Current Patients

Bald Eagle #14-1955

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 19, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been cleared for release! Wildlife Center President Ed Clark will release the juvenile bird at Natural Chimneys Park in Mt. Solon, Virginia on Tuesday, December 23 at 11:00 a.m. The release is open to the public; please RSVP to ksluiter@wildlifecenter.org if you plan on attending.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 17, 2014

On Thursday, December 18, DGIF biologist Jeff Cooper will come to the Center to fit Bald Eagle #14-1955 with a GPS transmitter. The eagle will also be banded and pre-release blood work will be drawn for analysis.

If blood work is within normal limits, and the eagle continues to fly well the rest of this week, the bird will likely be released in the Shenandoah Valley next week [Christmas week].
 

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 continues to do well in flight pen A1. The bird is flying and maneuvering well and the vet staff are hoping that this bird will soon be ready for release.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: December 4, 2014

On November 21, Drs. Dave, Helen, and Meghan transported Bald Eagle #14-1955 to Virginia Tech for an examination by board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Phil Pickett. Dr. Pickett used both a direct and an indirect ophthalmoscope to visualize the eagle’s retina.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: November 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying very well during the past few weeks. Rehabilitation intern Jordan reports that the eagle flies an average of 19-20 times during each exercise session, and the bird has great stamina and height in the large A3 flight enclosure.

On Friday, November 21, Drs. Dave, Helen, and Meghan will take the Bald Eagle to Virginia Tech for an in-depth eye examination by board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Phillip Pickett. The results of the eye examination will help determine if this young eagle will be able to be released soon.
 

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: November 6, 2014

On October 24, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #14-0261 to flight pen A1 to be housed with Bald Eagle #14-1955. The staff hoped that a change of location would improve the eagle’s ability to fly.

Shortly after moving to the new enclosure, eagle #14-0261 began flying better, showing improved height and stamina.

The eagle has been exercised daily by Center staff and students. In the video below, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring exercises both eagles [Bald Eagles #14-0261 and #14-1955].

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 14, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying very well during the past two weeks of flight conditioning. The eagle typically flies 15-20 times the length of the flight enclosure and has good strength, stamina, and altitude.

On August 20, a young, male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Pendleton County, West Virginia. The eagle’s rescuer found the bird on the side of the road and called the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. The eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that day.

Latest Update: October 2, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-1955 has been flying well in flight pen A3 during the past week. The rehabilitation staff are exercising the bird daily, and the eagle is flying the length of the enclosure about eight to ten times consistently.

Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2281

On October 21, an adult Eastern Screech-Owl was seen falling to the side of the road after it was struck by a semi-truck. A driver stopped and transported the injured owl to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center where it was given fluids, anti-inflamitories, and supportive care. On October 24, the owl was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia for further care.

Latest Update: December 16, 2014

On November 19, the veterinary staff took another set of radiographs of Eastern Screech-Owl #14-2281. Radiographs revealed that the fracture site was healing well and a stable callus was on the fractured wing. The bandage was removed and the owl was cleared to begin flight conditioning.

Bald Eagle #14-0261

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: December 5, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was flying well in mid-November and on November 21, the bird was moved to flight pen A1 for additional exercise. Within a couple of days of the move, the staff noted that the eagle had a slight left wing droop and was not flying as well. During the next week, the staff carefully monitored the bird; on December 4, the eagle was caught up and anesthetized for radiographs.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 6, 2014

On October 24, the rehabilitation staff moved Bald Eagle #14-0261 to flight pen A1 to be housed with Bald Eagle #14-1955. The staff hoped that a change of location would improve the eagle’s ability to fly.

Shortly after moving to the new enclosure, eagle #14-0261 began flying better, showing improved height and stamina.

The eagle has been exercised daily by Center staff and students. In the video below, rehabilitation intern Jordan Herring exercises both eagles [Bald Eagles #14-0261 and #14-1955].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 1, 2014

On September 29, Bald Eagle #14-0261 had an additional series of radiographs taken to monitor the healing progress of the bird’s left wing. Radigraphs showed improvement; there is less inflammation of the bird’s left carpus [wrist].

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: September 18, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 remained in her C-pen throughout most of August while several other young eagles were conditioned for release in the large flight pens. Every two weeks, the veterinary staff rechecked the eagle’s bloodwork and performed feet and feather checks. Bloodwork returned on July 26 was within normal limits.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 22, 2014

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #14-0261 has continued to have trouble gaining height while flying. The eagle exercises an average of eight times perch-to-perch in her enclosure, but isn’t flying well enough for release. On July 21, routine blood work revealed a low white blood cell count, which could indicate an underlying infection.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 has been flying well in its large outdoor enclosure. The eagle’s right wing droop was noted inconsistently into mid-June, but was apparently not affecting the bird’s ability to fly the length of the enclosure.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 30, 2014

On May 21, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was seen perching in its enclosure displaying an intermittent right wing droop that was not present on intake. The veterinary team also noticed that Bald Eagle #14-0261 had been continuously chewing on both of the protective carpal bumpers that had been placed on its wings. While the droop does not seem to be affecting the bird’s ability to fly, it is suspected to be the result of mild discomfort caused by the carpal bumpers.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 20, 2014

Bald Eagle #14-0261 was re-radiographed on May 20 to check on the healing progress of the bird’s fractured wing tip. Dr. Rich found that the fractured minor metacarpal was completely healed. He also noted a small bone spur on the tip of the eagle’s wing [noted with the red arrow below]; this could be due to a ligament injury that occurred with the fracture. Dr. Rich does not anticipate that this will affect the eagle’s flight; the injury will be re-checked on radiographs in one month.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 7, 2014

On May 7, Bald Eagle #14-0261 was caught up for anesthesia and radiographs. Dr. Rich was pleased to see the eagle’s fracture had a stable callous over the fracture site; however, the fracture still needs additional time to fully heal. Dr. Rich removed the eagle’s wing wrap, and placed it back in the C-pen. The bird will remain on cage rest for the next two weeks. 

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 28, 2014

The veterinary team has continued to monitor Bald Eagle #14-0261 during the last few weeks. Each day, the staff visually checks to ensure that the bandage on the Bald Eagle’s wing is clean and intact.

On April 8, a mature Bald Eagle was found on the tarmac at Washington Dulles International Airport. Rescuers suspected that an airplane clipped the eagle as it was flying near the runway. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator. The rehabilitator kept the bird overnight, and a volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: April 14, 2014

After Bald Eagle #14-0261’s admission, the Wildlife Center veterinarians discussed the treatment plan for the feisty eagle. The uncommon fracture will be a difficult injury to treat, due to the location and the feisty disposition of the eagle. The team decided that a specialized wing wrap would be best to immobilize the fractured metacarpal, although healing will depend on keeping the eagle as quiet as possible.

Great Horned Owlet #14-1746

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: December 3, 2014

On November 30, Great Horned Owlet #14-1746 was transported back to a remote area in Suffolk, Virginia. Wildlife rehabilitators Linda Vetter and Dana Lusher placed the bird’s travel crate on the ground and allowed the owl to leave on its own. After a few minutes, the Great Horned Owl flew out of the crate and perched on a nearby railing adjacent to a forest. After surveying its surroundings, Great Horned Owl #14-1746 flew into the trees and out of sight.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: November 25, 2014

During the past month, Great Horned Owlet #14-1746 has gradually improved its flying abilities during daily flight conditioning sessions. At first, the young owl was stubborn and the owlet would occasionally hoot at the rehabilitation staff and externs. As the staff continued to exercise the owl, the bird’s stamina increased, and the occasional hoots decreased.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: October 10, 2014

Papa G’Ho’s kids are growing up! Great Horned Owlets #14-0404 and 14-0255 both passed mouse school earlier this week and were cleared for release. Both owls were banded, and will be returned to their original nest areas for release this weekend.

Owlets #14-1735 and 14-1746 have been split up into Flight Pens 5 and 6, respectively. The owls are being exercised individually; both are flying well.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: August 22, 2014

On August 15, the rehabilitation staff opened the door of the airline crate and allowed Great Horned Owlet #14-1735 and Papa G’Ho to directly interact. Papa quickly accepted the new owlet.

On July 22, a wildlife rehabilitator from Virginia Beach received a phone call about a juvenile Great Horned Owl that was found on a deck in Chesapeake, Virginia and was attacking the family that lived there. When the rehabilitator arrived at the family’s home to rescue the owl, she observed the owlet approaching the family and gaping for food.

Latest Update: August 15, 2014

Great Horned Owlets #14-0255 and #14-0404 are becoming more and more independent from their Great Horned Owl surrogate Papa G’Ho. At this point in their development, young owls begin to start taking interest in live prey, but are not hunting and catching larger prey on their own. To replicate this natural behavior and to provide practice opportunities for the young owls, the rehabilitation staff placed a large tub with live mice inside the owls’ flight pen. The owlets quickly took notice of the change in their environment and were very curious about the live mice.

Common Raven #14-1100

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: November 21, 2014

We received another post-release Raven update from Maureen, the rescuer of Common Raven #14-1100. Maureen saw the raven outside of her office building on November 20; Maureen tells us that the female raven was with her mate and was preening him!

Maureen took several photos; the female raven is on the right. She has a notable slightly twisted wing feather from her imping procedure at the Center.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: November 11, 2014

After the release of Common Raven #14-1100 on November 5, Maureen, the raven’s rescuer, returned to work [within two miles of the release site]. Within a few hours, she saw a raven outside of her office building – very likely the newly released female raven.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: November 5, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 was released today at Bryan Park in Richmond, Virginia. A crowd of about 100 people attended the release and eagerly listened as Wildlife Center veterinary director Dr. Dave McRuer shared the story of the raven’s rescue and rehabilitation. Certified wildlife rehabilitator Amber Dedrick unlatched the transport crate containing the raven, and everyone watched as the raven flew, beautifully, to a large oak tree. The raven sat in the tree for several minutes before she flew out of sight. 

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: November 3, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been flying well during the past few weeks. The staff have carefully monitored the bird for additional feather loss and have been exercising the bird daily to get her back into shape. The raven now has great stamina and is able to maneuver well through the Center’s 100-foot flight pen. On Friday, October 31, the veterinary team drew blood from the raven for a pre-release analysis; results were within normal limits.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: October 14, 2014

Raven patient #14-1100 is doing very well after having several feathers imped in September. The bird lost two of the feathers that were imped last month, but she is flying well.

On October 13, the rehabilitation staff moved the raven to a larger flight pen [A3] for conditioning prior to release. The raven will stream live on the Center's Critter Cams -- this is the first passerine patient to be featured on the Critter Cam!

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: September 30, 2014

Raven #14-1100 has been doing well this past month. She has been housed in one of the Center’s outdoor C-pens while the staff monitored her feather growth.

To keep her engaged, the Raven has received enrichment almost daily. Enrichment includes unique food items or food delivery (e.g., food stuffed inside a rubber dog toy), changing the perches in her enclosure, or placing different substrates in trays on the enclosure floor (e.g., dead leaves and rocks in an aluminum tray). Rehabilitation intern Jordan recalls putting “cricket ice cubes” in the bird’s water dish.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: August 25, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been doing well during the last month. The raven’s feathers are growing in, and the bird is full of energy.

On August 16, the rehabilitation staff moved the raven from the C-pen enclosure to a smaller aviary enclosure to make room for other patients that needed the space.

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted an unusual patient – an adult Common Raven – from Richmond, Virginia. Since 2000, the Center has admitted fewer than 10 ravens as patients.

The raven (believed to be a female) was part of a nesting pair in Henrico County. Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries were aware of the nest, which was situated near an office building. Nesting ravens in that part of the state are far less common; ravens in Virginia are typically found closer to the mountains.

Latest Update: July 11, 2014

Common Raven #14-1100 has been doing well in her outdoor enclosure. The staff continues to monitor her feather growth and appetite. The bird is bright and active, and she maneuvers well on the “jungle gym” of perches set up in her enclosure.

To keep this patient entertained, the rehabilitation staff has given the bird plenty of enrichment items, including rotting logs and fruit stuffed with mice.

Barred Owlet #14-1179

On June 11, a young Barred Owlet was admitted to the Center after it was found on the ground in Ashe County, North Carolina. During the initial exam, the owlet was very bright, alert, and feisty. Veterinary staff found a small bump on the right side of bird’s beak [likely a callous from an old fracture], some old scabbing on both feet, and evidence of minor blunt head trauma indicated by small amounts of blood in its left eye. A fecal sample revealed the presence of some internal parasites, and the Barred Owlet was started on antibiotics and anti-parasitic medication.

Latest Update: September 25, 2014

Barred Owlets #14-0668 and 14-1179 have been eating well and growing at the Center during the summer. Both owls are looking much more like adults – at times, it can be hard to distinguish between them and their surrogate Barred Owl mother.

Bald Eagle #14-1040

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 24, 2014

After six days of living in the A1 flight pen, Bald Eagle #14-1040 appeared to be unable to fly to any moderately high perches. The eagle was often observed either on a short A-frame perch, or on the ground. On July 21, the eagle was caught up and anethetized for radiographs. The veterinary team found several abnormalties in the eagle’s right carpal [wrist] region, including evidence of ligament damage and changes within the bone of the joint.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 15, 2014

On July 15, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved to a larger enclosure – flight pen A1. The eagle was doing well in a small outdoor enclosure, and the rehabilitation staff felt the bird would do well in a larger space at this point in the rehabilitation process. The eagle’s amputated toe is healed and the bird has been perching well; Dr. Rich cleared the eagle to be moved to a larger flight pen.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: July 10, 2014

On June 25, Bald Eagle #14-1040 was moved outside to the Center’s C-pens [C6]. During the next few days, the veterinary staff performed daily checks on the bird’s partially amputated toe and noted that the surgery site was healing well and quickly. On June 28, Dr. Rich Sim removed the eagle’s bandage and found that the toe was completely healed.

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 26, 2014

On June 24, Bald Eagle #14-1040 had the sutures removed from its toe amputation. According to Dr. Rich Sim, the incision site was healing well, and was clean and healthy. The veterinary staff bandaged the bird’s toe; they’ll check the bandage daily and will change the bandage every three days. Bald Eagle #14-1040 has been eating well and was moved to the Center’s outdoor C-pens on June 25.  

At approximately 3:00 pm on June 3, a Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transported the bird to the Center after it was found down on the ground at a power plant in King George County.

Latest Update: June 16, 2014

After three days of tube-feeding, Bald Eagle #14-1040 showed improvement in attitude and appetite and progressed to eating a meal of chopped rat. The veterinary team continued to provide daily flushing and laser therapy sessions to the eagle’s injured toe, but on June 9, joint fluid from the eagle’s left toe was present, and the veterinary staff determined that the eagle would require a partial amputation of its toe.

Bald Eagle #14-2378

On December 8, a juvenile female Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in a landfill in Gloucester County. The bird was captured and transported to local wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor. Diana examined the bird and noted that the eagle was bright, but quickly became dull after handling—an indication the bird may be suffering from a toxicity. A pox-like lesion was also found near the bird’s right eye. The Bald Eagle was immediately transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Eastern Box Turtle #14-2326

On November 1, a homeowner in Lynchburg found an adult Eastern Box Turtle in her yard – its carapace [upper shell] was entirely painted with pink latex paint! The turtle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and was transferred to the Wildlife Center on November 15.