December 4, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 6, 2014

On October 24, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #14-0261 to flight pen A1 to be housed with Bald Eagle #14-1955. The staff hoped that a change of location would improve the eagle’s ability to fly.

Shortly after moving to the new enclosure, eagle #14-0261 began flying better, showing improved height and stamina.

The eagle has been exercised daily by Center staff and students. In the video below, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring exercises both eagles [Bald Eagles #14-0261 and #14-1955].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 1, 2014

On September 29, Bald Eagle #14-0261 had an additional series of radiographs taken to monitor the healing progress of the bird’s left wing. Radigraphs showed improvement; there is less inflammation of the bird’s left carpus [wrist].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: September 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 remained in her C-pen throughout most of August while several other young eagles were conditioned for release in the large flight pens. Every two weeks, the veterinary staff rechecked the eagle’s bloodwork and performed feet and feather checks. Bloodwork returned on July 26 was within normal limits.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 has continued to have trouble gaining height while flying. The eagle exercises an average of eight times perch-to-perch in her enclosure, but isn’t flying well enough for release. On July 21, routine blood work revealed a low white blood cell count, which could indicate an underlying infection.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 has been flying well in its large outdoor enclosure. The eagle’s right wing droop was noted inconsistently into mid-June, but was apparently not affecting the bird’s ability to fly the length of the enclosure.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 21, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was seen perching in its enclosure displaying an intermittent right wing droop that was not present on intake. The veterinary team also noticed that Bald Eagle #14-0261 had been continuously chewing on both of the protective carpal bumpers that had been placed on its wings. While the droop does not seem to be affecting the bird’s ability to fly, it is suspected to be the result of mild discomfort caused by the carpal bumpers.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was re-radiographed on May 20 to check on the healing progress of the bird’s fractured wing tip. Dr. Rich found that the fractured minor metacarpal was completely healed. He also noted a small bone spur on the tip of the eagle’s wing [noted with the red arrow below]; this could be due to a ligament injury that occurred with the fracture. Dr. Rich does not anticipate that this will affect the eagle’s flight; the injury will be re-checked on radiographs in one month.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

On May 7, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was caught up for anesthesia and radiographs. Dr. Rich was pleased to see the eagle’s fracture had a stable callous over the fracture site; however, the fracture still needs additional time to fully heal. Dr. Rich removed the eagle’s wing wrap, and placed it back in the C-pen. The bird will remain on cage rest for the next two weeks. 

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The veterinary team has continued to monitor Bald Eagle #14-0261 during the last few weeks. Each day, the staff visually checks to ensure that the bandage on the Bald Eagle’s wing is clean and intact.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Bald Eagle #14-2406

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 20, 2015

Bald Eagle #14-2406 did well during his first full week of exercise. The eagle is currently flying an average of 10 times perch-to-perch in the A1 flight pen; the staff and students note that the bird has good height during flight, but needs more stamina.

Exercise will continue during the next couple of weeks. Once the eagle's stamina is improved and the bird is able to make more passes in the flight enclosure, release will be considered.
 

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 8, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #14-2406 has had a strong appetite and his puncture wounds are healing appropriately.

The eagle was observed flying well in A2, and on January 5 the rehabilitation staff moved eagle #14-2406 to the adjacent flight pen [A1] so the bird could begin individual daily exercise.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

On Saturday, December 20, a group of hunters found a Bald Eagle down in the woods in Surry County, Virginia. They called for help and stayed with the eagle; rehabilitator Dana Lusher responded to the scene to capture the bird. The eagle was taken to a local veterinarian for stabilization and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 1, 2015

Since admission, the wounds on Bald Eagle #14-2406 have healed well, but the bird initially refused to eat on his own. After three nights of not eating, the veterinary team decided to move the eagle to an outdoor C-pen to see if a larger enclosure would encourage the bird to eat. On December 26, Bald Eagle #14-2406 moved to C4 and was offered a variety of foods that night—fish, rat, chick, and mice. The staff checked on the bird the following day and found that the eagle did eat the rat and chick overnight.

Horned Grebes #15-0022, #15-0023, and #15-0024

The recent snowy weather in the Shenandoah Valley brought in a “water dance” of Horned Grebes; three Horned Grebes were admitted to the Wildlife Center on January 14.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Grebes #15-0024 and #15-0026 continued regular swimming throughout the weekend. Dr. Helen noted that the small wing injury on grebe #15-0024 was healing well, and she was happy to find that the bird was able to maintain waterproofing at the site of the injury. On January 18, both birds were cleared for release; they were transferred to wildlife rehabilitators Linda and Dana for release at an ice-free lake. Dana reported that, “They were very grateful to be free and both gave a quick dive immediately to get the people cooties off of them!”

The recent snowy weather in the Shenandoah Valley brought in a “water dance” of Horned Grebes; three Horned Grebes were admitted to the Wildlife Center on January 14.

Latest Update: January 16, 2015

On January 15, Dr. Kelli, intern Jordan, and several extern students attempted to release grebes #15-0022 and #15-0023 at Sherando Lake. Unfortunately, the lake was completely frozen; the grebes would not have been able to take off! The team returned to the Center with grebes in tow.

In the meantime, another Horned Grebe was admitted to the Wildlife Center; grebe #15-0026 was found down near Target in Waynesboro, which is where fellow grebe #15-0023 was found. This new grebe did not appear to have any injuries.

Great Horned Owl #14-2376

On December 2, wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher found an adult Great Horned Owl lying face-down on a residential road in Chesapeake, Virginia. The bird was unable stand upright. Dana easily captured the bird and provided supportive care until she was able to transport the owl to the Wildlife Center on December 7.

Latest Update: January 19, 2015

Great Horned Owl #14-2376 continues to do well during daily exercise sessions and has consistently reached the optimal level of exercise for a Great Horned Owl in a flight pen -- 15 passes end-to-end. On January 11, radiographs were taken to reassess the owl’s muscle atrophy. Radiographs revealed there was still slight muscle degeneration on the owl’s left side, but were otherwise unremarkable. The veterinary staff also noted that even though the bird was eating all of its meals, it was still thin. The vets decided to increase the bird’s meal from 90 grams to 120 grams.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001

On January 1 [at approximately 3:30 p.m.], the Wildlife Center admitted the first patient of 2015.

An infant, eyes-closed Eastern Gray Squirrel was found on December 25 in Chesterfield County. The orphaned, female squirrel was brought to local wildlife rehabilitator Angela Sievert for immediate care and was transported to the Center on January 1.

Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 arrived in good condition and was placed with another young Eastern Gray Squirrel of the same age that was admitted in mid-December.

Latest Update: January 12, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary staff noticed Eastern Gray Squirrel #15-0001 sounded congested and was making slight crackling sounds when breathing. Suspecting a possible infection, the infant squirrel was given a course of antibiotics for five days.

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326

On November 1, a homeowner in Lynchburg found an adult Eastern Box Turtle in her yard – its carapace [upper shell] was entirely painted with pink latex paint! The turtle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and was transferred to the Wildlife Center on November 15.

Latest Update: January 8, 2015

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326 has been doing well so far this winter. After just two weeks of scrubbing, the turtle began looking more like herself; fortunately the latex paint was easy to remove. By mid-December, the daily scrubs and baths were no longer needed.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: January 2, 2015

On January 2, the veterinary team decided to move Bald Eagle #14-2406 to flight pen A2. Because the bird is consistently eating and his wounds have healed well, the team wanted to observe the bird in a larger space.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalities in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Bald Eagle #14-1955

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 23, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 was successfully released today at Natural Chimneys Park in Mt. Solon, Virginia. A crowd of about 200 people attended the release. President Ed Clark greeted the release attendees and shared some information about the Wildlife Center, Bald Eagles, and this particular eagle’s rehabilitation story. Ed tossed the bird into the air, and the eagle flew around a bend and out of sight.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 19, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been cleared for release! Wildlife Center President Ed Clark will release the juvenile bird at Natural Chimneys Park in Mt. Solon, Virginia on Tuesday, December 23 at 11:00 a.m. The release is open to the public; please RSVP to ksluiter@wildlifecenter.org if you plan on attending.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 17, 2014

On Thursday, December 18, DGIF biologist Jeff Cooper will come to the Center to fit Bald Eagle #14-1955 with a GPS transmitter. The eagle will also be banded and pre-release blood work will be drawn for analysis.

If blood work is within normal limits, and the eagle continues to fly well the rest of this week, the bird will likely be released in the Shenandoah Valley next week [Christmas week].
 

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 continues to do well in flight pen A1. The bird is flying and maneuvering well and the vet staff are hoping that this bird will soon be ready for release.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 4, 2014

On November 21, Drs. Dave, Helen, and Meghan transported Bald Eagle #14-1955 to Virginia Tech for an examination by board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Phil Pickett. Dr. Pickett used both a direct and an indirect ophthalmoscope to visualize the eagle’s retina.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: November 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying very well during the past few weeks. Rehabilitation intern Jordan reports that the eagle flies an average of 19-20 times during each exercise session, and the bird has great stamina and height in the large A3 flight enclosure.

On Friday, November 21, Drs. Dave, Helen, and Meghan will take the Bald Eagle to Virginia Tech for an in-depth eye examination by board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Phillip Pickett. The results of the eye examination will help determine if this young eagle will be able to be released soon.
 

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: November 6, 2014

On October 24, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #14-0261 to flight pen A1 to be housed with Bald Eagle #14-1955. The staff hoped that a change of location would improve the eagle’s ability to fly.

Shortly after moving to the new enclosure, eagle #14-0261 began flying better, showing improved height and stamina.

The eagle has been exercised daily by Center staff and students. In the video below, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring exercises both eagles [Bald Eagles #14-0261 and #14-1955].

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 14, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying very well during the past two weeks of flight conditioning. The eagle typically flies 15-20 times the length of the flight enclosure and has good strength, stamina, and altitude.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 2, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying well in flight pen A3 during the past week. The rehabilitation staff are exercising the bird daily, and the eagle is flying the length of the enclosure about eight to ten times consistently.

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.

Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2372

On November 30, 2014, an adult Eastern Screech-Owl was found on a road in Orange County, Virginia. The owl was unresponsive and easily captured by its rescuer.

On the evening of December 4, the owl was brought to the Wildlife Center and admitted as Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2372. During the initial exam, the owl was quiet, alert, and responsive, but had sustained significant trauma to its left eye. Pain medications were administered, and the owl was offered a meal of mice and placed in the Center’s holding room overnight.