Current Patients

Black Bear cub #16-2441

On November 15, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a car in Warren County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the sow's cub hanging around the area during the day and called animal control officials for help. The bear was able to be captured and admitted to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: December 1, 2016

The veterinary team have been monitoring Black Bear cub #16-2441 in the days following his admission; the bear did not have any signs of respiratory distress, despite the abnormal lung radiographs on admission. On November 25, the cub was darted and sedated for additional radiographs; Dr. Peach noted that the lung pattern on the radiograph actually appeared slightly worse than it did on admission. Dr. Peach explained that lung issues typically resolve more slowly and will continue to heal after the full course of antibiotics is given.

Black Bear #16-2409

On November 8, a Black Bear yearling was seen by the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologist was able to capture the young bear and transported it to the Wildlife Center the following morning.

Latest Update: December 1, 2016

During the past two weeks, the veterinarians have darted and anesthetized Black Bear yearling #16-2409 every five days so that they could manage the bear's deep leg wound. Dr. Ernesto was pleased with the healing progress of the wound and was pleasantly surprised on December 1 when he examined the bear's leg again. At this point, the wound has healed well and only a small superficial injury remains; Dr. Ernesto feels that the yearling will continue to heal well in the Center's Bear Complex. The bear has gained weight since admission but is still very thin.

On November 8, a Black Bear yearling was seen by the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. A Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologist was able to capture the young bear and transported it to the Wildlife Center the following morning.

Latest Update: November 23, 2016

Black Bear yearling #16-2409 has been doing well in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. It's always a challenge to keep a bandage on a rambunctious bear patient, but the yearling's e-collar has been working to prevent the bear from disturbing the bandage.

Bald Eagle #16-2377

On October 31, Bald Eagle #16-2377 was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found unable to fly in a residential area of Stafford County. During the initial exam, the eagle was bright, alert, and responsive, but was found to have a variety of physical injuries.

Latest Update: December 1, 2016

After approximately one month of treatment at the Wildlife Center, Bald Eagle #16-2377 has continued to show signs of a steady recovery. On November 16, the eagle was moved to outdoor enclosure C6. Nine days later, it was transferred to outdoor raptor enclosure A3 along with Bald Eagle #16-2402.

On October 31, Bald Eagle #16-2377 was admitted to the Wildlife Center after it was found unable to fly in a residential area of Stafford County. During the initial exam, the eagle was bright, alert, and responsive, but was found to have a variety of physical injuries.

Latest Update: November 17, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-2377 has been slowly improving during the past few weeks. As with all raptors admitted with lead toxicity, bloodwork has been performed every five days while the eagle has remained indoors. As with all raptors admitted with lead toxicity, blood tests are carefully monitored.

Bald Eagle #16-2402

On November 5, a private citizen of Suffolk, Virginia witnessed Bald Eagle #16-2402 fail to maintain altitude while flying and watched as the bird crash-landed into a nearby marsh, where it was unable to fly away. A certified wildlife rehabilitator retrieved the eagle, which was then presented to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following day.

Latest Update: December 1, 2016

After spending ten days in a separated loft within outdoor enclosure A3, Bald Eagle #16-2402 was shifted to the larger, full-sized section of the raptor flight-pen along with Bald Eagle #16-2377. The eagle began flight exercises on November 29 and is reportedly performing well during the initial sessions, completing a full six passes on November 30.  

Golden Eagle #16-1934

On August 21, a young Golden Eagle was found standing on the road in Saltville, Virginia. The eagle was initially taken to Southwest Virginia Veterinary Services, a non-wildlife veterinary facility near Lebanon. Although specific details of the initial rescue are unavailable, records state that the bird was unable to fly away when approached. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the next day as a referral.

Latest Update: November 29, 2016

Golden Eagle #16-1934 was released on November 28 at Big Walker Lookout in Wytheville, Virginia. When Dr. Dave released the eagle, the bird flew over a steep cliff and circled around to land in a nearby tree. The young eagle sat in the tree for about an hour, taking in his surroundings, before taking off. Remember to check this eagle's tracking page to follow his adventures!

On August 21, a young Golden Eagle was found standing on the road in Saltville, Virginia. The eagle was initially taken to Southwest Virginia Veterinary Services, a non-wildlife veterinary facility near Lebanon. Although specific details of the initial rescue are unavailable, records state that the bird was unable to fly away when approached. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the next day as a referral.

Latest Update: November 21, 2016

Golden Eagle #16-1934 has been flying well during the past couple of weeks. Due to his stubborn nature, the bird has been a challenging patient, but after continual exercise sessions as well as two creance sessions, the staff feel that this eagle is now ready for release.

On August 21, a young Golden Eagle was found standing on the road in Saltville, Virginia. The eagle was initially taken to Southwest Virginia Veterinary Services, a non-wildlife veterinary facility near Lebanon. Although specific details of the initial rescue are unavailable, records state that the bird was unable to fly away when approached. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the next day as a referral.

Latest Update: November 4, 2016

Golden Eagle #16-1934 has been flying well during the past few weeks. The bird has been challenging for the rehabilitation staff and externs to exercise; while the bird is capable of flying, it is often stubborn and refuses to fly after just a few passes. The rehabilitation staff split up the eagle's exercise into two sessions a day for a couple of weeks; the bird is now back to one session a day, and typically flies about 15 passes.

On August 21, a young Golden Eagle was found standing on the road in Saltville, Virginia. The eagle was initially taken to Southwest Virginia Veterinary Services, a non-wildlife veterinary facility near Lebanon. Although specific details of the initial rescue are unavailable, records state that the bird was unable to fly away when approached. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center the next day as a referral.

Latest Update: September 20, 2016

During the last three weeks, Golden Eagle #16-1934 has remained in flight pen A-1 for physical conditioning and monitoring. The young bird is exercised daily by rehabilitation staff members, who report that on average, the eagle is able to complete seven to eight passes while maintaining acceptable form: feet tucked, wings and body balanced, and proper height.

Bald Eagle #16-2217 [CP93]

On October 2, animal control officers in Portsmouth, Virginia answered a call about two adult Bald Eagles down on the ground with their talons locked together. The two eagles were likely engaged in a territorial dispute. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to the situation; when the officer approached the two eagles, one of the birds flew away. The remaining injured bird was captured and transported to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, where the eagle was stabilized before being transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 28, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-2217 was released on Wednesday, November 23, in front of a crowd of about 125 people. The bird took off and flew straight away from the crowd, through the trees, and out of sight.

On October 2, animal control officers in Portsmouth, Virginia answered a call about two adult Bald Eagles down on the ground with their talons locked together. The two eagles were likely engaged in a territorial dispute. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to the situation; when the officer approached the two eagles, one of the birds flew away. The remaining injured bird was captured and transported to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, where the eagle was stabilized before being transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 18, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-2217 has been flying beautifully with the GPS transmitter this week, and today, Dr. Dave determined that the bird is ready for release next week.

On October 2, animal control officers in Portsmouth, Virginia answered a call about two adult Bald Eagles down on the ground with their talons locked together. The two eagles were likely engaged in a territorial dispute. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to the situation; when the officer approached the two eagles, one of the birds flew away. The remaining injured bird was captured and transported to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, where the eagle was stabilized before being transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 16, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-2217 has been flying well during the past two weeks. The eagle's flight is strong, and the bird typically flies more than 15 passes during each exercise session.

On October 2, animal control officers in Portsmouth, Virginia answered a call about two adult Bald Eagles down on the ground with their talons locked together. The two eagles were likely engaged in a territorial dispute. A Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer responded to the situation; when the officer approached the two eagles, one of the birds flew away. The remaining injured bird was captured and transported to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, where the eagle was stabilized before being transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 17, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-2217 has been doing well during the past two weeks. The eagle's lacerations have healed completely, and the bruising and swelling on the eagle's chest and shoulder have greatly improved. On October 13, the eagle was moved to a small outdoor enclosure for two days of monitoring; since the eagle appeared to be doing well, the bird was moved to a large flight pen on October 15. The eagle will be exercised daily so that it can regain its flight condition for release. 

Northern Saw-whet Owl #16-2362


Latest Update: November 18, 2016

Northern Saw-whet Owl #16-2362 was moved to the Center's outdoor aviary complex. Though owls are typically housed in the outdoor B-pens, the the staff had to make special considerations for this small patient; the aviary cages are the only outdoor pens that can safely house the Saw-whet Owl and prevent escape.

Eastern Ratsnake #16-2319

On October 19, an Eastern Ratsnake was rescued on a property in King and Queen County, where the homeowner observed the snake with a bulge in its abdomen in mid-September and again in mid-October. The homeowner thought the bulge hadn't moved and later noticed that a golf ball she placed in the chicken coop was missing (people will sometimes place golf balls or wooden eggs in coops to encourage chickens to lay eggs in a particular place). The rescuers captured the snake and brought it to a local animal hospital for an assessment.

Latest Update: November 9, 2016

The veterinary team has been assessing daily how well Eastern Ratsnake #16-2319's surgical site is healing. On November 3, the snake's incision opened up and needed to be re-sutured.

Black Bear cub #16-1813

On the night of August 8, a small female bear cub was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia. The bear was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator in the area where she was stabilized; VDGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki transported the cub to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 28, 2016

On Friday, October 28, Black Bear cub #16-1813 will be darted and sedated for a move to the Black Bear Complex. The bear will be tagged with white and pink ear tags (one in each ear) and will spend the next 24 hours in the transition area of yard #2. On Saturday, the gate will be opened and the bear will be allowed to mingle with the other 10 cubs in the yard. 

On the night of August 8, a small female bear cub was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia. The bear was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator in the area where she was stabilized; VDGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki transported the cub to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: September 14, 2016

Thursday, September 15 is moving day for several bear cubs! In the morning, the rehabilitation team will set two large live traps to attempt to catch the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Most will move to the Black Bear Complex after an examination from Drs. Ernesto and Peach. On deck to move:

On the night of August 8, a small female bear cub was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia. The bear was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator in the area where she was stabilized; VDGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki transported the cub to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: August 30, 2016

Black Bear cubs #16-1654 [Pink Tag] and #16-1813 have been doing well in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during the past few weeks. Pink Tag has recovered well from her jaw fracture and appears to be fully healed. On Thursday, the two cubs will gain additional roommates -- neighbor #16-1713 [Double Pink Tag] will be introduced, and it's also likely that the door to neighboring cubs Green Tag and Orange Tag will be opened.

On the night of August 8, a small female bear cub was hit by a car in Alleghany County, Virginia. The bear was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator in the area where she was stabilized; VDGIF Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki transported the cub to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: August 16, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1813 has been doing well since her admission to the Wildlife Center; the bear didn't experience any significant injuries or lingering problems from being hit by a car. On August 12, the staff moved to the bear to Large Mammal Isolation, so that the cub could be a nearby "neighbor" for Black Bear cub #16-1713, who is continuing to recover from elbow surgery in the connecting chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure.

Black Bear #16-1817

On the morning of August 10, an adult Black Bear was trapped in Winchester, Virginia. The bear was very skinny and had significant hair loss, likely due to mange. A VDGIF biologist transported the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 20, 2016

On October 19, Dr. Ernesto was able to successfully dart and anesthetize Black Bear #16-1817 for an examination. The bear's fur has grown back in beautifully; the staff were pleased with the bear's condition and appearance. Blood was drawn for analysis, and several skin biopsies were taken for a study at the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study (SCWDS). A skin scraping was also taken to check for mites -- no mites were found.

The bear will remain at the Center at least until January.

On the morning of August 10, an adult Black Bear was trapped in Winchester, Virginia. The bear was very skinny and had significant hair loss, likely due to mange. A VDGIF biologist transported the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: September 21, 2016

On September 21, Dr. Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear #16-1817 for an examination. The veterinary team took a skin scraping to check for additional mange mites and also took several skin biopsies. Licensed veterinary technician Leigh-Ann was happy to report that no mites were found on the skin scraping, which meant the bear was cleared to move to the Black Bear Complex. Dr. Peach was pleased to see the bear's hair growing back nicely.

On the morning of August 10, an adult Black Bear was trapped in Winchester, Virginia. The bear was very skinny and had significant hair loss, likely due to mange. A VDGIF biologist transported the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: August 25, 2016

On August 24, Black Bear #16-1817 was darted and anesthetized for a physical examination and another injection of an anti-parasitic medication. Dr. Ernesto is pleased to see some of the bear's hair already growing back, but the bear still has a long road to recovery. The bear has been quiet the past few days, though is eating.

Bald Eagle #16-1664

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: October 17, 2016

Last month, the veterinary team continued to monitor Bald Eagle #16-1664. After observing the eagle's limitations with and without pain medication, the staff believe that the bird can be placed as a non-releasable education bird; it does not appear to be experiencing any discomfort.

The staff first need to submit paperwork with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to get approval for placement; once permission is received, the staff will begin looking for a suitable location for this young eagle. The approval and permitting process typically takes several months.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 24, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1664 has not been flying well in flight enclosure A3. The bird is unable to gain altitude and consistently tilts to one side while flying to compensate for the reduced mobility in his injured wing.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 12, 2016

Wildlife Center rehabilitation staff have been monitoring Bald Eagle #16-1664 in outdoor enclosure A3, where it is housed with two other eagles. During daily exercise the eagle has not been able to fly well. The bird is unable to gain enough height to successfully perch, and also has a significant tilt to the right in flight. While this is most likely due to the eagle’s compromised left wing, the Wildlife Center will continue the observation process.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1664 has been doing well in one of the Center's outdoor enclosures during the past week. The bird is able to get to high perches, is holding both wings appropriately, and is eating well.

During the next few weeks, Center veterinarians will re-evaluate the eagle's left carpal ("wrist") joint to see if the bird is able to fly in a larger space. At this point, the veterinarians know that the bird is unable to extend his left wing fully, due to the compromised joint.

Broad-winged Hawk #16-2175

On September 27, an adult Broad-winged Hawk was found on the ground, unable to fly, near Beaver Creek Reservoir in Albemarle County. The hawk was transported to the Wildlife Center by outreach department volunteer Pam, shortly after the hawk was discovered.

Hawk #16-2175 was perching in its crate prior to the initial assessment and appeared bright and alert. A physical exam revealed retinal tears in both eyes, swelling on the left wing, and a wound on the right leg.

Latest Update: October 11, 2016

On October 6, the vet staff began physical therapy and laser therapy (performed every other day) on the left wing of Broad-winged Hawk #16-2175. The hawk has consistently reach 80-85% extension in the left wing, however showed signs of discomfort during the most recent session of physical therapy.

The vet staff will monitor the progress of the hawk's wing injury, and repeat radiographs are scheduled for late October to assess healing of the left metacarpal bone.

Black Bear cub #16-1874

On August 16, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up a Black Bear cub wearing a dog collar in Floyd County, Virginia. The bear was extremely tame and readily approached people. Based on the bear's behavior, Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki suspects this cub was kept as an illegal pet for at least several months.

Latest Update: September 15, 2016

Five Black Bear cubs were successfully moved to the transition area of the Black Bear Complex today. Double Pink Tag [16-1713] was the first caught; she was brought into the Center's hospital for her six-week post-op radiographs. Drs. Peach and Ernesto said the healed elbow fracture looks "okay"; while it's not perfect, it does appear to be stable and well-healed at this point. The bear does have less range of motion in that limb, but at this point, the veterinarians don't believe it will hinder her.

On August 16, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up a Black Bear cub wearing a dog collar in Floyd County, Virginia. The bear was extremely tame and readily approached people. Based on the bear's behavior, Black Bear Project Leader Jaime Sajecki suspects this cub was kept as an illegal pet for at least several months.

Latest Update: September 14, 2016

Thursday, September 15 is moving day for several bear cubs! In the morning, the rehabilitation team will set two large live traps to attempt to catch the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Most will move to the Black Bear Complex after an examination from Drs. Ernesto and Peach. On deck to move:

Black Bear #16-1713

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: September 15, 2016

Five Black Bear cubs were successfully moved to the transition area of the Black Bear Complex today. Double Pink Tag [16-1713] was the first caught; she was brought into the Center's hospital for her six-week post-op radiographs. Drs. Peach and Ernesto said the healed elbow fracture looks "okay"; while it's not perfect, it does appear to be stable and well-healed at this point. The bear does have less range of motion in that limb, but at this point, the veterinarians don't believe it will hinder her.

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: September 14, 2016

Thursday, September 15 is moving day for several bear cubs! In the morning, the rehabilitation team will set two large live traps to attempt to catch the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Most will move to the Black Bear Complex after an examination from Drs. Ernesto and Peach. On deck to move:

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: August 30, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1713 has been doing well during the past couple of weeks. The cub appears to be bearing her full weight on her injured leg, and has been walking normally in her small enclosure. On Thursday, the veterinarians will allow the bear access to the rest of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, which will give her more room to walk and climb, and will also give her bear cub roommates, rather than just next-door neighbors.

If the bear continues using her leg normally, she may be moved to the Bear Complex in the next two weeks, pending radiographs.

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: August 16, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1713 has been doing well in the two weeks following her elbow surgery. The bear has been living in a small portion of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; at this point, the bear is limited in movement and only has access to the connecting chute between the two larger parts of the enclosure. On Tuesday, August 16, Dr. Ernesto darted the bear to closely check on her injured forelimb; he noted that, at this point, the bear has limited movement in her elbow, but that it was too early to tell if this would be a long-term problem.

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: August 4, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1713 recovered from Wednesday's surgery well, and is back resting comfortably at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Peach reports, "The surgery was long and complicated -- as most elbow fracture surgeries are -- but in the end, Dr. Padron was pleased with the outcome and thinks that her chances for recovery are good. We'll expect her to have less 'range of motion' in that elbow compared to the other elbow from fibrous tissue formation around that joint, but it should not cause her any pain."

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: August 3, 2016

Drs. Ernesto and Peach consulted with several orthopedic specialists about surgical repair options for Black Bear cub #16-1713. Surgeons concurred that a technique called a "cross pinning fixation" was in order for this particular type of fracture. Even with this specialized fixation, the bear may still experience long-term issues, including limited flexion in the limb and issues with growth plate development.

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Black Bear #16-1713 made it through the weekend! The cub is still in critical condition, but has made some small improvements and is also eating some soft food on her own. Dr. Peach repeated radiographs on Saturday and noted that the bear's chest and abdomen looked better than they did upon admission; the bear's blood work had also improved with a higher red blood cell count. However, as the bear began to move around more, Dr. Peach noted that the bear was favoring her right front leg, which remained very swollen.

At about 10:00 p.m. on July 27, Dr. Ernesto received a call on the after-hours emergency phone about a bear cub that had been hit by a vehicle in Crozet, Virginia. The cub had been crossing the road with her mother, who was hit and killed by a vehicle. The local animal control officer was planning on bringing the cub to the Wildlife Center, but unfortunately, three hours later Dr. Ernesto learned that the cub managed to evade capture and climbed a tree for the night.

Latest Update: July 29, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1713 remains in grave condition today. This morning, Dr. Peach treated the bear and performed additional diagnostics, including repeat blood work, radiographs, and another ultrasound. While the bear's blood pressure is better than yesterday, several of the cub's blood values have decreased. Typically this would indicate that the bear is losing blood, though Dr. Peach is not able to find a significant source of the blood loss in the bear's chest or abdomen.

The bear will receive sedatives, pain medication, and supplemental oxygen throughout the weekend.

Black Bear cub #16-1654

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: September 15, 2016

Five Black Bear cubs were successfully moved to the transition area of the Black Bear Complex today. Double Pink Tag [16-1713] was the first caught; she was brought into the Center's hospital for her six-week post-op radiographs. Drs. Peach and Ernesto said the healed elbow fracture looks "okay"; while it's not perfect, it does appear to be stable and well-healed at this point. The bear does have less range of motion in that limb, but at this point, the veterinarians don't believe it will hinder her.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: September 14, 2016

Thursday, September 15 is moving day for several bear cubs! In the morning, the rehabilitation team will set two large live traps to attempt to catch the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Most will move to the Black Bear Complex after an examination from Drs. Ernesto and Peach. On deck to move:

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: August 30, 2016

Black Bear cubs #16-1654 [Pink Tag] and #16-1813 have been doing well in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during the past few weeks. Pink Tag has recovered well from her jaw fracture and appears to be fully healed. On Thursday, the two cubs will gain additional roommates -- neighbor #16-1713 [Double Pink Tag] will be introduced, and it's also likely that the door to neighboring cubs Green Tag and Orange Tag will be opened.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: August 16, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1654 has been doing well in the week following her "hardware" removal. The cub has been eating well and was slowly transition from a soft meal to a regular "hard" bear cub meal, which includes dog food, bird seed, fruits, veggies, insects, and fish.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: August 10, 2016

On August 8, Dr. Ernesto checked on Black Bear cub #16-1654. He noted that the cub's external fixator looked slightly different -- it appeared as though the stabilizing jaw fixator may have moved slightly. On Tuesday, August 9, the bear was darted and anesthetized for a full examination.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: August 5, 2016

On August 4, Drs. Ernesto and Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear cub #16-1654 for follow-up radiographs. It's been nearly two weeks since the bear's surgery.

Both veterinarians were pleased with the healing progress of the bear's fractured jaw. The bear hasn't been bothering her external fixator, despite not wearing a protective e-collar. Additional radiographs are scheduled for August 18, and the veterinarians will make a plan for removing the fixator based on the results that day.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Black Bear #16-1654 did well in the Center's bear pen throughout the weekend. The cub is exploring her enclosure, eating well, and not bothering her external fixator. On August 3, Dr. Ernesto will anesthetize the bear for a 10-day post-op evaluation. 

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 29, 2016

What a difference a week makes! One week following her admission, Black Bear cub #16-1654 is enough of a handful that she's making daily treatments quite difficult for the veterinary staff. The bear's breathing has greatly improved, and she no longer requires sedation. Today, the team decided to move her to the outdoor Bear Pen enclosure where she'll have more room. At this point, the staff will offer her pain medication and antibiotics in her (very soft) food twice a day.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 27, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1654 continues to slowly improve. Dr. Ernesto reported that the cub was more feisty today, and getting difficult to handle. The bear cub ate her very soft meal last night -- a mix of canned dog food, very small pieces of softened strawberries, and baby food. Since the cub is getting difficult to handle, as long as she continues to self-feed, tomorrow will be her last day of injectable medications. The bear will be switched to oral medications (delivered in her food) on Friday.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 26, 2016

Dr. Ernesto was pleased to report that Black Bear cub #16-1654 was brighter and even a little feisty on the morning of July 26. The cub managed to get her e-collar off, and did eat her soft meal yesterday evening. While at rest, the cub is breathing a little more easily, and Dr. Ernesto discontinued the supplemental oxygen. When the bear is restrained for treatments, the bear still wheezes and has difficulty breathing, but the staff is encouraged by her progress.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-1654 pulled through the weekend. On Saturday morning, the bear was very quiet and easily restrained; the bear had harsh breathing sounds due to fluid in her chest cavity. Dr. Peach took chest radiographs and performed a thoracentesis -- a puncture and drainage of the thoracic cavity. Dr. Peach removed about five milliliters of air from both sides of the bear's chest, though no significant amount of blood or fluid was removed.

On Friday, July 22, a woman was driving past the Wildlife Center of Virginia and saw the car in front of her hit both a Black Bear sow and a cub as they crossed the road. The sow spun around and continued into the woods just off of the road; the cub remained motionless at the side of the road. The woman immediately came into the Center's lobby to report the incident.

Latest Update: July 22, 2016

Dr. Dave and licensed veterinary technician Leigh-Ann took the bear cub to surgery within an hour of her admission. Dr. Dave was able to successfully stabilize the cub's jaw fracture with an external fixator; four metal pins were inserted perpendicular into the bear's jaw, then a metal bar was attached to the pins parallel to the bottom jaw.

Black Bear cubs of 2016

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: September 15, 2016

Five Black Bear cubs were successfully moved to the transition area of the Black Bear Complex today. Double Pink Tag [16-1713] was the first caught; she was brought into the Center's hospital for her six-week post-op radiographs. Drs. Peach and Ernesto said the healed elbow fracture looks "okay"; while it's not perfect, it does appear to be stable and well-healed at this point. The bear does have less range of motion in that limb, but at this point, the veterinarians don't believe it will hinder her.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: August 25, 2016

Green Tag's surgery went well yesterday; Dr. Ernesto was pleased with how everything went and was also pleased with how things looked internally. He noted that the colon and intestines looked healthy; no signs of infection were present. Green Tag recovered from surgery well.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: August 22, 2016

During the week of August 15, Critter Cam viewers noted that Black Bear cub "Orange Tag" had a similar hind end issue as Green Tag did the week before. The veterinarians attempted to capture the cub for several days, but Orange Tag managed to evade capture each time and spent a fair amount of time in the top of a very tall tree. Finally, on Friday, August 19, the bear was able to be trapped in a large live trap left in the bear yard.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

On July 24, Critter Cam viewers noted that "No Tag" had a wound on his left front paw. Tori and Elise, the rehabilitation interns, carefully set a large live trap in the bear yard, hoping to catch No Tag. Instead, they ended up catching Pink Tag, the two-year-old female who is living with the cubs! With Pink Tag safely contained, Dr. Ernesto was able to enter the bear yard to dart No Tag.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 13, 2016

The seven bear cubs settled into transition area #2 of the Black Bear Complex on Monday evening; the rehabilitation staff checked on the cubs before leaving for the evening. The staff planned on leaving the cubs in the transition area for one to two weeks to "meet and greet" their neighbor, Black Bear #16-0364 [Pink Tag] -- but little Orange Tag quickly changed the plan for everyone!

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: July 12, 2016

On July 11, the rehabilitation staff moved all seven bear cubs to the Black Bear Complex! The team used large humane traps, baited with tasty fried chicken, to trap each bear in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; each trapped bear was then loaded onto the Polaris for a quick drive to transition area #2 in the Bear Complex.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: June 7, 2016

The three Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure. According to Dr. Kelli, they love climbing on the logs in their enclosure and swinging on the fire hose hammock. Rehabilitation interns Elise and Tori set up a new tire swing this weekend for the cubs, but so far the cubs haven’t yet used it.

Current cub weights (as of June 6): 
White Tag: 4.9kg
Red Tag: 7.5 kg
No Tag: 5.6kg

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: May 19, 2016

On the afternoon of May 17, the three bear cubs were moved to the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. No Tag was the first to come out of the zinger crate, followed by Red Tag, then White Tag. White Tag watched her brothers from the safety of a bear den, while Red Tag and No Tag began climbing the walls and logs in the enclosure.

The bears are doing well so far, and the Center staff are working on diagnosing issues with the Critter Cam in this enclosure.

In April 2016, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year’s bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2016. In some cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers; in one case, a cub was truly orphaned after his mother was killed by a vehicle. Another cub had injuries likely sustained from an animal attack.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

The trio of Black Bear cubs is doing well at the Wildlife Center. Until this week, the cubs have been housed in zinger crates in the Center’s Metal Cage Complex; this outdoor structure offers protection from the elements and has been a quiet place for the cubs to get used to bottle-feeding and meet one another. Now that the cubs are introduced and are getting more playful with one another, it’s time to move to a bigger enclosure!

Black Bear cubs #16-1441, 1442, and 1443

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Latest Update: September 14, 2016

Thursday, September 15 is moving day for several bear cubs! In the morning, the rehabilitation team will set two large live traps to attempt to catch the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Most will move to the Black Bear Complex after an examination from Drs. Ernesto and Peach. On deck to move:

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Latest Update: August 25, 2016

Green Tag's surgery went well yesterday; Dr. Ernesto was pleased with how everything went and was also pleased with how things looked internally. He noted that the colon and intestines looked healthy; no signs of infection were present. Green Tag recovered from surgery well.

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Latest Update: August 24, 2016

On August 23, Dr. Ernesto checked on Green Tag and Orange Tag in the Large Mammal Isolation Complex. Orange Tag appeared to be doing well, but unfortunately, Green Tag's rectum prolapsed again -- for the third time.

Dr. Ernesto will take Green Tag to surgery on the morning of August 24 to perform a colopexy. In this procedure, a portion of the bear's colon will be attached to the abdominal wall, which should prevent additional prolapses.

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Latest Update: August 22, 2016

During the week of August 15, Critter Cam viewers noted that Black Bear cub "Orange Tag" had a similar hind end issue as Green Tag did the week before. The veterinarians attempted to capture the cub for several days, but Orange Tag managed to evade capture each time and spent a fair amount of time in the top of a very tall tree. Finally, on Friday, August 19, the bear was able to be trapped in a large live trap left in the bear yard.

On the night of Sunday, July 3, a sow was hit and killed by a vehicle as she was crossing a road in Highland County with her four cubs. One of the cubs, a female, was also struck by the vehicle and killed. The remaining three cubs were uninjured and sought safety in nearby trees.

Latest Update: August 16, 2016

During the weekend, it was noted via Critter Cam that Green Tag had diarrhea. On Sunday, the bear appeared to have an injury to his hind end, though it was difficult to interpret what the issue was. On Monday, August 15, Dr. Ernesto was able to safely dart Green Tag, and the cub was brought down into the Center's hospital for a full examination.

Black Bear cub #16-0598

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: August 9, 2016

On August 9, Dr. Ernesto darted and anesthetized Black Bear cub #16-0598 [No Tag] so that he could examine the cub's healing paw. Dr. Ernesto was pleased to see that the bear's paw looked much better; while the wound still isn't entirely closed, much of the wound has healed and the cub's fur has already started growing back. After the wound was cleaned, Dr. Ernesto and students returned the bear cub into yard #2 of the Bear Complex.

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: August 3, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-0598 [No Tag] has proven to be a typical difficult Black Bear cub patient. The cub didn't keep his protective e-collar on, nor did he leave his bandage alone. Fortunately, a move to the bear pen enclosure did seem to distract the bear enough to leave his paw injury alone while it was unbandaged, and the cub has been eating his medication in food.

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: July 25, 2016

On July 24, Critter Cam viewers noted that "No Tag" had a wound on his left front paw. Tori and Elise, the rehabilitation interns, carefully set a large live trap in the bear yard, hoping to catch No Tag. Instead, they ended up catching Pink Tag, the two-year-old female who is living with the cubs! With Pink Tag safely contained, Dr. Ernesto was able to enter the bear yard to dart No Tag.

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: May 11, 2016

When Black Bear cub #16-0598 arrived at Virginia Tech’s Black Bear Research Center, the cub was placed in a crate facing the surrogate sow and her two cubs. One of the two cubs is known to the Wildlife Center as #16-0305, which was fostered onto the sow in April. 

Late at night on May 9, a Black Bear sow and her two cubs were crossing a road in Staunton, Virginia, when the mother bear and one cub were hit and killed by a vehicle. The surviving cub was found alone by the road; a deputy with the Augusta County Sheriff's Office picked up the cub and called the Wildlife Center's emergency on-call phone.

Latest Update: May 11, 2016

On May 10, Dr. Dave anesthetized Black Bear cub #16-0598 for a complete physical exam, radiographs, and blood work. Results were within normal limits and the cub was deemed healthy.

Bald Eagle #16-1663

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1663 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1663 has been doing well in one of the Center's outdoor enclosures during the past week. The bird is perching normally and doesn't appear to be having any balance issues. The veterinary staff will continue to monitor the bird's feet closely during regular foot and feather checks.

Bald Eagle #16-0038

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has remained in flight pen A1, one of the Wildlife Center’s largest outdoor enclosures. The eagle is exercised daily by rehabilitation staff members, who report that the eagle regularly flies approximately 12 laps during each session. Although the eagle is still flying at a low height, on July 31 the bird was observed to be flying with its feet tucked beneath its body. Perching and stamina are reported to be improving as well. As of July 25, the eagle weighed 4.40 kg (9.7 lb).

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: June 8, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has continued daily exercise during the past two months. The eagle has been making gradual improvement, though still is not flying well enough for release. The eagle typically flies an average of 12-14 laps in the Center’s large A-pen enclosure; 10 of those passes are usually good in quality, though sometimes the eagle misses landing on a perch and then struggles to gain height once grounded.

The staff will continue to exercise the eagle each day.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038’s feet continue to slowly heal. On March 28, a routine check revealed that the lesion on the eagle’s left foot was swollen. A topical disinfectant and sealing agent were applied to the wound. Center staff continues to monitor the healing progress during bi-weekly foot and feather checks.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 15, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 remained in a small outdoor enclosure throughout the first half of March. On March 14, the veterinary team re-radiographed the eagle’s healing wing, and found that the fracture was healed and very stable. Dr. Dana noted that the eagle’s left wing is mildly stiff, but the bird is able to achieve full wing extension. The wounds on the eagle’s face and feet continue to heal well.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 1, 2016

On February 21, radiographs were taken to check on Bald Eagle #16-0038’s healing fracture; radiographs showed that the fracture alignment was unchanged. Dr. Dana expected to see a little more healing progress, but it’s likely that the fracture has been slower to callus since it’s been challenging for the vet staff to keep the eagle’s wing completely immobile.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

In the 10 days following her admission, Bald Eagle #16-0038 recovered in the Center’s holding room. At first, the eagle mostly left her wing bandage and body wrap alone, but soon it became a daily challenge to get the eagle to leave her bandages on! The eagle regularly picked at her wing bandages, and on a few occasions managed to partly remove or loosen them; Dr. Dana also noted that the bird is so large and strong, that even the body wrap doesn’t completely prevent the bird from slightly moving her injured wing.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 5, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 is recovering quietly at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Dana reports that the eagle is perching, eating well, and mostly leaving her bandages alone, which can be an important component of the healing process! The eagle’s heart rate has been within normal limits during the past two days.

The veterinary team continues to clean the eagle’s foot and face wounds daily; all lacerations are currently static. Repeat radiographs are scheduled for February 13.

Bald Eaglet #15-0733

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 27, 2016

During the past three months, the rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0733. The bird's flight capabilities have not changed much during this time period; the bird is not able to fly all that well, and often flies low to the ground. While the eagle's initial injury may be causing permanent flight deficits, there is also a chance that the limited flight is due to the number of broken feathers the eagle has. At this time of year, many eagles are molting; Bald Eagle #15-0733 has several new feathers growing in.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: March 16, 2016

During the past two months, the rehabilitation staff exercised Bald Eagle #15-0733. Despite daily exercise sessions, the eagle continued to have poor endurance and was often unable to make no more than five to seven passes from end to end. Interim wildlife rehabilitator Kendra noted that Bald Eagle #15-0733 was frequently flappy while flying, unable to maintain height, and often grounded after only a few passes.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

After several weeks of rest following imping, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was started on daily exercise in flight pen A3 (along with Bald Eagle #15-1339) on January 28.

Rehabilitation intern Kendra reported that the eagle had poor stamina and maneuvering the first two days of exercise, but this is not unexpected as the eagle becomes re-accustomed to the larger enclosure. The staff will continue to exercise the eagle daily.
 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 4, 2016

On December 24, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was brought into to the Wildlife Center’s hospital for his imping procedure. Seven feathers [five primaries and two secondary feathers] were replaced on the left wing and four feathers [two primaries and two secondary] were replaced on the right wing. The team also replaced eight tail feathers. During the procedure, the team also noted that the eagle had a several flight feathers in “blood”, indicating that these feathers were growing in on their own.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in the FP4 flight pen during the last month. On December 17, one of the Center’s A-pens [A2] became available, and the young eagle was moved to the larger enclosure. Since Bald Eagle #15-0733 is now in a larger flight pen and the likelihood of causing feather damage is minimized, the veterinary staff scheduled the eagle’s imping [feather replacement] procedure for December 24.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

During the past two months, Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in a small enclosure.  On November 10, the young bird was moved to a slightly larger enclosure – FP4.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: September 10, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 still has not been seen flying much. Repeat radiographs performed on September 7 were largely unremarkable and shows that the fracture site continues to heal. The staff noticed that the bird had many broken tail and wing feathers and decided to move Bald Eaglet #15-0733 to the A3 tower to prevent further damage to the feathers.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well.  Both are eating and gaining weight. 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 24, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s daily physical therapy sessions have gone well during the past week. During each physical therapy session, one of the veterinarians extends the eagle’s wing to stretch the muscles and ligaments in the wing.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

Follow-up radiographs of Bald Eagle #15-0733’s healing wing were taken on June 4; they revealed that a callus was continuing to form over the fracture sites. Dr. Meghan noted, however, that the bird’s wing was severely contacted. The bird’s bandage was removed to allow the young eagle to extend its wing; daily physical therapy sessions were scheduled.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 was anesthetized for radiographs on May 29. Dr. Meghan found that calluses were forming on both wing fractures, though there were signs of osteomyelitis

Black Bear cub #16-0487

On April 30, a female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center after she was found in Greene County, Virginia. A citizen found the cub in his pasture, and at first thought the small bear as a cat; when he realized it was a cub, he placed her in a cat carrier and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The DGIF officer who picked up the cub believes the bear was likely displaced by the nearby Rocky Mount fire in Shenandoah National Park.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-0487 (White Tag) has been doing well during the past two weeks at the Wildlife Center; the cub has been drinking some formula from a bottle, but prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a mush bowl. The cub currently weighs 3.14 kg.

On May 12, White Tag was introduced to her new brother, Black Bear cub #16-0598. The two cubs have been getting along well. Here’s a video of White Tag before she was introduced to the other cub.

Black Bear cub #16-0568

On May 5, a citizen found a bear cub on the side of the road in Pittsylvania County. The cub was alone and had a wound on its back. The bear was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who cleaned maggots from the wound and treated the bear with an anti-parasitic medication and medicinal honey. The following day, a Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 17, 2016

Black Bear cub #16-0568 (Red Tag) has been healing well during the past week. The cub’s wounds and sutures are checked and cleaned daily, and Dr. Dana is pleased with the healing progress. On Friday, May 13, Dr. Dana decided to remove the cub’s e-collar; on Sunday, May 15, the cub was cleared to be introduced to the two other bear cubs. The rehabilitation staff will be monitoring the cubs closely to ensure no sutures are accidentally removed in cub wrestling matches. If all goes according to plan, Red Tag will have his sutures removed on Sunday, May 22. 

Bald Eagle #15-0355

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

During the past six weeks, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been exercised daily in one of the Center’s flight enclosures. Despite many months of exercise and rehabilitation, the eagle has not made significant improvements in stamina or quality of flight. Given the eagle’s medical and rehabilitation history, the veterinary team decided to deem this eagle non-releasable. Center staff will begin the process of looking for placement for this Bald Eagle. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

During the last two weeks of January, the rehabilitation staff continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and administered daily anti-inflammatories to see if the pain-reliever would treat the bird’s left wing droop. The bird continued to make at least 15 passes end-to-end, but was very flappy and appeared to be exerting considerable effort to gain height while flying.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

During the week of January 11, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was cage-rested and monitored. The veterinary team was able to keep an eye on the eagle through one of the Wildlife Center’s webcams; the staff continued to note the eagle’s left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 13, 2016

Bald Eagle #15-0355 was exercising well last week, although the bird was not able to attain the optimum level of exercise to be considered for release. Mid-week, the bird’s flight became a little more labored; the veterinary staff adjusted the size of the protective carpal bumpers on the eagle's "wrists" to see if smaller bumpers would make the bird more comfortable. Toward the end of the week, the eagle displayed an intermittent left wing droop.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: January 6, 2016

During the past 10 days, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has continued to fly well during daily exercise. The staff and students report that she is regularly making 10-12 passes in flight pen A1 before becoming tired, showing an increase in stamina. The eagle will continue with daily exercise and needs to reach the optimum level of 15 passes end-to-end consistently for at least a week before consideration for release.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 28, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been flying well during the past few weeks in flight pen A1. Wildlife rehabilitator Leighann began pushing the eagle to the “optimum exercise level” on December 27 and said that the eagle is doing well, but needs a little bit more work on stamina. As long as exercise goes well during the next couple of weeks, the staff hope that the eagle will be able to be released in 2016. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: December 9, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has made slow and steady improvement in the past three weeks. The bird is now consistently flying 10 passes end-to-end and has been able to gain and maintain good height during exercise sessions. The eagle’s stamina has also increased, but Bald Eagle #15-0355 has yet to reach optimal level [15 passes end-to-end] and will continue with daily exercise sessions to improve her conditioning in the upcoming weeks.  

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 during the past two weeks. The eagle is still not flying well consistently but has shown some improvement. The eagle often becomes tired or stubborn during exercise sessions and gains only moderate height in flight, but is making more passes and better height than earlier this month.

A feet and feather exam on November 16 showed several broken feather tips, but the eagle is in good body condition overall.

Daily exercise will continue, giving the eagle more time to gain strength and stamina.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: November 6, 2015

On October 22, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to flight pen A2. After several days of adjusting to the larger space, the rehabilitation staff started daily exercise sessions with the eagle. At this point, the eagle is not flying well, though several weeks of conditioning will be needed to determine if there are permanent flight deficits due to the eagle’s injuries. The staff report that the eagle is able to fly a total of about six to seven passes right now, mostly at low altitudes. Exercise will continue during the month of November.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 11, 2015

During the past week, Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been lightly exercised by the rehabilitation staff. Though the bird has made some improvement in her ability to fly, she is still not flying very well.

On September 11, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #15-0355 to the tower in A3 for further rest and recovery, where the eagle now shares an enclosure with eaglet #15-0733.
 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: September 7, 2015

The veterinary staff have been doing a fair amount of “eagle shuffling” this summer – with 9-10 Bald Eagle patients in care all summer long, there has been a lot of bird-moving to ensure that the eagles that are closest to release can be safely exercised and prepared for life back in the wild.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: August 14, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been doing well during the past month and has a good appetite – the bird seems to prefer rat versus fish for daily meals.

On July 27, the veterinary staff noticed a small lesion on the eagle’s right wing and applied ointment and a bandage. The staff also noted that the eagle was molting several of her primary and tail feathers – typical for eagles in late summer.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 has been living with eaglets #15-1250 and #15-1348 during the past couple of weeks. While the adult eagle has not been regularly exercised since the addition of the young eagles, the staff note that the bird still struggles to get lift during flight, and often has trouble flying to high perches. With the eaglets growing and needing more room for exercise of their own, Bald Eagle #15-0355 was moved to a smaller outdoor enclosure.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 22, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 daily. At first it seemed that the eagle was making slight improvements during sessions; however, the bird still has difficulty maintaining flight and is only able to make two to four passes. The eagle also frequently hops along the ground instead of flying during exercise sessions. The rehabilitation staff will continue to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0355 and monitor its flying abilities. 

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

The rehabilitation staff has been exercising Bald Eagle #15-0355 in flight pen A1 for the past ten days. During daily exercise sessions, the eagle has poor stamina and cannot gain height during flight; rather than fly end-to-end in the enclosure, the eagle often hops along the ground and cannot fly up to the perches. The eagle has been observed on the Critter Cam as spending most of her time on the lower A-frame perch.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0355 (wearing high-heel duct tape bumpers) has been monitored in the large outdoor enclosure during the past two weeks. The eagle has been maneuvering around the enclosure but has difficulty flying to the higher perches.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 21, 2015

After moving Bald Eagle #15-0355 to an outdoor pen on May 8, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff monitored the eagle for a left wing droop. The eagle was maneuvering well around the small outdoor enclosure [C1] and showed no signs of a wing droop, although the bird’s appetite was not strong.

On April 18, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria, Virginia. A private citizen noticed that the eagle was injured and called Animal Control of Fairfax County.  An officer quickly responded to the scene and transported the eagle to a local animal clinic where the staff cleaned the eagle’s wounds, administered fluids, and provided pain medication. The eagle was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #15-0355 on April 19.

Latest Update: May 11, 2015

During the past three weeks, veterinary staff continued to conservatively treat Bald Eagle #15-0355’s broken wing and leg. The veterinary staff performed physical therapy sessions and bandage changes every three days. On April 28, Dr. Meghan carefully re-examined the bird’s wing and leg and noted that swelling was decreasing at both fracture sites.

Bald Eagles #16-2439 and #16-2440

On November 15, two mature Bald Eagles were found down on the ground, next to a deer carcass. The birds were unable to stand and were exhibiting neurologic symptoms -- indicating possible poisoning. The birds were triaged by a permitted wildlife rehabilitator and driven to the Wildlife Center that same day.

Black Bear cub #16-2448

On November 17, a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries officer picked up a Black Bear cub in Frederick County, Virginia. The cub's mother was reportedly shot, and the cub was observed under a citizen's porch for a few days. The cub appeared to have mange. The cub was taken to the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center on November 17 and transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Eastern Screech-owl #16-2185

On September 28, an Eastern Screech-owl was rescued in Rockbridge County after being attacked by a cat. Free-roaming cats attack a variety of wild animals, including small mammals,snakes, amphibians, songbirds, and occasionally small raptors. Cat attack victims have a low chance of survival, even if they receive medical treatment quickly.

Black Bear cub #16-1133

On June 12, a female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The cub had been seen by a homeowner for several days; when it appeared that the cub was without a sow, the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries trapped the cub.